The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » Marketing Program (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3~4~5~6 [Next]
jackturk
View Profile
Elite user
463 Posts

Profile of jackturk
Business cards are an art-form in themselves.

I think of mine as a mini-direct response classified ad, with a cool picture, testimonials, my USP, and a clear call to action.

I'll acknowledge I can't quantify how many gigs I get from the cards, but I do know for certain that one path for getting to me is "My friends saw you and gave me your number." and an easy way to make sure they keep your number is with that biz card.

--Jack Turk
"59 Ways To Recession Proof Your Entertainment Business -- FREE!"
http://www.GetLeadsLikeCrazy.com

"How To Make $25,000 a Year Doing Birthday Parties Part-Time"
http://www.magicmarketingcenter.com/birthdayPT
trickychaz
View Profile
Special user
West Virginia
549 Posts

Profile of trickychaz
Quote:
On 2010-02-15 01:11, Thom Bliss wrote:
I didn't have much luck with parenting magazines either, so I dropped them. But apparently some of my competitors think they're doing okay, because they keep advertising in them. Maybe they have found ads that work in parenting magazines, maybe they just don't know where their clients find them.

But I still give out business cards, even though nobody has ever said they got my number from a business card.



Thom


I hand out my jumbo dollar bills to all the kids. I have never had someone call and say "my kid gave me this dollar" but I still hand them out. It's a combination of all the little things that have made a difference. I have tear off flyers around town on 12 different billboards. I haven't received a call from them, but when I checked them, at least 3 or so have been torn off. This may bring results later in the year.
Futureal
View Profile
Inner circle
1588 Posts

Profile of Futureal
Chaz,

You say you're a full time magician. Out of interest how many shows are you doing per week? On average.

If you don't mind sharing.
trickychaz
View Profile
Special user
West Virginia
549 Posts

Profile of trickychaz
I don't think that is important, but thanks for asking! I have been full time since November and it has been very rewarding.
MikeClay
View Profile
Special user
Atlanta GA
752 Posts

Profile of MikeClay
I agree Chaz,,
Full time means

"This is my primary source of income."

If I do 1 show a month at 5k a show.. does that then cause me to NOT be a FULL TIME entertainer... over someone who does 10 birthday parties a week?

on the same note..

if I make on average 10k a month as a consultant working 10 hrs a week and work longer and more as a Entertainer making less money.. but still earning more as a entertainer than MANY.. does that then mean YOUR no longer a full time entertainer because I do more and make more and it's not my full time job??

anyway.. that's all just to say..
what I said in the 1st sentence
lou serrano
View Profile
Special user
Los Angeles, CA
670 Posts

Profile of lou serrano
Mike,

Excellent point.

Lou Serrano
Arthur Scargill
View Profile
New user
20 Posts

Profile of Arthur Scargill
I have read Jack's comments on this forum and I always find them very constructive. His course seems very reasonably priced and I do get a gut feeling that it would be very good indeed. I don't see how anyone can lose at the price he charges along with his money-back guarantee.

I do have one minor quibble though. It may be just a personal issue of mine but I was relieved to see that a similar point was made in a mail order marketing book I came across in a bookshop.

I always get turned off when I am addressed as "Dear Friend" in a sales letter. I may not even read the piece. How can I be a "dear friend" if I don't even know the person who is writing me (along with hundreds of others) a letter that I know is trying to sell me something. It comes across as insincere and false.

I know nothing about marketing and I am simply talking as a consumer. I expect I will be in the minority and other people won't mind this salutation one bit. It bothers me though and presumably it will bother other people too.

I think it may be something for Jack to think about.
jackturk
View Profile
Elite user
463 Posts

Profile of jackturk
Interesting point about "Dear Friend"...

Of course it's better to use someone's actual first name in any marketing piece - personalization has a whole lot more power. We all love to see and hear our names - we've been hearing them from infancy and if there really is anything like a true "magic word" it's the sound of hearing your own name.

On an impersonal webpage where I promote a product (or you promote your service - no real difference) of course it would be better to use the first name there too.

But if you don't have the person's name, then you have to choose from one of several impersonal generic monikers. I don't have the research to back this up, but I've read and heard that the best all-purpose term to use is "Friend". Obviously it's not
perfect nor will it convince everyone that I'm a) really their friend or b) have the right to even consider such a thing, it is by-and-by a pretty reasonable and non-threatening term to use.

--Jack Turk
"59 Ways To Recession Proof Your Entertainment Business -- FREE!"
http://www.GetLeadsLikeCrazy.com

"How To Make $25,000 a Year Doing Birthday Parties Part-Time"
http://www.magicmarketingcenter.com/birthdayPT
Arthur Scargill
View Profile
New user
20 Posts

Profile of Arthur Scargill
Quite frankly I would be even more irritated if someone used my actual name. I would consider it a breach of privacy. I would far prefer an anonymous generic neutral type of greeting. I DON"T want to feel that I have been singled out for special attention. Perhaps I am different from other people.

I really don't like the "Dear Friend" salutation and I recall that quite independently some mail order expert or other advised against it too. It is driving me nuts trying to remember where I read the advice. I do know that I smirked with great self satisfaction when I read it since I had always thought it even before I read it.

AHA! I have just had a hunch where I read it! Perhaps I didn't read it in a bookshop after all as I first thought. One moment please.

Egad! I am in a state of great delight since I have actually found the book with the advice against using this dreadful,sickly, insincere salutation. It is a very old book which I read years ago. It was written way before the advent of computers but it is still the most sensible and realistic book on mail order that I have ever read. And of course many mail order techniques apply even to sales letters on the internet.

The book is entitled "Run a Successful Mail Order Business" by Howard Sparks. Here is the relevant paragraph:
"Just as most saleas letters dispense with a formal salutation, they also omit the nauseatingly familiar "Dear Friend" that used to be used so regularly. Many people resent being called "Dear" and "Friend", especailly by someone at a remote distance who has no right to presume such a relationship"

I find it interesting that this old book published decades ago mentions that the "Dear Friend" thing is actually old fashioned and no longer used. Jack has resurrected something that was old even thirty years ago when I first purchased the book.

And a shudder has just passed through me as I think I remember where I purchased the book. I swear it was at a flea market and the lady manning the booth was Brad Christian's mother, I kid you not. Brad of course is the multi-millionaire entrepeneur who owns Ellusionist. I wonder if Brad read it before his mother sold it. Now I know how he became rich.

Now that I have calmed down from my shudder I think now on reflection that it may not have been Brad's mother who sold it to me but one of the neighbouring vendors.

But back to the original point. I wonder if I am the only one who feels like throwing up when I see "Dear Friend"? I repeat, I like Jack's posts but on this one thing I do differ with him.

Any other opinions on this?
lou serrano
View Profile
Special user
Los Angeles, CA
670 Posts

Profile of lou serrano
I've been called much worse. I'd much rather be called a friend.

Lou Serrano
TomBoleware
View Profile
Inner circle
Hattiesburg, Ms
2730 Posts

Profile of TomBoleware
Dear Friends: Smile

Honestly, in a sales letter it use to bug me too, but then when I think about it.

Friends do come in all shapes and sizes.
There are good friends and bad friends.
New friends and old friends.
Close friends and potential friends.
So I guess it really depends on how you take the word friend.

The idea that you must know someone before you can call them
friend is probably long gone. Especially since places like Myspace
and Facebook came along. There everybody you speak to is considered a friend.
Even here on this forum, most see each other as friends.

Asking someone to be your friend,(even if they are trying to sell you) is never a bad thing.

Tom
"Entrepreneurs are willing to work 80 hours a week to avoid working 40 hours a week"--Lori Greiner

www.tomboleware.com
Arthur Scargill
View Profile
New user
20 Posts

Profile of Arthur Scargill
Ugh!
And I even feel the same about that awful facebook thing. I refuse to go near it. All sorts of people saying that they are your "friend" and you don't even know them.
It really is a sickly salutation and I suspect that I am not the only one who feels like throwing up when I read it.
jackturk
View Profile
Elite user
463 Posts

Profile of jackturk
So Arthur, what moniker/term should I use when I send YOU my next sales letter?
"59 Ways To Recession Proof Your Entertainment Business -- FREE!"
http://www.GetLeadsLikeCrazy.com

"How To Make $25,000 a Year Doing Birthday Parties Part-Time"
http://www.magicmarketingcenter.com/birthdayPT
Arthur Scargill
View Profile
New user
20 Posts

Profile of Arthur Scargill
Jack. That is entirely up to you. You are the marketing expert not me. I expect I would be fine with anything providing it doesn't say "Dear Friend". In fact I am not even sure any salutation is required at all.
bubbleburst2004
View Profile
Veteran user
370 Posts

Profile of bubbleburst2004
Quote:
On 2010-02-25 08:25, jackturk wrote:
So Arthur, what moniker/term should I use when I send YOU
my next sales letter?


I would have thought "Dear Mark" would be appropriate.
TomBoleware
View Profile
Inner circle
Hattiesburg, Ms
2730 Posts

Profile of TomBoleware
That was my thought too.

Somethings you just can't hide no matter how hard you try.

Tom
"Entrepreneurs are willing to work 80 hours a week to avoid working 40 hours a week"--Lori Greiner

www.tomboleware.com
Arthur Scargill
View Profile
New user
20 Posts

Profile of Arthur Scargill
Throwing up a smokescreen to distract us from the main question may be terribly commendable but it really isn't terribly helpful to Jack. This is important information for him and his livelihood is at stake. He is in danger of losing customers if he uses the wrong approach. I think you should all be focusing on the opinion of Howard Sparks rather than me. For those of who were not paying attention I shall try again. Here is what I said:
..................................................................................

The book is entitled "Run a Successful Mail Order Business" by Howard Sparks. Here is the relevant paragraph:
"Just as most sales letters dispense with a formal salutation, they also omit the nauseatingly familiar "Dear Friend" that used to be used so regularly. Many people resent being called "Dear" and "Friend", especailly by someone at a remote distance who has no right to presume such a relationship"
..................................................................................
If you were all to stop playing silly guessing games (which are all wrong, incidentally) and focus on the subject at hand you might learn something.

This salutation is questionable and other marketing experts besides Howard Sparks also advise against it. If you wish to check it out google is at your disposal.
bubbleburst2004
View Profile
Veteran user
370 Posts

Profile of bubbleburst2004
Quote:
On 2010-02-25 17:04, Arthur Scargill wrote:

If you were all to stop playing silly guessing games (which are all wrong, incidentally) and focus on the subject at hand you might learn something.



What's sad is that you have so much to offer, I love reading all your posts and have implemented quite a few things I've read over the years on different forums. But you are the one who insists on playing silly games, and this will as always come back to bite you.
TomBoleware
View Profile
Inner circle
Hattiesburg, Ms
2730 Posts

Profile of TomBoleware
Sad, sad indeed.

Jack, and many others here, certainly know more than I do about what is best to use in a sales letter.
But I would think if the word friend caused someone not to buy, then you didn't really have a chance anyway.

Just a thought, but a simple Hello, sounds good to me too.

Tom
"Entrepreneurs are willing to work 80 hours a week to avoid working 40 hours a week"--Lori Greiner

www.tomboleware.com
Blair Marshall
View Profile
Inner circle
Montreal, Canada
3640 Posts

Profile of Blair Marshall
Hey Arthur,

A key word in that phrase is "many", if you quantify it, and it is less than, let's say 10%, would you stop using it? If my response rate was 90% to a "Dear Friend" salutation, I would not move from it. I'll let you post the stats. as I do not use it and am not interested in the results (but if posted here it would be interesting). Tested results is what I like to hear.

Personally, in a generic bulk mailing to a list, I may use (family market) "Hi There", or "Good Day", in my more specific mailing I always use the individuals' name, because that mailing is important to me and it's "worth" the time to fins out who the correct contact is.

Blair
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » Marketing Program (0 Likes)
 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3~4~5~6 [Next]
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2020 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.18 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL