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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Shuffled not Stirred » » What age can someone memorise a deck ? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Groucho
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I have been wondering what age do you think someone can memorise a deck - I want to train up my daughter (currently 2) to learn a stack so that I can freak out the relatives. I started her on the rules of "snap" last week to get her used to the different cards.

Has anyone else tried to train a child as a st**ge at a young age?
Shrubsole
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I can see only two relevant things here:

1 Children develop at different rates and so with your daughter it may be two young or it may not.

2 There is completely nothing dangerous about learning things, only the things we learn. She will do and is doing that every day without anyone's permission and will continue to do it for the rest of her life.

Solution: As in (2) there is nothing dangerous at all with the learning process so simply try it. The beauty with the human species is that they will grow, so if you find that she is too young now, wait a month and start again. You can only find out by Learn, test, repeat. That will tell you if she is ready and capable yet.

The only problems with teaching children is their attention span and the parents ability to teach! (parents do not always make the best teachers!)

Whilst you are spending quality time with your daughter, now would be a good time to start to ingrain other things as well like: Thou shalt not borrow Daddy's car without permission and put a large dent in the fender. OR, Thou shalt not go out and get drunk and bring home the most repulsive scumbag to meet Daddy.
Winner of the Dumbringer Award for total incompetence. (All years)
Groucho
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Shrubsole,

I wonder if I show her cards too often that instead of counting "10,11,12,13" she might think say "10, Jack, Queen, King" (that could be an interesting one to explain to the teachers).

Cheers

Groucho
Waterloophai
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Quote:
On 2010-02-08 21:48, Groucho wrote:
I want to train up my daughter (currently 2) to learn a stack so that I can freak out the relatives.

"Your daughter (TWO years) has to learn a stack, so YOU can freak out the relatives".
Very nice and especially educational motiv I must say.
I suddenly have the feeling I must volmit.
Shrubsole
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There is no "has to" about it as most 2 year old won't do anything they don't want to.

Teaching and expanding their mind is hardly child abuse is it?

If it was, all education would be banned.
Winner of the Dumbringer Award for total incompetence. (All years)
leosx1
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I would first try to find out if magic is something she is interested in, in general...and then go from there
jake.o
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There are so much more easier tricks that you could teach her but at two years old I think theres more important things she could be learning.
bunkyhenry
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Quote:
On 2010-02-09 04:36, Waterloophai wrote:
Quote:
On 2010-02-08 21:48, Groucho wrote:
I want to train up my daughter (currently 2) to learn a stack so that I can freak out the relatives.

"Your daughter (TWO years) has to learn a stack, so YOU can freak out the relatives".
Very nice and especially educational motiv I must say.
I suddenly have the feeling I must volmit.


Your post gives me the same feeling. At least you are politically correct.
WilburrUK
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As with virtually every other prop in history, the first thought of some magicians is "how can I use this for a card trick".
Dennis Loomis
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I agree that you don't want to force a young child to do something, but exposing them to information and allowing them to absorb whatever they want may give them an early start on their education.

As a first step, I would introduce basic mnemonics and see how that works out. Doing card tricks is something of fairly limited value, but being able to use mnemonics is most certainly not. I started working with mnemonics in Jr. High School, and it was of GREAT help in High School and College. In fact, when I met Harry Lorayne I shook his hand and thanked him. I told him that I probably would not have gotten my college degree if it had not been for picking up a copy of his book: How to Develop a Super-Power Memory in 1958.

Dennis Loomis
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jcigam
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The average child learns to count to 10 and to recite the alphabet somewhere between two and four. Unless your child is exceptionally gifted (and I am not suggesting she isn't) I would be shocked (pleasantly so) if she could learn a complete stack.

On another note, I can't see how this is a bad thing. She could be doing something really trivial like taking care of a Webkin.

Keep us informed of her/your progress.

Jered
"The mind has exactly the same power as the hand, not merely to grasp the world, but to change it."
WilburrUK
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Quote:
On 2010-03-31 14:51, jcigam wrote:
..On another note, I can't see how this is a bad thing. She could be doing something really trivial like taking care of a Webkin.

Keep us informed of her/your progress.

Jered


Yeah, heaven forbid a two year-old child should be doing something trivial (I have no idea what a Webkin is btw).
Mary Mowder
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Dear Groucho,

Any tool that helps her organize her memory and thinking is great. She'll only do it as long as she is interested and any form of enjoyable practice increases a child's attention span and focus which is a great advantage in most pursuits. You might start with more object oriented and colorful memory games first.

Once a child gets the idea and the interest you'll be shocked at how fast they learn.

Quality one-on-one parent time is often a cherished memory no matter what the subject.

Parents have been making kids do dances, songs and recitals to impress others for ages. I don't think it harms kids generally. I think its good for their brain development.

I bet you'll have a harder time teaching the acting skills necessary than the deck order.

Have fun with your daughter.

- Mary Mowder
Tim Dowd
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I remember teaching my daughter to say "Daddy, Daddy, Daddy..." when she was just out of the womb... 18 months later her first word was "Scheiße" with hiccups "Sch... Sch... Scheiße"

I then taught her to crawl (by example as I came home from the pub every night)

We had a rule... I speak only English and my wife speaks only German (Bavarian) she understood and used both languages fluently and without translation.

Things learned by heart are very easy in early childhood. If I told a story "wrong" meaning that I did not repeat it verbatim. She knew...

Learning a stack is easy at two years old (learning the difference between two, to and too is hard at any age)

No wonder Waterloophai want's to vomit have you tried Belgian Beer?

(Timothy wants to apologize in advance for hurting Waterloophai's feelings, unless he is like most of the Belgians he knows and can take a joke... then we meet in Ghent next time I meet my friend Steve Shorrock)
Timothy Dowd
...Making the Magic Happen!
http://www.timothydowd.com
http://vimeo.com/channels/mymagic
These are my points of view; I accept no responsibility for your interpretation of what I just said...
Damon Zale
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From the stuff I learned in my child psych classes back in college I assure you it will only help develop her brain. At least being bilingual has been shown to correlate with higher IQ test scores and this, intuitively , is no different then being able to count in different languages. She would know that in school 1 is One, but at home its JS Smile , lots of families I know teach their kids to count in Russian and those kids have no trouble adapting to English counting.
Weather it is possible at 2 is another matter Smile - but as others said , keep at it and she will grow and be able to do it. Can she count yet , or understand cards?
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