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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Believe it or not... » » Making fire eating torches (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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hocuspocusjay23
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Recently my wife got into fire eating. Can someone recommend the easiest torches to make. I have noticed on some videos using t shirt material. We have used adhesive wick to make torches.Itseems that sometimes the glue does not hold properly. Is it best to let the wick sit over night for better adhesion? Sometimes the lighter fluid, keeps the adhesive from sticking well. What is the best way?
gsidhe
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What glue are you using?
The best is good old fashioned elmers glue. The heat actually cures it harder and it is immune to the fluids used.
And you don't need to let it sit for long at all. The heat speeds up the process.
G
hocuspocusjay23
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I am using the adhesive wicks from Fire Mecca. What type of material are you using?
gsidhe
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Depends on the purpose.
Most of my wicks are made from cotton belt webbing.
Emphasis on COTTON. No blends. They make your mouth all melty.

G
thegreatnippulini
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Jay, PM me for details on the no-glue wicking I put on my torches that I make.
The Great Nippulini: body piercer, Guinness World Record holder, blacksmith and man with The World's Strongest Nipples! Does the WORLD care? We shall see...
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Michael K
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I'm going to say what everyone usually says when someone asks about fire eating.

FIND A QUALIFIED TEACHER.

And if you want to kill yourself watch how-to fire stunts on Youtube.
Martin_Ling
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Seems to me we aren't discussing LEARNING how to do fire play, but more how to put a piece of clothe, on a stick, that will stay. So here are my two cents.

I like Kevlar, sewn with a lock stitch, using Kevlar thread. What makes it even easier is the ingenious design, which I wont divulge, by Mr. Nippulini! Buy yourself a set and see why!
EVILDAN
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I acquired a set of homemade torches that were made by wrapping a long strip of cotton material and then sewing it. The stitching got burned away. But I do like the size and workability of the strip of cotton material. How does one go about using Elmer's Glue to glue this down? And does the glue get all "melty" when lit?
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gsidhe
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To glue a wick is pretty simple. Hook one end to your torch base, wrap it around putting a drop or two every couple of revolutions. When you get to the end put a line of glue across it (Covering any frayed ends) and then clamp it with a clothespin or similar not terribly strong spring clamp. Leave it that way for an hour and you are set.
Elmers glue does not get melty when it gets hot, it gets harder. I usually do a burn right after taking the clamps off to "set" the glue well.

Not a big fan of kevlar- I don't feel it holds enough fuel for long burns. Which I suppose is fine for fire eating as you don't let it burn all that long. I do a lot of wicking on poi, fire fans, flaming bat'leth (Yes...I have a set of two. Nothing like a geek fire performer!) fire claws and such where you need a longer burn. I just can't get that from kevlar. Cotton works well as long as you extinguish before your run out of fuel. The glued wicks are pretty strong considering how fast they are being spun. Never had one give out on me, but if they come loose at al, you just reglue.
Freak Prodigy
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My preference for wicking is a cotton interior with a wrapped Kevlar exterior.
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thegreatnippulini
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Slim Price gave me one his last torches. When I started my interest in fabricating torches I dissected his. The core was glued to the rod with HOT GLUE. I was floored. How could that NOT get all melty and slide off? That's why I invented my reverse barb-hook design. When properly wrapped, a wick secured to the ceiling of my shop was able to hold my body weight.
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FacadeTheStiltBoy
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Is it just me or does anybody else notice the difference in taste when it comes to natural fiber wicking and Kevlar?
Rotten
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T.G.N., It's cool you have Slim's Torches. "The Red Headed Sluts" as I believe he called them. I always meant to buy a set, but then it was too late. Are yours red? I always wondered what he used for a red wick but never saw one.

I use white virgin cotton I bought from a medical supply store. It comes in a big roll and is much like a sheet of cotton balls. I cut off a five inch length, two + inch wide strip and wind it around the tip of my torch. The tip is folded over for a hook so the first few wraps go under it then over making sure to cover the tip so it won't become exposed and hot at a later time. After I have it wrapped to the tightness I want I put the head in my mouth and roll it around to make it smooth and not so fluffy.

Then I sew it up with black cotton thread. I used to use 100% cotton thread but can't find it now so I am using mercerized thread. I know I shouldn't but amazingly it doesn't burn. I keep my torches pretty wet and don't let them burn for long. Thread is so much nicer than wire IMO, because it doesn't get hot. With thread wrapped around the base of the head I get fewer burns on the lips. I still get the occasional white lip but only when the A/C is blowing the flame around or if I'm paying attention to something else.
Harley Newman
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I use cotton core, with a kevlar outer layer. It doesn't hold fluid as much as simply cotton, but it lasts a looooong time.
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Freak Prodigy
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Quote:
On 2010-04-01 19:09, Harley Newman wrote:
I use cotton core, with a kevlar outer layer. It doesn't hold fluid as much as simply cotton, but it lasts a looooong time.


Yes yes!
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gsidhe
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I never considered making hybrid wicks! I'll have to try it!
Thanks Brett/Harley!
thegreatnippulini
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Slims's torch heads had cotton wicking hot glued to a brass rod. The head were then covered with a tiny red (Kevlar?) sock. The base of the sock was secured with thin copper wire. In the process of taking it apart I realized I'd never be able to put it back.

Brett.... I have an idea for you..... make a glass torch handle.
The Great Nippulini: body piercer, Guinness World Record holder, blacksmith and man with The World's Strongest Nipples! Does the WORLD care? We shall see...
http://www.greatnippulini.com
erikkloeker
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I think I remember him saying the red part was terry cloth, (cotton.)
Stephon
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The wick was cotton dish towel, and the sleeve was:

"a product called 'Surgitube', a bandage made for extremities such as fingers. It comes in a roll a few yards long. I dye the whole package red (all at once) with RIT dye and use it as needed. Apply as neeeded acccording to the provided directions. It makes a perfect snug cover that can be used in just a few moments. I always have new looking torches, although the cores are many years old. Recently, I found out that Surgitube uses two different materials. One is a synthetic that will melt in seconds! Not the one to use. The other is the old standby cotton that will last for several shows."
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Rotten
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Thanks Stephon. You have answered a question I thought was never going to be answered for me! I never thought of asking you guys after Slim passed. I'm guessing "Surgitube" is flesh colored at the start? I'll have to look for some of it. That sound's much easier than what I have to do every 5-6 months. Just changing a sock and leaving the core in place. Love it!

Regards,
Ted
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