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Vlad_77
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*Drawing a deeeep breath to be calm....

It is spelled "sleight" not "slight".

I have seen the phrase "slight of hand" far too many times - and by English speakers. Non-English speakers I can understand but ...

Main Entry: sleight
Pronunciation: \ˈslīt\
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse slœgth, from slœgr sly — more at sly
Date: 14th century
1 : deceitful craftiness; also : stratagem
2 : dexterity, skill

Main Entry: slight
Pronunciation: \ˈslīt\
Function: adjective
Etymology: Middle English, smooth, slight, probably from Old English sliht- (in eorth-slihtes level with the ground); akin to Old High German sleht smooth, slīhhan to glide — more at slick
Date: 14th century
1 a : having a slim or delicate build : not stout or massive in body b : lacking in strength or substance : flimsy, frail c : deficient in weight, solidity, or importance : trivial <a slight movie>
2 : small of its kind or in amount <a slight chance> <a slight odor of gas>

Thank you for reading Smile

Ahimsa,
Vlad
Jonathan Townsend
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Vlad, you are touching upon some still though deep waters.
In magic spelling decides whether one obtains a storm or a decision.
In magic grammar decides whether one is or plays the fool.

Facile knowledge of some aspects of guile do not excuse nor can they compensate for working knowledge of the basics of our language.

So to those who wish to pass undetected I remind you that one can easily feel slighted or see such things if only peripherally.
...to all the coins I've dropped here
Cyberqat
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Very good point and this is one of which I'm sure I've been guilty.

Thanks for the reminder.
It is always darkest just before you are eaten by a grue.
Servante
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Back in the 70's a printer was making about 500 posters and sent the proof to me. I looked it over carefully, sent it back.
THEN he "fixed" my spelling of "sleight" to "slight."
And printed the posters.
It's bad enough that nobody seems to be able to spell these days.
But when they "fix" it so that it seems you can't spell either, it's tempting too jest giv upp.

-Philip
Cyberqat
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As a writer I've had that happen. Usually its the editor's spell checker doing the dirty work.
It is always darkest just before you are eaten by a grue.
LobowolfXXX
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I prefer "slight of hand," but the only magician I ever discuss is Jay Sankey.
"Torture doesn't work" lol
Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

"...as we reason and love, we are able to hope. And hope enables us to resist those things that would enslave us."
walid ahumada
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Thanks for the English lesson.

Walid.
“Magic becomes art when it has nothing to hide.” BEN OKRI quote
Mr. Mystoffelees
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Quote:
On 2010-08-08 22:13, LobowolfXXX wrote:
I prefer "slight of hand," but the only magician I ever discuss is Jay Sankey.


Good one!
Also known, when doing rope magic, as "Cordini"
panlives
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Hi Vlad,

Although I believe that English is a fluid language, there is a difference between the freedom to coin neologisms and new usages (without grammar tight-***** insisting that language is not a user-modifiable technology) and blatant misspellings - even if "contemporary" spelling is a temporal ripple on the surface of linguistic structure.

English words do change over time - in meaning, spelling, context and subtext.

I get a chuckle when I think about what institution might dole out penalties for using misspelled words…a ticket from the Dictionary Police? The revocation (as the joke goes) of one’s poetic license?

However, in this place and time, there is special significance to the word “sleight” that I feel should not be diluted or lost by writing slightly.

So, Vlad, I agree with you on this one…

…although I do like the unintended subtext of the “slight” misspelling, which can serve to moderate the egos of pretentious and arrogant magicians who think their abilities are instrumental to mediating the forces that govern the Earth’s gravitational rotation.


Vlad,

Did the deep breathing work for you?

Concerned...
"Is there any point to which you would wish to draw my attention?"
"To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time."
"The dog did nothing in the night-time."
"That was the curious incident," remarked Sherlock Holmes.
longhaired1
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Someone once asked if I could perform some "Sliding Hand" for him.
LobowolfXXX
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Quote:
On 2010-08-09 10:59, panlives wrote:
Hi Vlad,

Although I believe that English is a fluid language, there is a difference between the freedom to coin neologisms and new usages (without grammar tight-a**es insisting that language is not a user-modifiable technology) and blatant misspellings - even if "contemporary" spelling is a temporal ripple on the surface of linguistic structure.

English words do change over time - in meaning, spelling, context and subtext.

I get a chuckle when I think about what institution might dole out penalties for using misspelled words…a ticket from the Dictionary Police? The revocation (as the joke goes) of one’s poetic license?

However, in this place and time, there is special significance to the word “sleight” that I feel should not be diluted or lost by writing slightly.

So, Vlad, I agree with you on this one…

…although I do like the unintended subtext of the “slight” misspelling, which can serve to moderate the egos of pretentious and arrogant magicians who think their abilities are instrumental to mediating the forces that govern the Earth’s gravitational rotation.


I'm sure that one day soon, "Me and Jimmy went to the store" will be a perfectly acceptable construction.
"Torture doesn't work" lol
Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

"...as we reason and love, we are able to hope. And hope enables us to resist those things that would enslave us."
Mr. Mystoffelees
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Well, "her and sis went to the movie" is pretty standard in Ohio...


Quote:
On 2010-08-10 02:06, longhaired1 wrote:
Someone once asked if I could perform some "Sliding Hand" for him.

Sounds like a proposition to me...
Also known, when doing rope magic, as "Cordini"
panlives
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Quote:
On 2010-08-10 12:17, mandarin wrote:
Quote:
On 2010-08-10 02:06, longhaired1 wrote:
Someone once asked if I could perform some "Sliding Hand" for him.


Sounds like a proposition to me...


Only with the right kind of fanning powder...
"Is there any point to which you would wish to draw my attention?"
"To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time."
"The dog did nothing in the night-time."
"That was the curious incident," remarked Sherlock Holmes.
tommy
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Legerdemain sounds more sexy.
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
Cyberqat
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Quote:
On 2010-08-10 12:16, mandarin wrote:
Well, "her and sis went to the movie" is pretty standard in Ohio...

And in Florida "All y'all comin' to the movies?"

Is proper grammar, too. Smile


My pet peave.....

It is Copyright not "copywright." It's no wonder people don't understand it when they can't even spell it. Copyright, the right to make copies. Pretty easy, actually.
It is always darkest just before you are eaten by a grue.
Whit Haydn
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My pet peeve: The recent acceptance of the misuse of the term "Begging the question." Incorrect understanding and usage of the term has become so common, it is now accepted usage. It rubs me the wrong way every time I hear it.

Now when I tell someone that their argument "Begs the question," they ask, "What question?"

Twenty years ago, this would have been considered evidence of a lack of education.
funsway
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I guess my per peeve is the use of "the exception proves the rule." Originally an "exception" meant to personally validate as "I take exception" to something said and intend to check it out. There is no concept of using something that doesn't fit the rule to prove the rule. Just another excuse for people to be unaccountable for their actions.
"the more one pretends at magic, the more awe and wonder will be found in real life." Arnold Furst

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travisb
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Much as it bothers me, I think the "begs the question" battle is lost. You're right, it has become accepted usage, and it's aggravating.

I still hold out hope for "disinterested". Writers in my experience are still using that one properly, although just about every time I've heard it spoken (which is rare, I'll admit), it's been used as a synonym for "uninterested". That one might be winnable, though.

-Travis
The Burnaby Kid
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Well, this begs the question, doesn't the "correctness" of correct language have its roots in usage?

</cheeky>
JACK, the Jolly Almanac of Card Knavery, a free card magic resource for beginners.
panlives
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Quote:
On 2010-08-10 16:19, Andrew Musgrave wrote:
Well, this begs the question, doesn't the "correctness" of correct language have its roots in usage?

</cheeky>


I think so...as I wrote in this thread, language is a user-modifiable technology.

It is a form of software encased (perhaps encoded) in our "wetware."

Similar to many other technologies, what seems new and strange and even a bit traumatic now becomes the accepted standard of the near future.

I have watched with dismay one of the most powerful words in the English language ("You") become a truncated abomination in the texting lexicon - "U."

However, if this is the wave of the future, I will accept it…with a bit of deep breathing and exaggerated suspiration...
"Is there any point to which you would wish to draw my attention?"
"To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time."
"The dog did nothing in the night-time."
"That was the curious incident," remarked Sherlock Holmes.
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