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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Ever so sleightly » » Trench Art Chop Cup (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Andrew Zuber
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Dale - do you happen to have a photo of what the shell looked like before you "magicked" it? (Did I spell that right?) I'd be curious just to see a comparison. Plus they're so anti-gun here in England and I'm so used to the U.S. style of handing out guns with Happy Meals nowadays, I'm just chomping at the bit to stare at pictures of ammo whenever I can.
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Dale Houck
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Dakota J Magic at Saint Cloud, FL
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Quote:
On 2010-10-27 21:39, Andrewzuber wrote:
Dale - do you happen to have a photo of what the shell looked like before you "magicked" it?


It never crossed my mind to take "before" photos. However, I have a brother and a sister that both have shells as well. I can take photos of one of those when I'm back in the KC area over Christmas.
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Bill Palmer
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What caliber shell was that?
"The Swatter"

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tabman
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Good luck on finding brass casings at the surplus store. I bought some six inch casings on ebay a few years ago though.
...Your professional woodworking and "tender" loving care in the products you make, make the wait worthwhile. Thanks for all you do...

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Dale Houck
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Dakota J Magic at Saint Cloud, FL
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I believe it is called a 40 mm shell. I don't know if that means 40 mm caliber or not. We were told they were from anti-aircraft guns.

I just found one online surplus store that has them, but the one in the picture looks like it's been out in the weather for a few decades.

http://store.colemans.com/cart/40mm-shell-casing-p-134.html
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Pete Biro
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THE 90mm casing looks good.
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Riley
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Will you be making any shell coins????

:)

(Sorry about that)

Nicely done by the way..
Dale Houck
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Dakota J Magic at Saint Cloud, FL
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Quote:
On 2010-10-27 23:23, Bill Palmer wrote:
What caliber shell was that?


I said I believe this is called 40 mm because it's 40 mm in diameter at the base. I think the mouth would have been crimped down to secure the bullet that was fired from the shell. If they base the size on the mouth opening, this might be a 37 mm casing. The link I posted last night was working last night but I can't get it to work today. I found another source online as well:

http://www.collectorssource.com/results.asp
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Woland
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The caliber of a small-arms cartridge is usually described as the diameter of the casing. For example, the tried and true .38 Special caliber cartridge uses a bullet that is actually only .357 inch in diameter. However, the name of a cartridge doesn't always come from the case diameter. The .357 Magnum cartridge also uses a case that is .38 inch in diameter, although slightly longer than the .38 Special, so that it can be loaded only into a cylinder that is strong enough to handle the increased charge. The developers wanted a distinctive name, and I think that's why they used the bullet diameter. I am not sure if the same principles would apply to artillery shells.

Woland
dsalley13
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Are these what are needed to make one of those military chop cups?:

http://store.colemans.com/cart/40mm-shell-casing-p-134.html

The price isn't bad if it's for brass instead of steel shell casings.

dsalley13
Bill Palmer
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Quote:
On 2010-10-28 12:02, Woland wrote:
The caliber of a small-arms cartridge is usually described as the diameter of the casing. For example, the tried and true .38 Special caliber cartridge uses a bullet that is actually only .357 inch in diameter. However, the name of a cartridge doesn't always come from the case diameter. The .357 Magnum cartridge also uses a case that is .38 inch in diameter, although slightly longer than the .38 Special, so that it can be loaded only into a cylinder that is strong enough to handle the increased charge. The developers wanted a distinctive name, and I think that's why they used the bullet diameter. I am not sure if the same principles would apply to artillery shells.

Woland


This is not entirely true. The .38 caliber is actually a special case. The .45 caliber rounds are usually .45 to .454 inches in diameter. The same is true of the .50 caliber rounds. I think the diving line for "truth in caliber" is roughly the Spanish-American war. The metric calibers are usually very close to the actual diameters of the bullet that is used. The 9 mm bullets are generally 9 to 9.2 mm in diameter, depending on whether the caliber referred to is German or Soviet.
"The Swatter"

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My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

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Woland
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Thank you for the clarification, Mr. Palmer.

But what about artillery rounds? Does a 40 mm round indicate a 40 mm diameter case?

And I forgot to mention, that the chop cup that started this discussion is quite an artistic creation!

Woland
Bill Palmer
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I don't have as much information on artillery rounds as I do on small arms rounds. Most of my info comes from reloading manuals, which seldom get up past about a .540 round.

However, a quick look at specs from different armies indicates that in some cases, it referred to the caliber of the gun, and in other cases it referred to the diameter of the case.
"The Swatter"

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My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
tabman
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Before Gloria was a member of the US Shooting team she was an officer with the ADA (air defense artillery). She said she thought the shell size had to do with the breech.
...Your professional woodworking and "tender" loving care in the products you make, make the wait worthwhile. Thanks for all you do...

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Bill Palmer
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It varies. Modern artillery, when it actually uses traditional shells, usually uses the caliber of the gun. Older artillery, ca. WW I and WW II, uses the size of the shell, which would be the size of the breech.

The latest stuff has no shells at all, but has rockets instead, so it's a different game entirely.
"The Swatter"

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My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
Pete Biro
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My favorite was the "bangalore torpedo" .... we'd stick a bunch of them together and they would go off with a great big BANG GALORE! Bada Boom?
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Dale Houck
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Dakota J Magic at Saint Cloud, FL
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If anyone decides to make one of these, you need to make sure the primer is either inert or not there at all. Just like the tiny blasting caps that are (or were) used to set off dynamite, the primer once struck by the firing pin was designed to set off the main charge in the shell casing. A blasting cap, as tiny as it is, can still blow off a finger or two. I'm guessing an artillery shell primer could do the same if it has not been made inert. The primer is still present on my cup although it has obviously been struck by a firing pin (or whatever they call them on big guns). Still, I took it to a retired military guy I know to double check that it was inert before I started messing with it.
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Bill Palmer
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One trick that reloaders use to kill a primer is to soak it with oil. Still, there is nothing quite like the surprise and shock of having a primer go off in the middle of a reloading session.
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
jazzy snazzy
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Now that's a final load.
"The secret of life is to look good from a distance."
-Charles Schulz
Pete Biro
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You'd have to peel the cup off the ceiling.
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