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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Nothing up my sleeve... » » Best Chink A Chink set? (3 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Curtis Kam
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There's also the one-handed genre, I believe Chad Long is the first? In which small coins (US penny size) in a small square gather in one corner. And Doug Conn's version using Scrabble tiles, in which the tiles gather and spell a word. This was a clip on his website, last I looked.

Also available on Youtube, is Doug Henning's version with seashells

Somewhere also, there's a version with dice, in which the spots are set to show 1,2,3,4 and this is consistent when they arrive in the gathering corner. Bill Simon?
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magicalaurie
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Quote:
On 2010-12-30 16:06, Curtis Kam wrote:
...Somewhere also, there's a version with dice, in which the spots are set to show 1,2,3,4 and this is consistent when they arrive in the gathering corner...


Interesting!
feher
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I know Steve Dacri does a Dice Matrix. I don't know if he's the originator but
he teach's it on his No Filler DVD's.
Tim
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RevJohn
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Daryl has 4 dice routine as well, found on the World's Greatest Dice Magic DVD.

RevJohn
Sean Giles
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Quote:
On 2010-12-30 18:20, magicalaurie wrote:
Quote:
On 2010-12-30 16:06, Curtis Kam wrote:
...Somewhere also, there's a version with dice, in which the spots are set to show 1,2,3,4 and this is consistent when they arrive in the gathering corner...


Interesting!


The routine you are referring too is by Daryl Martinez and is taught on his Foolers Doolers Dvd set
Curtis Kam
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Sean, thanks for the reference to Daryl's Fooler Doolers vol. 3. He does perform it there, but apparently either the routine, or at least the starting routine, is not apparently Daryl's. Here's the description posted at Penguin, presumably supplied by Daryl:

What You Get
A hugely entertaining collection of magic using ropes, dice, silks, coins, card, sponge rabbits and more! If you love magic and you love to laugh, you can do no better! Amongst the many mysteries, Daryl performs and teaches “Pyro-Maniact”-a stunning burnt and restored borrowed handkerchief or dinner napkin, that can be prepared in just seconds, and an amazing version of “Four Dice Chink a Chink.” Not only is there no extra die, but the dice also travel in numerical order! But if you are ready for a laugh riot, watch and learn as Daryl performs and explains “Peter Rabbit Hits the Big Time!”-probably the funniest sponge routine you will ever witness. You, too, can perform this hilarious masterpiece in just minutes!
Contains:
Peter Rabbit Hits the Big Time (Daryl)
Four Dice Chink-A-Chink (Bob Barrell)
Follow the Leader (Dai Vernon, Tom Bowers, Daryl)
Three to One Ropes (Martin Lewis, Daryl)
The Tenkai Pennies (Tenkai)
Sliding Knot (Mike Tannen, Daryl)
Back Flip (Sam Schwartz)
Sack's Dice Routine (Dr. Sack)
Bracelet and Rope Routine (Tony Anverdi, Jack Chanin, Rick Johnsson, Flip, Daryl)
Penetrating Matches (Martin Gardner)
Pyro-Maniact (Karrell Fox)
Crossed Thought

Anyone know anything about Bob Barrell?
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Sean Giles
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Curtis, I've watched the DVD hoping to find a reference but there's nothing more on there. I've googled different spellings of his name and still nothing.
I really like this version. For anyone that doesn't know it, it's a very nice handling that doesn't use any shells or extra dice and you start and end clean. The only extra needed is a cup or mug that can be borrowed.

kind regards
Sean
magicalaurie
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Thankyou for the info on this!
Curtis Kam
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Okay, I managed to find at least one early reference to Chink-a-Chink being done with dice, where the dice assemble in numerical order, and show up with the proper numbers showing: in "Play it Again Sam, the close up magic of Sam Schwartz" Sam's routine "Chink-a-Dice" is described, in which the dice assemble in the stated fashion. This routine used an extra die, and no dice cup or other cover.

This booklet is copyright Louis Tannen, Inc. 1977. The routine in question has a note stating that it was originally printed in the Linking Ring. No date is given for that, but it must have been prior to '77.
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bigtyme
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Fernando Keops does a wonderful chink a chink with Dice routine that's a real stunner. It's on his Volume 3 DVD Pure Magic. Wishing you all the best for 2011.
Lawrence O
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Quote:
On 2010-12-31 22:00, Curtis Kam wrote:
Okay, I managed to find at least one early reference to Chink-a-Chink being done with dice, where the dice assemble in numerical order, and show up with the proper numbers showing: in "Play it Again Sam, the close up magic of Sam Schwartz" Sam's routine "Chink-a-Dice" is described, in which the dice assemble in the stated fashion. This routine used an extra die, and no dice cup or other cover.

This booklet is copyright Louis Tannen, Inc. 1977. The routine in question has a note stating that it was originally printed in the Linking Ring. No date is given for that, but it must have been prior to '77.



Farrell, Bob & Ganson, Lewis: The Art of Close Up Magic Vol 1 © 1968 by Lewis Ganson p 333: Bob Farrell's Four Dice Chink-A-Chink: Dice and the dice pips transport one by one to the same corner.
The mistyping in Bob Farrell's name solves the mystery over the origin of Daryl's routine.

Now there is also the later but already mentioned
Carré, David: Pabular p. 365 Production of four dice and their use for a chink a chink in progressive order.
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Lawrence O
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There has been so many changes and additions that it seems fair to publish a revised list


Biblio-Videography
Alford, Jason & Conn, Doug: Chink A Change ONYX – Number Three ©April 1998 & The Second Deal ©April 25, 1998 & Thinking and Wondering ©1998 by Alford, Jason & Conn, Doug, Hammond, LA, p 16 Four denomination coins Chink A Chink; p 18 © by Jason Alford and Tomas Blomberg: Slow Motion Chink

Ammar, Michael: Easy To Mater Money Miracles Vol 2. 1995. Shadow coins. The routine is very thorough letting the coins travel from outer left to inner right corner and then from inner right to inner left and then upper right before meeting one by one at the upper right corner (instead of the traditional matrix upper left). A presentation along the steps of Juan Tamariz’s magic way, discarding along the routine every possible solution. The extra coin is supplied by a shell and Michael offers a very nice clean up to re stack the shell at the end (a false turnover could be added for a version on a table). Two coins in each hand. Shelled coin on top of the two coins in right. Classic palm the shell. Have the coins examined. As coins are returned restack the shell rubbing the coins in the other hand to conceal the tiny noise. Table the two far coins (shelled coin on the far right slightly slightly closer to the inner right and left). Adjust the coins, stealing the shell as the coin out of line is adjusted.

Pôl [Paul Asnar]. « Dé...routant ». Editions Cardini Club 1979. reproduced in Revue Magicus n° 117 2001. 5 pages and 26 figures describing this maginificent vertical Chink-a-Chink with four dice, placed behind cards. The dice magically meet behind one single card.

Barros, Jules de: The Hierophant, No. 2 © Winter, 1969 by Racherbaumer, Tibetan Checkers & No. 4 (June, 1970). The version in No. 4 is a lot easier to follow than the version in No. 2 which is in an irritating notation form.

Baumann, Fred: Apocalypse Vol 4 No 2 Feb 1981 p 450 In Hands Chink A Chink: in the spectator's hands!

Bennett, Doug: Extra Sensory Deceptions. 27 pages, stapled booklet. Flash Light (chink-a-chink with flash cubes)

Billis, Bernard. At a PGCDM, Bernard presented the Sands routine with buttons, the last one ending sewn on the silk.

Bious (aka Frédéric Ferrer): Virtual Magic (French magicians’ social network on the net) offers a routine with Nespresso capsules of different colors (explaining how to make the she**s yourself)

Born, John: Matrix God's Way book on coin chink a chink with a lot of work based on Dean Dill's approach to the effect.

Buffaloe, Jim. Hippity Hop Half Modern Coin Magic by J.B. Bobo & Modern Coin Magic by Magic Makers. The concept is rarely used for chink a chink

Carré, David: Pabular p. 365 Production of four dice and their use for a chink a chink.

Chadier, James: French Connection DVD offers many technical variant to achieve the effect using new kicking techniques. Very smart.

Colombini, Aldo. World's Greatest Magic – Matrix. Matrix / Chink-a-Chink.

Conn, Doug. Tricks of My Trade - The Magic of Doug Conn; One of the most magical effects performable is "Chink-A-Chink." From Yank Hoe to Mohammed Bey to Albert Goshman, the genre has seen many variations. David Roth redefined "Chink-A-Chink" by stripping the props to their bare essentials - only four apparent coins and the performer's two hands. He titled his ground-breaking routine the more politically correct, "The Original Chinese Coin Assembly." Multiple variations of Roth's effect soon appeared, and they continue to do so - a testament to how wonderfully magical it is. Michael Ammar, Homer Liwag, Jason Alford, and Chad Long have all applied themselves to the genre (as have I). Doug's contribution to the assemblage is "Scramble."
Doug has taken that venerable household item, the Scrabble™ tile, and applied its distinct properties to "The Original Chinese Coin Assembly." In fact, Doug employs both Roth's routine and Liwag's "Flash Rice" routine within "Scramble." Not only is Doug's routine magical, but it is one that will be talked about after your audience goes home - the familiar Scrabble™ tiles practically ensure this happenstance.
In effect, the performer places four small, familiar-looking wooden tiles on the performing surface in a square formation. While waving his hands above the tiles, they jump around the performing surface as if they had life of their own, eventually collecting into one corner of the square formation. The magician turns the tiles over and their familiarity becomes apparent - Scrabble™ tiles! The four tiles show an E, an O, a G, and an N.
The performer repeats the effect, this time with the letter sides of the tiles visible. As the tiles collect and jump around, they form different words that are in synch with the performer's patter. Finally, as the magician says, "Just say go, and they're GONE…" all four tiles jump to one corner and spell the word "gone!"
You will need five Scrabble™ tiles: one G, two O's, one N, and one E. One of the O tiles should be a slightly darker shade than the other O tile. If you cannot find an O tile with a different shade, then you must mark one of the O tiles very slightly on the blank side so that you can distinguish it from the other tiles. The routine is best performed on a close up mat.

Cros, Daniel. Las Vegas Close Up by Paul Harris p 87 Paper Chase. A paper napkin is torn in four pieces which are rolled up into four balls. After a chink a chink effect repeated three times, the last ball to travel is placed into the pocket and joins the other ones on to the table. Three of the balls are gathered under the finger of a spectator and the fourth is placed to the pocket. Upon lifting his finger and unravelling the napkin balls, the spectator finds that the fourth ball has wielded with the other three and that the napkin has restored.

Cummins, Paul. Apocalypse Vol 10 # 9 Sept 1989 p 1405 Knich A Knich. Backfire chink a chink with Roth handling and a smart special gimmick

Dacri, Steve: No Filler Vol 2 DVD Dice Routine is chink-a-chink style dice assembly with a difference. Four dice magically travel between the performer’s hands with the last die (the Houdini die) escaping from a small metal box before joining the others.

Daryl, (aka Daryl Easton, aka Daryl Martinez): Daryl's Fooler Doolers vol. 3 DVD © November 2002 by L&L Publishing: Four Dice Chink a Chink offers Bob Barrell’s routine where dice trading places in 1, 2, 3, 4 order & World's Greatest Magic by the World’s Greatest Magicians: Dice Magic Vol 4 DVD offers a Chink A Chink dice routine with Daryl’s usual inspiring lines

Diamond, Paul - Lessons in Magic - V3 - Mr Humble [VHS] & Videonics PROGRAM #77 Paul Diamond Vol. 3. Chink a Chink using plastic bottle caps

Dill, Dean: Apocalypse Vol 15 No 1 Jan 1992 p 2023 : Coin Favorite: chink a chink routine using a shell & Apocalypse Vol 16 # 1 Jan 1993 p 2163: Swirl Assembly & Backfire: shadow coins using only coins, a mat and the hands & Apocalypse Vol 17 # 3 March 1994 p 2331: Coin Explosion "Gymnastics with coins"; chink-a-chink display, coins backfire and many coins appear & Extreme Dean Vol 2 No Extra’s uses four coins with Dean’s unique displacement and flick with the coin being dragged at the base of the pinky instead of the base of the thumb. Mixing Al Schneider and Dean Dill would be a killer. Just use the diamond formation or a reverse T formation. A multi coin variant of Jim Buffaloe’s Hippity Hop Half for the last coin could be a nice addition.

Downs, Nelson. Is sometimes erroneously credited for having published the first chink a chink effect by Yank Hoe. The one published in his book is a matrix effect (coins under cards) and not a chink a chink effect (where only the hands are used as cover). Edwin Sachson the other hand describes in Sleight of hand p 40/41 a Chink a chink with sugar lumps and the book was published before 1875. For the record, Nelson Downs was born March 16, 1867.

Draun, Steve: Draun On Dice DVD Mohammed Bey's Chink-a-Chink © by Bob James Magic & Magic Makers, Inc.

Eldin, Peter: The Magic Handbook.1985, Simon & Schuster, 189 pages, softcover. p 18 Chink a Chink: Matrix routine with sugar cubes covered by hands.

Elliott, Bruce: Classic Secrets of Magic. ©1953 by Harper & Row - Galahad Books, illustrated by Stanley Jacks, p 93 Chapter 8: The Two Covers and the Four Objects: Chink A Chink type effects with Coins and Cards and another version with Magazines covering cards

Farrell, Bob & Ganson, Lewis: The Art of Close Up Magic Vol 1 © 1968 by Lewis Ganson p 333: Four Dice Chink-A-Chink: Dice and the dice pips transport one by one to the same corner

Garcia, Daniel. Sh4de DVD. Daniel Garcia’s version without any extra coin or shell & The Daniel Garcia Project Vol 2 DVD Only Four is a brilliant only four coins Chink A Chink.

Goshman, Albert: The Albert Goshman Lecture VHS 1985 by International Magic. Filmed on December 7, 1985 in London, this is a rare opportunity to watch the master present his amazing and entertaining show live, including Chink-A-Chink & The Albert Goshman Lecture DVD same as the VHS version.

Graham, John: Apocalypse Vol 20 No. 3 March 1997 p 2763: Effervescent: a Sympathetic Coins/Chink-A-Chink routine using 4 coins and expanded shell, with the handling to use a "Raven" style device to get rid of the shell

Goshman Albert. Magic by Gosh. The life and times of Albert Goshman by Patrick Page 1985. "Chink-A-Chink". Four beer caps travel from hand to hand, a giant beer cap appearing at the end under the salt shaker. Translation in French by Alain Devals in La magie de Goshman, "Chink-a-Chink" p. 68 to 73 with 10 illustrations. Editions Guy Lore et Daniel Vuittenez, 1987

Gross, Henry: Pure Magic! A Primer in Sleight of Hand. p 191 The Four Paper Balls and Two Napkins: a Chink-a-Chink effect using paper balls and napkins

Haydn, Whit: Chink A Chink (2009 Jim Riser marketed effect): Whit has a nice gold miner story to justify the use of small weights one of them being nicely gaffed.

Hoe, Yank. Conjuring with Coins by T. Nelson Downs. Sympathetic Coins & Greater Magic - A Practical Treatise On Modern Magic by John Northern Hilliard and Edited by Carl W. Jones and Jean Hugard p 689 The Sympathetic Coins (with Shell) and p 1223 A Brief Biography of Yank Hoe

Kam, Kurtis: Kurtis Kam's Deceptions in Paradise Video. Chink A Chink & Professional Close-Up Magic of Curtis Kam by Magic Methods: Chink-A-Chink

Kennedy, John: Lecture III (lecture notes, 1983). Translocation

Keops, Fernando: Pure Magic Vol 3 DVD © July 2005 by L&L Publishing, shares a wonderful chink a chink with Dice routine that's a real stunner.

Klan, Rune. Three Pieces of Silver VHS 1997 Translated in French as Le voyage Sympathique » p. 4 and 5 of the Revue Imagik n° 17 october, no gimmick and ends clean.

Korth, Jens. The Art Of Close Up Magic Vol 2 p 258 Roulette: A routine using poker chips and a roulette cloth. The chips vanish, penetrate, change places and colors. Uses a few gimmicked chips. Phased routine includes a penetration, a Chink-a-Chink sequence, flying counters, a color change, and a climax.

Lefay, Dan: http://www.lefaymagic.nl/ in the Download / video section, the Dutch magician Dan Lefay (a very clean manipulator and a friend to Tommy Wonder) offers his version called Four Coins & Dan Lefay. Dan also performs a chink a chink effect with large pinball balls (steel balls in Lou Serrano's style)

Malini, Max. Malini-Bey Chink-a-Chink. Stars of Magic. Series 3, N° 3. 1947 -Tannen Publications. Four sugar lumps are placed in a square formation. The magician places his hands over two of the sugars. One by one the sugars meet at one of the points. Originally the routine became well known thanks to Max Malini but Mohamed Bey (Samuel Leo Horowitz, a genius) improved it mainly in avoiding the hands crossing.

Malmros, Gert: Chink A Chink Coins. 8 page booklet (1980) by Gert Malmros from Sweden fully explaining his Chink A Chink four coin assembly Routine. This is a sit down routine at a table. The four coins are placed in four corners of the table and covered by the hands. One by one they travel across ending with all four coins under one hand.

Marconick. Marconick’s Super Magic p 2 Les spheres nomades. The effect is performed with three balls (the fourth one being stolen as the third one is taken out from the pocket)

Marlo, Edward: Apocalypse Vol 9 No 1 Jan 86 p 1159 Raised Assembly: a coin chink a chink using just the hands.

Maxwell, Michael: Michael Maxwell's Incredible Magic At The Bar Vol 5 DVD © January 2007 by A-1 MagicalMedia: Chink A Chink

Mullica, Tom: Expert Cigarette Magic Vol 14 DVD includes Tom’s version of Chink-A-Chink & Expert Impromptu Magic Made Easy Vol 3 DVD Chink A Chink

Neighbors, David. David Neighbors on the double coin gimmick p 36: Succession Chink A Chink.

Pace, Jim: Visu-Antics DVD Quick-O-Chink © 2003 by MagicSmith & Visu-Antics DVD Quick-O-Chink © 2005 by Penguin Magic

Parrish, Ed: Ed Parrish's routine for the new style of Jim Riser’s brass weights Chink-a-Chink: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hC6Omtt2jIY is a sort of chink a chink and reverse chink a chink routine. Very interesting.

Regal, David: Apocalypse Vol 13 No 1 Jan 1980 p 1736 The Coin Diamond: a quick backfire chink a chink with coins & Constant Fooling Vol 1 Book; Chink a Drink, great chink a chink effect with bottle caps appearing and assembling on the corners of a napkin in diamond formation, ending with a fifth cap on an appearing real beer bottle at the end & Premise Power and Participation DVD Vol 1 Premise: Chink-A-Drink (from Constant Fooling) David’s brilliant assembly with its logical kicker.


Rindfleisch, Joe. Extreme Coin Magic DVD Matrixy. No extra coin is used. An actual improvement on David Roth’s Chink A Chink and Michael Ammar’s Shadow coins. During the setting up his idea to arrange the visible coins with the dirty hand is nice but the performer should give some movement to the right hand as well. High Rise Matrix is a superb idea of palming a piece of flesh colour clay to gain depth in the coin picking. It achieves something like the Charlie Frye’s matrix with dice: the height of the hand above the travelling object destroys any suspicion of palming (the hand doesn’t even touches the coin). In Joe’s routine the absence of cards supplies an even greater deception than in Charlie Frye’s effect. This is a really great gimmick and Joe supplies a smart idea to disengage it at the proper moment. If performing standing Bob Kohler's Cool Clean Up works with the gimmick on.

Rink (Aka J. Van Rinkhuyzen). The Art of Close Up Magic Vol 2. p 112 Chink A Chink Simplified: Chink-a-Chink using any small lightweight objects and a tiny bit of double sticky tape

Riser, Jim: Brass Weight Chink-A-Chink Sets The weights were initially engraved “50 gr” and the present final version is engraved "2 oz." These are the ones used in Whit Haydn’s superb routine.

Rosenthal, Harvey: Perfect Coin Assembly New Stars of Magic. Volume 1, Number 5. Tannen Publications - 1973, 7 pages and 42 figures. Four coins are placed at the four corners of a silk. The corners of the silk are folded over each of the coins concealing them from view. They all meet at the upper left corner. Each travel is more difficult to understand than the previous one. The last travel is made under impossible conditions.

Roth, David: A Lecture by David Roth. 1977, Chinese coin assembly & Same routine in Apocalypse, Vol 1, N° 1, 1978, an additional coin is used and the hand cross during the routine & Ultra coin assembly. Coin Magic by Richard Kaufmann - 1981. p 51: the hands no longer cross and an additional coin is used & Expert Coin Magic Made Easy Vol 1 Chink A Chink & Expert Coin Magic Made Easy Vol 3 Intermediate to Advanced Coin Magic Chinese coin assembly. & Chink A Chink. Ultimate Coin Manipulation Collection & New York Coin Magic Seminar Vol One Coins Across. Chink A Chink. David has very unique circular movement to bring the coin at the bas of the thumb when it still seems at the fingertips.

Sachs, Edwin: Sleight of hand p 40/41 describes Chink a chink with sugar lumps (since the book was published before 1875, it cannot be claimed that Max Malini, born in 1873, was the inventor of the trick.

Sands, George & Van Slyker. The Tarbell Course in Magic Vol. 6 by Harlan Tarbell, 1954 p. 148-152. Birds of a Feather. This “New version” uses only four coins and a handkerchief by folding its corners over the coins.

Schneider, Al. the Al Schneider Technique Vol 1 Chink a Chink. With the pause as an old Buddhist Monk: The routine illustrates the importance of devoting some time after the revelation of the result***

Schulien, Matt. The Magic of Matt Schulien by Philip Reed Willmarth - 1959. The Cards and the Cigarette; p. 100 to 106. A borrowed cigarette is broken into four pieces. After traveling under a card, the cigarette is restored and handed back to the owner of the cigarette. The pieces are ditched under the table.
Schwartz, Sam: Play it Again Sam, the close up magic of Sam Schwartz © 1977 by Sam Schwartz, offers Sam's routine "Chink-a-Dice" which had been published earlier in the Linking Ring magazine.

Stone, David: La Magie des pieces DVD Cocktail Matrix is a standing version of chink a chink with four silver and a penny using an extra coin (a double facer) as misdirection. Placing the last move in the spectator’s hand is interesting. & Made In France Lecture Notes: written description of Cocktail Matrix.

Thompson, Frank: The Pallbearers Review © May 1972. Frank’s Chink-A-Chink is a way ahead version using the TWO ahead principle (and six bottle caps, instead of the usual five)

Thompson, John: Polished Polish Prestidigitation. Jeff Busby 1981. p 29 Chink-A-Chink: John Thompson's superb handling of the original Max Malini routine & Greater Magic DVD #36 Our Best #3 Chink A Chink by Johnny Thompson & Commercial Classics of Magic Vol 2 DVD: Chink a Chink with EL variant of sliding the lumps (not credited) but I taught it to him when he came to Paris for my birthday and he taught me the one I’m using now, having only added the Charlie Miller - Scott York Diamond formation.

van Rhee, Tonny: Chink-a-Chink set

Watkins, Dan. Caplocation This e-Book with e-film performance offers an evolution of John Kennedy’s Translocaton effect.
1. No gaffed coins are used (Bottle caps are used).
2. It utilizes very easy to acquire, cheap “throw away” props.
3. Obvious and immediate application to restaurant/bar magicians.
4. No sliding coins (or caps): The hands cover the caps, and simply move away. The performer can literally step back from the table and allow the audience to take in the miracle if he desires. There is no need to have a soft surface to perform on.

Williamson, David. Floating Assembly. Williamson Wonders by Richard Kaufman. 1989. The routine uses only four coins and four cards which seem never to touch the cards. Richard Kaufman’s text is translated in French by Jean-Jacques Sanvert as « Les Merveilles de Williamson » par. Ed. Mayette Magie Moderne - 1994. p. 44 46 Assemblée Flottante.

Wonder, Tommy: Wandering Chimes © by Tommy Wonder and Aucke Van Dokum. The beautiful version of yet another historical master.

York, Scott. Scott York Lecture Magic Castle. page 41 Another Perspective on Chink-A-Chink. Using beer caps the routine brings in the Diamond formation created by Charlie Miller. Translation in French by Jean-Pierre Meunier, p. 18-19 de la Revue Arcane n° 45 de janvier 1987
Magic is the art of proving impossible things in parallel dimensions that can't be reached
trancework
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Did not see it mentioned in the thread but the David Roth CaC routine is available for download with proceeds going to the Japanese tsunami relief, here: http://www.thebluecrown.com/store/tricks......oth.html
trancework
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Correction, it's actually Copper Silver Transpo that has the donation. The CaC/Winged Sliver video is great.
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I like, as much as possible, to give justification to my props. The way that I did so with Chink-A-Chink is, I perform the routine with Ice Cubes. I manufacture soft resin Ice Cubes (Ice Cubes Across) that are very realistic. In my routine, I accidentally topple over my drink glass thus spilling the contents onto the table, the fake Ice Cubes - no drink. I then perform the routine and end by putting the Ice Cubes back into my glass. I include a fake water spill with the set that vanishes and is turned back into an Ice Cube (the fifth Ice Cube). I have my Ice Cubes Across (A new Chink-A-Chink routine) on my new web site at, AntonyGerard.com

I have been manufacturing my soft resin Ice Cubes since 2003.

Plus, I used to sell an effect titled, "Hippity Hop Hats". A Chink-A-Chink routine employing miniature top hats. At the end of my routine, I pull a sponge rabbit out of one of the hats. A lead in to a sponge routine. I plan to re-release my "Hippity Hop Hats" again later this year.
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I like the diamond position.
(York or )

As a harp player I have been using the mini harmonicas
which you can play notes. That's enough for ole Susanna to
Ode to Joy.

Harris
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So wasn't there a manufactured set of metal... oh, I don't know what they were supposed to be... weights maybe, as in weights you might put on an old balance scale? Like a cone with its pointy end chopped off, resulting in a flat top?

Four real (solid) ones, plus a hollow shell?

Did those just go away? Or are they still available anywhere?

Or might some enterprising machinist perhaps bring them back now? (Hint, hint...)

Or, if preferences now lean toward ice cubes or sugar cubes... how about a set with a nicely fitting shell cube?
For a supernatural chiller mixing magic (prestidigitation, legerdemain) with Magic (occultism, mysticism), check out my novel MAGIC: AN OCCULT THRILLER at http://www.amazon.com/Magic-Occult-Thriller-Reed-Hall/dp/1453874836
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Sugar cube shell.

I have thought of using 3 d printer.

No follow through
The mini harps was part of a close up blues brother thing
Started with changes appearing black thin tie from bow tie
and sunglasses

Coins and guitar picks were also manipulated.
H
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Antony Gerard
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Today the popular items to use are, wine corks, dice, bottle caps, brass weights, and coins.

Karnak said, "So wasn't there a manufactured set of metal... oh, I don't know what they were supposed to be... weights maybe, as in weights you might put on an old balance scale?" Pop Haydn performs and sells the brass weights that are manufactured by James Riser, and as far as I know, are still available at www.ScoundrelsStore.com

The following is a brief history of Chink-A-Chink from my Ice Cubes Across (A new Chink-A-Chink routine) instructions.

History: The Coins Across and Chink-A-Chink have been among my favorite routines since 1969. However, the original beginnings of the effect that we now know as Chink-A-Chink, dates back long before I started performing it. It was Sean McWeeney who brought to light the fact that the effect Chink-A-Chink, is a lot older than was previously thought. In fact, it has a history dating back to the early to middle 1800’s. Plus, in 1877, Edwin Sach’s published his variation of the effect in his book, “Sleight of Hand”. In his book, Edwin Sach’s used four sugar cubes for his Chink-A-Chink like routine. It was Hank Yoe who is reputed to have performed a Chink-A-Chink like routine with coins sometime in the late 1800’s to early 1900’s, and introduced the name Sympathetic Coins to the effect and to the magic community.

It was Max Malini, who popularized the effect in the early 1900’s. Malini used cut-down wine corks and is generally credited with naming the effect “Chink-A-Chink”. Later, Leo Horowitz took Malini's version, added changes of his own, and used covered sugar cubes. Many years later, Canadian magician Doug Henning, again modified the effect and performed Chink-A-Chink on television. Doug used seashells in his routine. Plus, Dutch magicians Fred Kaps and Tommy Wonder also performed and modified Chink-A-Chink to suit their own styles.

For many years, pre-fabricated Chink-A-Chink sets have been made available to the magic community. Besides myself (Antony Gerard), Auke van Dokkum of the Netherlands, François Danis of France, and Jim Riser of the United States have manufactured and supplied a variety of Chink-A-Chink sets. However, the trend over the past twenty years, has been towards justifiable items, instead of the metal towers that resemble nothing found in everyday life. Items like bottle caps, wine corks, dice, brass weights, coins, my miniature top hats, and my Ice Cubes are finding themselves being used instead of the artificial ones.

I first started manufacturing my resin Ice Cubes in 2003 and used them in my spilled cola glass joke. I did not start using them in my Ice Cubes Across routine until 2011. My Ice Cubes Across routine was inspired by my Coins Across routine that in turn was inspired by the “Four Coins to a Glass” routine as may be found on page #160 through page #164 in Modern Coin Magic by J. B. Bobo (1952).

Whenever I come up with a new routine, effect, prop, or idea, I also try to find other, nonstandard uses for it as was the case with my resin Ice Cubes. It took me over eight years to come up with an idea for them that did not entail one of my spill products. The thing that I like most about the Ice Cubes Across routine is, the fact that the performer is able to palm the Ice Cube from the table without touching the table. The Ice Cubes are about one inch tall and thus are able to be palmed while the performer’s hand is about an inch from the table top.

Ice Cubes Across is not the first routine that I came up with where the item to be palmed is palmed with the palming hand about an inch from the table top. In 1976, I created a routine that I titled, “Hippity Hop Hats”. It was a routine that employed miniature top hats in my “Coins Across” inspired routine. At the end of my “Hippity Hop Hats” routine, and as a segue into my Sponge Rabbit’s routine, I would pull a sponge rabbit out of one of the Top Hats. The following routine is nearly the same as Hippity Hop Hats, except Ice Cubes are used.

After performing my Ice Cubes Across routine, and after I dropped the Ice Cubes back into my glass, I would notice a water spill on the spot where I had dropped the Ice Cubes. Next, I would cover the spill with two playing cards, pick up the playing cards, and show that the water has vanished. The principle that I employed is, Jerry Andrus’ “Misers Miracle”. I.e.; The water spill was hidden behind the playing cards that I had picked up and shown fronts and backs to the spectators. Incidentally, the fake water spill is another one of my creations and is supplied with my Ice Cubes Across effect and routine.

Harris, mold making is my specialty and while at Magi-Fest, I was asked if I could make a Sugar Cube Shell. I said that I could, however, I did not think it necessary. Let me know if you are interest and I might make them. But because I have a very busy convention and lecture tour seasons coming up, and because I am already working on quite a few custom projects for others, it would be quite some time before I could start another project.
Antony Gerard
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I also used to perform a Chink-A-Chink routine with a selected playing card. I would have a card selected, tear the card into quarters, fold the quarters into little tents cards (A-Frame's), and perform my Chink-A-Chink routine with the four tent cards. At the end of the routine, the fourth tent piece refuses to join the other three at which time I hand the fourth piece to a spectator. At that time, I pick up the three tent card pieces and unfold them. The four pieces have been restored and the fourth piece, that the spectator has, fits perfectly. I first started performing the routine in 1978, however, I did not put this routine in print until 1982. The "Tent Cards" may be found in my book "Last Call" (1982 - Pages #53 through #56)
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