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Christopher Lyle
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From health.com


Some jobs are more depression prone than others. "There are certain aspects of any job that can contribute to or exacerbate depression," says Deborah Legge, a licensed mental health counselor in Buffalo. "Folks with the high-stress jobs have a greater chance of managing it if they take care of themselves and get the help they need."

Here are 10 fields (out of 21 major job categories) in which full-time workers are most likely to report an episode of major depression in a given year. But if you want to be a nurse (number four), it doesn't mean you should pick another profession.


1. Nursing Home/Child Care Workers
Personal-care providers top the list, with nearly 11 percent of people in this field reporting a bout of major depression. (The rate is 13 percent in the unemployed; 7 percent in the general population.)

A typical day can include feeding, bathing and caring for others who are "often incapable of expressing gratitude or appreciation ... because they are too ill or too young or they just aren't in the habit of it," says Christopher Willard, clinical psychologist at Tufts University and author of "Child's Mind." "It is stressful, seeing people sick and not getting a lot of positive reinforcement."

2. Food Service Staff
Ranking just below professional-care workers are the people who are serving the food at your favorite local digs. Waitstaff often get low pay and can have exhausting jobs with numerous people telling them what to do each day.

While 10 percent of workers in general reported an episode of major depression in the past year, almost 15 percent of women in this field did so. "This is often a very thankless job," Legge says. "People can be really rude and there is a lot of physical exertion. When people are depressed, it is hard to have energy and motivation -- when you have to be on, it is difficult."

3. Social Workers
It's probably not a huge surprise to find social workers near the top of this list. Dealing with abused children or families on the brink of every imaginable crisis -- combined with bureaucratic red tape -- can make for a demanding, stressful job that's often 24/7.

"There can be a culture that says that to do a good job, you have to work really hard and often make sacrifices," Willard says. "Because social workers work with people who are so needy, it can be hard to not sacrifice too much to the job. I see that happen a lot with social workers and other caring professions, and they get really burned out pretty quickly."

4. Health Care Workers
This includes doctors, nurses, therapists and other professions that attract people who might end up giving a lot without saving a little for themselves. Health care workers can have long, irregular hours and days in which other people's lives are literally in their hands. In other words, the stress can be off the charts.

"Every day they are seeing sickness, trauma and death and dealing with family members of patients," Willard says. "It can shade one's outlook on the whole that the world is a sadder place."


5. Artists, Entertainers, Writers
These jobs can bring irregular paychecks, uncertain hours and isolation. Creative people may also have higher rates of mood disorders; about 9 percent reported an episode of major depression in the previous year. In men, it's the job category most likely to be associated with an episode of major depression (nearly 7 percent in full-time workers). "One thing I see a lot in entertainers and artists is bipolar illness," says Legge. "There could be undiagnosed or untreated mood disorders in people who are artistic ... Depression is not uncommon to those who are drawn to work in the arts, and then the lifestyle contributes to it."


6. Teachers
The demands on teachers seem to be constantly growing. Many work after school and then take work home. In a lot of areas, they learn to do a lot with a little. "There are pressures from many different audiences -- the kids, their parents and the schools trying to meet standards, all [of which] have different demands," Willard says. "This can make it difficult for teachers to do their thing and remember the reason they got started in the field."

7. Administrative Support Staff
People in this field can suffer from a classic case of high demand, low control. They are on the front line, taking orders from all directions. But they are also at the bottom of the totem pole in terms of control and "everything filters down," according to Legge. They can have unpredictable days and may not be acknowledged for all of the work that they do to make life easier for everyone else.

8. Maintenance and Grounds Workers
How would you like to be called on only when something goes wrong? That's essentially what maintenance people deal with each day. They also have to work odd hours, seasonal or varied schedules, and frequent night shifts. They are often paid little for a tough job that can include cleaning up other people's messes. "There is also higher turnover. In terms of co-workers, they are often isolated, and it can be dangerous work," Willard says.

9. Financial Advisors and Accountants
Stress. Stress. Stress. Most people don't like dealing with their own retirement savings. So can you imagine handling thousands or millions of dollars for other people? "There is so much responsibility for other people's finances and no control of the market," Legge says. "There is guilt involved, and when [clients] are losing money, they probably have people screaming at them with regularity."


10. Salespeople
People who work in sales are No. 10 on the list, though there are a whole host of reasons why the job could contribute to depression. Many salespeople work on commission, meaning you never know exactly when your next paycheck is coming. They may travel and have to spend time away from home, family and friends. If they work independently, benefits may also be limited. "This uncertainty of income, tremendous pressure for results and long hours" can make for a high-stress occupation, Legge says.

---------------------------

Based on this, the only thing left to do is be independently wealthy and be retired. Still...I found this interesting.
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Christopher Lyle
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abc
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Oh my goodness. I have two jobs and both are on the list. Thank goodness I am not a depressed magic teacher trying to sell things to help the under-privileged as a social worker. Then I would be suicidal.
Many of those jobs could also be the most rewarding. I love teaching and don't think I will ever think of letting it go. The reasons mentioned for disliking it or causing depression are true, but the rewards are as great.
ed rhodes
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Me too! A magician who works at Wal*Mart. While I'm not a "traveling salesperson," just being at Wally World is depressing enough.
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mvmagic
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Geesh! I am a magician and a nurse! I guess I am headed for a double whammy!
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HerbLarry
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You are all doomed I say, doomed!
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critter
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Quote:
On 2010-12-15 09:11, Christopher Lyle wrote:
From health.com
1. Nursing Home/Child Care Workers
Personal-care providers top the list, with nearly 11 percent of people in this field reporting a bout of major depression. (The rate is 13 percent in the unemployed; 7 percent in the general population.)

A typical day can include feeding, bathing and caring for others who are "often incapable of expressing gratitude or appreciation ... because they are too ill or too young or they just aren't in the habit of it," says Christopher Willard, clinical psychologist at Tufts University and author of "Child's Mind." "It is stressful, seeing people sick and not getting a lot of positive reinforcement."


I'm number 1! I'm number 1! Ok, not anymore. I chose not to go back after my surgery from being injured by a resident's con. I've never seen so many miserable people as when I was a nursing assistant, and I'm just talking about my co-workers! Horrible job. And, at least for a CNA, the pay is barely more than minimum wage. Seems like the less money someone makes the harder they have to work to get it.

Quote:
5. Artists, Entertainers, Writers
These jobs can bring irregular paychecks, uncertain hours and isolation. Creative people may also have higher rates of mood disorders; about 9 percent reported an episode of major depression in the previous year. In men, it's the job category most likely to be associated with an episode of major depression (nearly 7 percent in full-time workers). "One thing I see a lot in entertainers and artists is bipolar illness," says Legge. "There could be undiagnosed or untreated mood disorders in people who are artistic ... Depression is not uncommon to those who are drawn to work in the arts, and then the lifestyle contributes to it."



I remember talking about this one in my abnormal psych class. My prof said we're more prone to milder forms of schizophrenia too SmileGood stuff.
"The fool is one who doesn't know what you have just found out."
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Dannydoyle
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I must say that the list is put together by someone with an opinion going into it. It takes a certain type of person to do each job on the list. Some are better suited to each job than others. Hooray for diversity!
Danny Doyle
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George Ledo
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Quote:
On 2010-12-15 09:11, Christopher Lyle wrote:
5. Artists, Entertainers, Writers
These jobs can bring irregular paychecks, uncertain hours and isolation. Creative people may also have higher rates of mood disorders; about 9 percent reported an episode of major depression in the previous year. In men, it's the job category most likely to be associated with an episode of major depression (nearly 7 percent in full-time workers). "One thing I see a lot in entertainers and artists is bipolar illness," says Legge. "There could be undiagnosed or untreated mood disorders in people who are artistic ... Depression is not uncommon to those who are drawn to work in the arts, and then the lifestyle contributes to it."


No argument here, and I'm guessing (betting?) that there have been major studies on this.

However, from my own personal experience, and not being a shrink (and grossly over-simplifying the issue), I have to believe that depression in creative types comes from simply not being prepared for the reality of that lifestyle. We were never trained for it in school. We never learned about the business side of the job, like budgeting, sales, promotion, saving, looking for work, and all that fun stuff. A lot of us also never learned to work on a team, or to lead, or follow, or delegate, or plan.

I spent seven years in college and grad school, in two professional training programs in theatrical design. The only reason I ever got into budgeting and buying stuff was that I was the resident assistant scenic designer, and even then I was only minimally involved. It wasn't until later, when I went into architecture, that I really started to learn about budgeting, planning, playing on a team, hearing "no," and so forth. Nowadays I'm a lot more chilled out as a designer than I was in school because of what I learned in architecture, and I don't get frustrated, for instance, if the client says he can't afford a specific piece: I just work with him or her to maintain the design intent while reducing the price. For me, that's part of being creative. It's also part of the business.
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critter
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That's part of it George, but studies on personality traits have also shown that those scoring high in neuroticism also tend to score high in creativity. There is a strong correlation, though we all know that isn't equal to causation.
This is a good little article on the subject, not the be-all/end-all, but a good little article:
http://talentdevelop.com/articlelive/art......ge1.html
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George Ledo
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Quote:
On 2010-12-15 15:14, critter wrote:
That's part of it George, but studies on personality traits have also shown that those scoring high in neuroticism also tend to score high in creativity. There is a strong correlation, though we all know that isn't equal to causation.
This is a good little article on the subject, not the be-all/end-all, but a good little article:
http://talentdevelop.com/articlelive/art......ge1.html

I AM NOT NEUROTIC!!!!! Smile

Thanks for the link; I'll take a look at it later today.
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balducci
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My job, well, one of them, anyway, is the top job of 2011.

http://money.usnews.com/money/careers/ar......ary.html

So, LOL.

Actually, in a sense and because I multitask, I have 3 jobs and all 3 of them are typically in the top 10 list. No wonder I am always so happy and upbeat.
Make America Great Again! - Trump in 2020 ... "We're a capitalistic society. I go into business, I don't make it, I go bankrupt. They're not going to bail me out. I've been on welfare and food stamps. Did anyone help me? No." - Craig T. Nelson, actor.
George Ledo
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Hi, critter,

I read the article you mentioned; it's interesting, although I find it fascinating how many generalizations the writer includes in the piece. For instance:

"Psychologists believe that all highly creative individuals have certain common personality traits."

"4. Non-conformity - The creative process itself is an act of non-conformity so creative individuals are non-conformists and unconventional."

"14. Charm - The genius is usually characterized by a humorous nature, extreme charm and personal attractiveness and a 'presence' that makes them popular and attractive to all sorts of people."

"17. Disorder - A love for disorder is common among all creative people as they are apparently bored with order or any predictable course of events."

"19. Loneliness - The creative individual is usually a loner and according to psychoanalysis, also a neurotic. The genius is perennially isolated from society and being very uncomfortable with social norms, they tend to avoid social interaction. Political and social leaders are however more socially active than the creative artist and writer, although some tend to lead reclusive lives."

From my own experience, I suspect that the writer and his sources may be confusing a "creative" individual with an "artistic" individual in several parts of the article. Granted it's a short article, but, if he's going to write it, I think he should be clear on the difference between the two.
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MagicSanta
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Made up list. I've known people in a number of those fields, my wife is a retired teacher in fact, and they were happy with their careers.
Jonathan Townsend
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Teaching grammar and ISO product life cycle documentation practices to engineers. Smile
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MagicSanta
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Hey! As an ISO dude I don't agree!
Jonathan Townsend
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Sometimes I wonder if the folks at work could get a bottle called "Q" that they could spray onto boxes after they're packed - they'd use it. Q, the smell of quality. Maybe there's a market for that - like new car smell.
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MagicSanta
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I was at a company for a few months, a criminal group of morons, who had a 70% failure rate and didn't see why that might be a problem and why they didn't make money.
George Ledo
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Quote:
On 2010-12-15 22:26, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
Sometimes I wonder if the folks at work could get a bottle called "Q" that they could spray onto boxes after they're packed - they'd use it. Q, the smell of quality. Maybe there's a market for that - like new car smell.

Yeah, but what would it smell like?
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critter
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Quote:
On 2010-12-15 21:42, George Ledo wrote:
Hi, critter,

I read the article you mentioned; it's interesting, although I find it fascinating how many generalizations the writer includes in the piece. For instance:

"Psychologists believe that all highly creative individuals have certain common personality traits."

"4. Non-conformity - The creative process itself is an act of non-conformity so creative individuals are non-conformists and unconventional."

"14. Charm - The genius is usually characterized by a humorous nature, extreme charm and personal attractiveness and a 'presence' that makes them popular and attractive to all sorts of people."

"17. Disorder - A love for disorder is common among all creative people as they are apparently bored with order or any predictable course of events."

"19. Loneliness - The creative individual is usually a loner and according to psychoanalysis, also a neurotic. The genius is perennially isolated from society and being very uncomfortable with social norms, they tend to avoid social interaction. Political and social leaders are however more socially active than the creative artist and writer, although some tend to lead reclusive lives."

From my own experience, I suspect that the writer and his sources may be confusing a "creative" individual with an "artistic" individual in several parts of the article. Granted it's a short article, but, if he's going to write it, I think he should be clear on the difference between the two.


Yeah, it wasn't a perfect article, but it hit a couple of points I've read about in case studies so I thought it was a decent overview.
"The fool is one who doesn't know what you have just found out."
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Pakar Ilusi
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Are you guys depressed being Magicians right now?
"Dreams aren't a matter of Chance but a matter of Choice." -DC-
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