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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » The size of your brain’s visual centre affects how you see the world (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

panlives
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http://tinyurl.com/23qez2q

[excerpt]
These results are the first to show that a purely physical aspect of the brain – the surface area of V1 – can predict the nature of a subjective conscious experience. That raises several interesting questions. For a start, some cultures like the Himba people of Namibia are less vulnerable to the Ebbinghaus illusion than English people are. Autistic people and very young children are similarly resistant. Could this reflect differences in the physical organisation of their brain? Only more research will tell.
For the moment, the results remind us that none of us perceives the world around us in quite the same way. Two people can look at the exact same image and see different things. Just as our thoughts and emotions differ from person to person, so do our senses.
"Is there any point to which you would wish to draw my attention?"
"To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time."
"The dog did nothing in the night-time."
"That was the curious incident," remarked Sherlock Holmes.
Steve_Mollett
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Eh, so I've made
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Which is why much of what we call reality is subjective; each of us strains it through a different filter.
Author of: GARROTE ESCAPES
The absurd is the essential concept and the first truth.
- Albert Camus
S2000magician
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When I was in high school the physics textbook we used had a number of comic strips scattered through it, mostly The Wizard of Id and B.C. One of the B.C. strips addressed a topic such as this. I paraphrase (and, having forgotten exactly who was speaking, choose B.C. and Peter as the characters):

B.C.: I wonder if everyone sees colors the same way. I may look at something and see one color, and you might see another color, be we both call the color we see by the same name.

Peter: That's ridiculous!

B.C.: OK. I'll prove it to you. See that rock? What color is it?

Peter: Gray.

B.C.: Wrong!
Jonathan Townsend
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Quote:
On 2010-12-24 09:04, Steve_Mollett wrote:
Which is why much of what we call reality is subjective; each of us strains it through a different filter.


Still presuming there's an 'it'.
Let that go and modern physics starts to make sense.
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kcg5
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who wants four fried chickens and a coke
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The size of the hands of a person affects how they palm a basketball
Nobody expects the spanish inquisition!!!!!



"History will be kind to me, as I intend to write it"- Sir Winston Churchill
Jonathan Townsend
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Maybe I missed it - how did they correct for the age/experience with perspective in representation and design as a factor in responses?
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Magnus Eisengrim
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The result, while interesting, is FAR too modest to allow large-scale inferences about differences in how we perceive the world. I'm still prepared to accept that we experience physical reality very nearly equivalently to each other human.

S2000's version of the "inverted qualia" problem is nice. It is a philosophical puzzle how we can know that we all (with functioning visual apparatus) experience blue the same way. But given the options

1. All normally functioning humans experience the colours roughly the same way, and
2. All normally functioning humans experience the colours differently,

I'll stick with #1 because it makes more genetic sense. In the absence of other information, it's a pretty sound default position.

John
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
Jonathan Townsend
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Quote:
On 2010-12-24 12:10, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:...we experience physical reality very nearly equivalently to each other human....


It gets interesting when all we have are stimuli to present and responses to measure or record.
Is the glass half full or half empty? Which way is the Necker cube going at the moment? Which way is the shadow ballerina spinning?

Then we get to more complex interpretive responses - why does one piece of cloth get treated differently than some other similarly shaped piece of cloth?
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Magnus Eisengrim
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Quote:
On 2010-12-24 12:17, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
Quote:
On 2010-12-24 12:10, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:...we experience physical reality very nearly equivalently to each other human....


It gets interesting when all we have are stimuli to present and responses to measure or record.
Is the glass half full or half empty? Which way is the Necker cube going at the moment? Which way is the shadow ballerina spinning?

Then we get to more complex interpretive responses - why does one piece of cloth get treated differently than some other similarly shaped piece of cloth?


Now there we have an area of interest!
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
landmark
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Attention.
Why there?
Why now?
Perception is always a selective process.
Jonathan Townsend
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A. C. Clarke remarked that invisibility, if we achieve a means to it, may well come to happen by way of attention rather than any direct physical process.

There's also some very strange stuff happening with afterimages and between separate eye images.
Vision, perception and cognition are subjects of interest here.
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panlives
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Quote:
On 2010-12-24 13:57, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
A. C. Clarke remarked that invisibility, if we achieve a means to it, may well come to happen by way of attention rather than any direct physical process.

There's also some very strange stuff happening with afterimages and between separate eye images.
Vision, perception and cognition are subjects of interest here.


Mr. T.,

Can you expand on "between separate eye images"?

with thanks,
"Is there any point to which you would wish to draw my attention?"
"To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time."
"The dog did nothing in the night-time."
"That was the curious incident," remarked Sherlock Holmes.
Jonathan Townsend
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Sure, attend how you view things through a relatively small vertical gap. The shifting of your attention between your eyes.

I also found the afterimage effect as an aspect of edge/feature detection interesting.

There's one more effect that sometimes surprises me, that of a small light which is on yet in peripheral rather than central vision.
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panlives
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Quote:
On 2010-12-27 15:14, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
Sure, attend how you view things through a relatively small vertical gap. The shifting of your attention between your eyes.




Saccadic eye movements?
"Is there any point to which you would wish to draw my attention?"
"To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time."
"The dog did nothing in the night-time."
"That was the curious incident," remarked Sherlock Holmes.
Jonathan Townsend
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I believe saccades are eyeball movements.
Not sure if they are associated with shifts between eye in attention.
on saccades: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saccade
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tommy
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I have an idea. We could invent a ruler.
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
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