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The Burnaby Kid
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Quote:
On 2011-08-06 14:05, magicfish wrote:
Quote:
On 2011-08-06 05:16, Andrew Musgrave wrote:
Quote:
On 2011-08-05 22:13, magicfish wrote:
For the most part, ive never found a video lesson of a sleight that can come close to a written description by a good technical writer accompanied by good illustrations.


Wait wait wait wait... hold the phone... You needed illustrations?

absolutely! A good illustrator can make all the difference in the world, Andrew.
And an illustrator who knows the move well can select just the right moments of a sleight to freeze on the page. Richard Kaufman is very good at this.


But why would you require a visual element, magicfish? Earlier you were talking about the power of the written word alone to put all the visuals you needed into your imagination.

Quote:
On 2011-08-04 22:55, magicfish wrote:
... a talented author can absolutely create an image in your head as to how it should look.
A screed for scams, sorcery, and other shenanigans... Nu Way Magick Blogge

JACK, the Jolly Almanac of Card Knavery, a free card magic resource for beginners.
magicfish
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Hang on Andrew, in my first few posts I conceded that sometimes seeing how a move looked couls be helpful. I found Gary Ouellete's companion video to his book Closeup Illusions to be very helpful in this regard.
mike greene
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A few people have used the analogy of a book being made into a film, and the book being better than the film.

However, Im not so sure this works. Take for example, the Narnia books. For me the beauty of reading the books over the film is that you can imagine Narnia to be however you want, based on what is written. We all read the description and we all imagine what it looks like, so it will be slightly different and personal to each of us.

But does this work with card sleights? Ten people may read a description of the classic pass and perform it ten different ways. The harsh reality of it is that some of those people will be doing it well and some of them won't. If certain aspects are not explained properly and we leave them to ourselves to fill in the blanks, as it were, some of us will do it wrong!

With DVDs this is not an issue, but it's also not an issue with properly described and illustrated books, The problem is that not all books (particularly old texts) are clearly descriped and/illustrated.
ALL I NEED IS ONE LIFE, ONE TRY, ONE BREATH, I'M ONE MAN, WHAT I STAND FOR SPEAKS FOR ITSELF - NAS
Cain
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Quote:
On 2011-08-06 14:50, mike greene wrote:
A few people have used the analogy of a book being made into a film, and the book being better than the film.


And it's a false analogy. First, books and films are different mediums. There are certain things books can do better than movies and vice-versa. Since film, like magic, is a visual medium, it struggles to get inside a character's head, so the writer/director is often reduced to a clumsy technique such as voice-over. Some stories are just better left to books, either because it simply "does not play" or because the book is too long, which leads to another point: the reason Hollywood adapts so many books in the first place is because each second of screen time is $$$$$, and increasingly risk-averse financiers prefer a proven pre-existing property (comic books, foreign films, true stories, old television shows).

So a better comparison than books to films would be scripts to films. Established producers and actors pass on good scripts all the time (the same way magicians overlook strong items on the page). It takes someone with "vision" to be able to see the page up on the big screen.
Here are a few lines from the script for a famous film:

Quote:
It is late, the supermarket all but deserted. We are tracking
In on a fortyish man in Bermuda shorts and sunglasses at the
dairy case. He is the Dude. His rumpled look and relaxed
manner suggest a man in whom casualness runs deep.


Strong writing, but it's not immediately obvious there's magic here.

Quote:
The Dude glances furtively about and then opens a quart of
milk. He sticks his nose in the spout and sniffs.
...
The Dude, peeking over his shades, scribbles something at
the little customer's lectern. Milk beads his mustache.
...
The Dude has his Ralph's Shopper's Club card to one side and
is making out a check to Ralph's for sixty-nine cents.


Read a script after you've seen the movie and it makes perfect sense -- the way the actors brought the characters to life, the set design, sharp editing, swelling music.

Why don't we just read the screenplays rather than watch the movies?
Ellusionst discussing the Arcane Playing cards: "Michaelangelo took four years to create the Sistine Chapel masterpiece... these took five."

Calvin from Calvin and Hobbes: "You know Einstein got bad grades as a kid? Well, mine are even worse!"
bblumen
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Quote:
On 2011-08-06 13:48, Andrew Musgrave wrote:
[snip]

So... SEEING it done helped you understand and appreciate the effect that was possible by the technique?

[snip]



No. I didn't see a thing.

By not seeing, that is what led me to the books.
"Lulling the minds of your company is more important than dazzling their eyes." Ed Marlo
The Burnaby Kid
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Oh come on. You saw the card go into the center, you saw nothing of consequence, and then you saw the card on the top, right? The point is you were there and witnessed it. You didn't read about the event in a book somewhere.

That whole "nothing of consequence" thing counts. It's what one aims for when trying to perfect the pass.
A screed for scams, sorcery, and other shenanigans... Nu Way Magick Blogge

JACK, the Jolly Almanac of Card Knavery, a free card magic resource for beginners.
Harry Lorayne
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I guess this pertains to this thread - for those who are at all interested, a friend has put up eight of the routines I do on Vol. 1 of my "Best Ever" 4-volume DVD set. If you want to see them, go to http://www.youtube.com/harrylorayneonvideo Click "for all" or scroll down and on the left is a list of the eight items. Hope you enjoy. Best - Harry L.
[email]harrylorayne@earthlink.net[/email]

http://www.harrylorayne.com
http://www.harryloraynemagic.com
Harry Lorayne
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Want to take a moment to thank nooner (Jim Noon) for putting up that YouTube site. Harry L.
[email]harrylorayne@earthlink.net[/email]

http://www.harrylorayne.com
http://www.harryloraynemagic.com
RS1963
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Quote:
On 2011-08-06 20:04, bblumen wrote:
Quote:
On 2011-08-06 13:48, Andrew Musgrave wrote:
[snip]

So... SEEING it done helped you understand and appreciate the effect that was possible by the technique?

[snip]



No. I didn't see a thing.

By not seeing, that is what led me to the books.


I'm not sure but I think what Andrew is trying to show you is that. From your seeing the pass done first and how it looked like nothing was done to make the card jump to the top of the deck when it happened. You obviously seen it done very well so that gave you the knowledge of what a very well executed pass should look like. That also helped you once you started reading and stuyding the pass. Andrew is not wrong in anything he was saying to you. Of course as you're going to say to me as you told Ben in another thread "False"
SteveFromSpokane
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Quote:
On 2011-08-06 05:16, Andrew Musgrave wrote:
Quote:
On 2011-08-05 22:13, magicfish wrote:
For the most part, ive never found a video lesson of a sleight that can come close to a written description by a good technical writer accompanied by good illustrations.


Wait wait wait wait... hold the phone... You needed illustrations?


Speaking of illustrations. One of my major pet peeves is the poor quality of illustrations in books and some magic instructions.
Often I will redraw the illustrations as I happen to have a very good artistic talent too.
I mean, come on guys, find a good artist , not someone who took a art class in high school for your illustrations.

I once bought a magic trick from Hank's and the illustrations were so pitiful I sent it back to him and told him to keep it as it was no use to me.
Didn't even ask for my money back. Just told him to see if he could make out what the illustrations was trying to say. They spent more money and time on the magic ad than they did the product.
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