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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » The Prestige (2 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Sean-Paul
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Ooohh "is anybody there" Michael Cain Movie is available streaming on Netflix!
satellite23
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Just got wind that a New Line Cinema comedy starring Steve Carrell will start being made soon. It will be about David Copperfield apparently.
JasonbytheOcean
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Re: the critiques about the effects in the Illusionist, the commentary on the DVD is worth listening if you like magic history, and they address some of the criticisms noted in this thread. Basically, they decided for artistic reasons to use tricks performed at the time the movie was set, but to add an edge to them that goes beyond what we can realistically do in a live performance. I didn't see it as a problem, I thought the film was a fun period piece.

BTW, another movie about magic worth watching that came out in recent years is "The Great Buck Howard," featuring John Malkovich portraying a mentalist who's clearly based on Kreskin.
ViolinKing
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"Magicians" 2007 if anyone is interested in a quirky comedy. Probably more accurate than the Prestige or Illusionist in terms of magic which can be performed.
jasonmcconnie
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Fantastic film. The Prestige accurately paints the mood of magic in that era.
PendletonThe3rd
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The Prestige is a great film and got me into the author of the book that inspired it, Christopher Priest.

Each book this guys writes is a complete mind f#*k like the Prestige was. And like a good magician, he misdirects the reader throughout each novel. And when you finally realize the rug has been pulled from under you, your not quite sure what to make it of all.

I can't recommend this author enough especially to those on this site who would appreciate this kind of book. He truly is a novelist's version of a magician (if that makes any sense).

In fact, he actually wrote a new book that just came out this month called The Adjacent which does all the things mentioned above. And even has some magicians in it like the Prestige (and written as though he is well versed on the subject). He hasn't quite broken through here yet but you can get his books from amazon uk.

Anyway, don't mean to get too off topic but it is related.

Back to the Prestige. I agree with what someone else here said about how the movie really does portray the obsession with secrets that can occur in this crazy game called magic (and beyond). But it also goes on to show how methods can be taken too far. And at what cost...
morro3
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Wow, thank you Christopher Priest for mentioning that author, I have never heard of Christopher Priest before. If his other novels are any similar to The Prestige they must be good.d

In terms of the movie itself I watched it 3 times already since it was released in 2006. Last time quite recently actually. I really love this kind of devotion to the art of magic they showed. It was quite strong I agree but it was great to experience that. I do not want to spoil anything so I won't go into much details.I will just say, it was so inspiring for me. I can't recommend it enough to magicians.

When it comes to the terms I have never heard of them either. However I do like the sound of prestige as a name for the final revelation so to speak.

cheers
satellite23
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Quote:
On 2013-07-22 02:07, PendletonThe3rd wrote:
The Prestige is a great film and got me into the author of the book that inspired it, Christopher Priest.

Each book this guys writes is a complete mind f#*k like the Prestige was. And like a good magician, he misdirects the reader throughout each novel. And when you finally realize the rug has been pulled from under you, your not quite sure what to make it of all.

I can't recommend this author enough especially to those on this site who would appreciate this kind of book. He truly is a novelist's version of a magician (if that makes any sense).

In fact, he actually wrote a new book that just came out this month called The Adjacent which does all the things mentioned above. And even has some magicians in it like the Prestige (and written as though he is well versed on the subject). He hasn't quite broken through here yet but you can get his books from amazon uk.


That is quite interesting. I've never heard of Christopher Priest. In fact, I didn't even know that the Prestige was based off one of his books. I'll have to check him out later.
Payne
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Quote:
On 2013-07-22 09:04, satellite23 wrote:

That is quite interesting. I've never heard of Christopher Priest. In fact, I didn't even know that the Prestige was based off one of his books. I'll have to check him out later.



I wouldn't bother. It's a horrible book. almost as bad as the movie. I couldn't even finish it. I found the voice that the "found diaries and letters" were written in far too modern. The authour really needed to sit down and read Dracula or old newspapers to learn how Victorian correspondance was composed. I liked the general idea of the story. It's just that its execution was poor.
"America's Foremost Satirical Magician" -- Jeff McBride.
satellite23
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Quote:
On 2013-07-22 10:51, Payne wrote:
Quote:
On 2013-07-22 09:04, satellite23 wrote:

That is quite interesting. I've never heard of Christopher Priest. In fact, I didn't even know that the Prestige was based off one of his books. I'll have to check him out later.


I wouldn't bother. It's a horrible book. almost as bad as the movie. I couldn't even finish it. I found the voice that the "found diaries and letters" were written in far too modern. The authour really needed to sit down and read Dracula or old newspapers to learn how Victorian correspondance was composed. I liked the general idea of the story. It's just that its execution was poor.


I was almost expecting you to say that you were joking at the end....

Haha if the book is anything like the movie, then I'll love it!
Payne
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On 2013-07-22 22:23, satellite23 wrote:
I was almost expecting you to say that you were joking at the end....

Haha if the book is anything like the movie, then I'll love it!


Not joking at all. Hated the movie, hated the book. Hard to tell which one I disliked more. Probably the book as it was so poorly written. The movie at least was fairly well executed. It just lacked a script and compelling characters. The only thing I liked about it was David Bowie portraying Tesla and the scenes in his lab. The rest of the film was a complete waste of time.
"America's Foremost Satirical Magician" -- Jeff McBride.
Stevie Tricker
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Satellite23 if you liked the film then I'd be surprised if you didn't dig the book, its one of the few that I've read after seeing the film and liked more. I feel the overall plot is more engaging due to being set over a grander timescale, covering what happened to the machine and the affect on their descendants who are still feuding.

I have no reference point for what Victorian correspondence should look like so this did not detract from my enjoyment of the book.
dykstraj99
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I saw the movie and really liked it. I then got the book but didn't think it was as good as the movie. I think that the movie plot is so good and well written to reflect the "three parts to a good magic trick.....the pledge, the turn, and the prestige."
george1953
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I watched this after hearing about it here. Quite a good movie, an enjoyable watch but I wouldnt want to watch it again.
By failing to prepare, we are preparing to fail.
MRSharpe
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The prestige is a terrible movie if you want to watch a movie about magic. If you want to watch a movie that movie producers think is about magic well then go ahead. Why they have to keep making movies that imply that there are magicians who do 'fake' magic and then there are a few who either do 'real magic' and just let the public think they are magicians is a mystery to me. In the case of Prestige, they have to turn to a scientist to do 'real magic' and although Tesla was an amazing person (and quite eccentric to boot) he was never involved in producing a magic effect. For example, ion the movie they imply that magicians who do dove work kill the doves when they make them vanish actually kill the birds every time! That is simply ludicrous! There may have been some real hacks (no pun intended) who made birds vanish in this manner, but not many. It would be impractical to raise and tour with enough birds to get through a month of shows at Tesla's time. An example of something from the history of movie production that actually happened more than we would like to admit today was the amount of child molestation that used to go on in Hollywood. Remember the scenes in the Godfather where the big Hollywood director was giving a birthday party for the young starlet? There was another scene that was cut from the film at his house that implied that she was living there and that they were sharing a bed. Would it have made the movie better to let everyone know that this happened even once in the movie business? No! But my point isn't to educate you about the tawdry underbelly of the movie business, just to say that the movie wasn't any better for telling a falsehood about magicians. Another example is the vanishing bird cage. The high tension apparatus shown in the movie was never needed to do the vanishing bird cage. The apparatus shown used to exist, but not for the vanishing birdcage and the actual apparatus wasn't a powerful as it is implied. The props guys for the movie found an illustration in an old magic book and adapted it for the movie. But what they show it doing to a spectator makes magicians look heartless and wasn't necessary. Finally, to quote a recent post on Facebook, "When is Hollywood going to get some magicians to advise on a movie about magicians and then pay attention to what they say so that they don't make us all look like fools or idiots?" This was said about Now You See me and it holds for Prestige too. Big TT down!
Custom Props Designer and Fabricator as well as Performer from Indiana, USA
satellite23
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Quote:
On 2013-07-24 01:49, MRSharpe wrote:
The prestige is a terrible movie if you want to watch a movie about magic. If you want to watch a movie that movie producers think is about magic well then go ahead. Why they have to keep making movies that imply that there are magicians who do 'fake' magic and then there are a few who either do 'real magic' and just let the public think they are magicians is a mystery to me. In the case of Prestige, they have to turn to a scientist to do 'real magic' and although Tesla was an amazing person (and quite eccentric to boot) he was never involved in producing a magic effect. For example, ion the movie they imply that magicians who do dove work kill the doves when they make them vanish actually kill the birds every time! That is simply ludicrous! There may have been some real hacks (no pun intended) who made birds vanish in this manner, but not many. It would be impractical to raise and tour with enough birds to get through a month of shows at Tesla's time. An example of something from the history of movie production that actually happened more than we would like to admit today was the amount of child molestation that used to go on in Hollywood. Remember the scenes in the Godfather where the big Hollywood director was giving a birthday party for the young starlet? There was another scene that was cut from the film at his house that implied that she was living there and that they were sharing a bed. Would it have made the movie better to let everyone know that this happened even once in the movie business? No! But my point isn't to educate you about the tawdry underbelly of the movie business, just to say that the movie wasn't any better for telling a falsehood about magicians. Another example is the vanishing bird cage. The high tension apparatus shown in the movie was never needed to do the vanishing bird cage. The apparatus shown used to exist, but not for the vanishing birdcage and the actual apparatus wasn't a powerful as it is implied. The props guys for the movie found an illustration in an old magic book and adapted it for the movie. But what they show it doing to a spectator makes magicians look heartless and wasn't necessary. Finally, to quote a recent post on Facebook, "When is Hollywood going to get some magicians to advise on a movie about magicians and then pay attention to what they say so that they don't make us all look like fools or idiots?" This was said about Now You See me and it holds for Prestige too. Big TT down!


It's called willing suspension of disbelief Smile
Payne
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On 2013-07-24 13:53, satellite23 wrote:

It's called willing suspension of disbelief Smile



Some are more willing than others. It wasn't the inaccurate representation of magic and magicians that caused me to dislike this film. it was that it violated one of the primary rules of storytelling. For a tale to be compelling you have to care about at least one of the characters. The director or scriptwriter or both managed to concoct a picture where you didn't care what happened to either of the two loser prestidigitator's at the end, middle or beginning of the film.
"America's Foremost Satirical Magician" -- Jeff McBride.
Magic Pierre
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I hate to agree, but I just hated this movie. When I got to the end and the "gimmick" was revealed my jaw landed in my lap and I simply thought "REALLY!? That's it?". Utter crap. I enjoyed "Now You See Me" much more, and "The Magical Mentors of Ricky Jay" even more than that. I was really disappointed we couldn't round up the 80 people we needed to get a screening of "Desperate Acts of Magic". That looks good. But "The Prestige"? Yecchh!
PendletonThe3rd
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Quote:
On 2013-07-24 15:12, Payne wrote:
Quote:
On 2013-07-24 13:53, satellite23 wrote:

It's called willing suspension of disbelief Smile



Some are more willing than others. It wasn't the inaccurate representation of magic and magicians that caused me to dislike this film. it was that it violated one of the primary rules of storytelling. For a tale to be compelling you have to care about at least one of the characters. The director or scriptwriter or both managed to concoct a picture where you didn't care what happened to either of the two loser prestidigitator's at the end, middle or beginning of the film.


But you must have liked it enough to then try to read the book afterwards? Granted you say, ultimately, you weren't a fan of the book either which is fine but if you didn't like the movie to begin with, why attempt the book?

Not trying to be a smart ass, you're certainly entitled to your view (no one thing can win em all), but it seems like you really have it out for both the film and book.

To be fair, while it may not be for you (and some of the others that have weighed in with similar reactions), at the end of the day, the movie indexed pretty well on Rotten Tomatoe's and the book has four out 5 stars on Amazon's reader reviews...so there is SOME enjoyment to be had in them.
Payne
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On 2013-07-24 17:30, PendletonThe3rd wrote:

But you must have liked it enough to then try to read the book afterwards? Granted you say, ultimately, you weren't a fan of the book either which is fine but if you didn't like the movie to begin with, why attempt the book?

Not trying to be a smart ass, you're certainly entitled to your view (no one thing can win em all), but it seems like you really have it out for both the film and book.

To be fair, while it may not be for you (and some of the others that have weighed in with similar reactions), at the end of the day, the movie indexed pretty well on Rotten Tomatoe's and the book has four out 5 stars on Amazon's reader reviews...so there is SOME enjoyment to be had in them.


I only read the book because a friend lent it to me. It really was poorly written and I'm really not sure what Hollywood saw in it. But then I have the same opinion on "Carter Beats the Devil" which I couldn't bring myself to finish because of the historical inaccuracies and poorly realized or interpreted characters.
"America's Foremost Satirical Magician" -- Jeff McBride.
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