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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Finger/stage manipulation » » It's in your other hand, Dad. (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

ftlum
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Roseville, CA
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Well, it looks like I've got a LOT more practice to do. I found it's hard to fool my 6 year old with 2" billiard balls (well, I did just start learning the moves with these balls, so I guess I shouldn't expect too much right away). The balls tougher than I thought to hide. She can sometimes see the balls palmed. It might also be her height / angle is bad too-- she's watching me in the den, not on a stage. Plus, it doesn't help that I've got mirrors in my room. Smile.

Compared to coins, it's definitely tougher to do vanishes since it can be fairly obvious where a 2" ball would go: if not in one hand... . I did try topiting it, but she still sort of figured it out. (I haven't shown her moves with the sh**l yet-- I'm going to practice some more first.) I'll show my wife the routine after I REALLY practice-- that'll be a better test.

Anyway, my question is-- what other non-sh**l methods are there for complete vanishes of a single ball (aside from a topit)? I've got the Levent and Wright DVDs but they really don't cover that and Levent was generally against a certain way of handwashing. 2" Fakini balls won't be sleeve-able. I'm guessing it's attitude / acting, that would sell it more than anything else.

thanks in advance,

- Frank
hugmagic
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You are right in that your daughter has a different height (ie angle) than most. With a 2" ball, the rotation of the wrists are very important to properly conceal the ball.

Levent is one of the best sources on using the larger balls as he uses even larger ones. Watch how he hold his wrists and his acting to sell the vanishes.

I was fortunate to see Bill Baird work with 2" Fakini's. He was not in his prime but the genius was still there. Acting is a very, very large part of it.

Geoffrey Buckingham's "Easier than the Think" has some non shell methods, I believe.

Richard
Richard E. Hughes, Hughes Magic Inc., 352 N. Prospect St., Ravenna, OH 44266 (330)296-4023
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Anatole
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In the chapter "The Magic State of Mind" of Henry Hay's _The Amateur Magician's Handbook_, the author writes (page 3 of the expanded 1965 edition):
-----begin quote-----
You have a silver dollar in your hand. Your hand does gently down, then sharply up. "Toss!" says association, and orders all eyes to the ceiling. The spectator with a particularly agile, well-trained mind will actually see the dollar gleam as it flies upward.
His two-year-old son, having less than a tenth of his father's practice at association, is not so smart; he sees no dollar at all after your hand starts down. Instead, he may even see your fingers pressing the dollar into your palm, where it sticks while the adults are gaping at the ceiling.
(This, incidentally, is why you had better give juvenile audiences a wide berth until you have grown old and hardened in wizardry. The loveable kiddies have too few associations and no inhibitions.)
-----end quote-----

I am guessing, too, that your vanish of the two-inch ball was done "close-up." I would restrict any billiard ball sleights, especially with two-inch balls--to platform work, not the living room.

Have you done a basic sponge ball routine routine for your daughter? That moment when the ball vanishes and reappears in her hand is pretty much the nearest thing to "real" magic that a child can experience!

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
----- Sonny Narvaez
Alan Munro
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In a stage act, the audience really doesn't have much opportunity to bust you on moves. You have the opportunity to disprove the method, seconds later. That advantage can be a double edged sword, because far too many manipulators delude themselves - routines tend to have parts that fool no one. I've lost track of how many award-winners have acts that leave me cold. I found myself rolling my eyes, many times, during the stage shows at The Magic Get-Together.
jimhlou
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6 year olds are harder to fool than adults! Their little minds are very logical until we (as adults) condition them to think like us.

During my floating rose routine, the little ones will often shout out "it's on a string". The adults poo-poo them - they don't have a clue.

Jim
Dr_J_Ayala
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Quote:
On 2011-09-04 17:17, Alan Munro wrote:
In a stage act, the audience really doesn't have much opportunity to bust you on moves. You have the opportunity to disprove the method, seconds later. That advantage can be a double edged sword, because far too many manipulators delude themselves - routines tend to have parts that fool no one. I've lost track of how many award-winners have acts that leave me cold. I found myself rolling my eyes, many times, during the stage shows at The Magic Get-Together.


I concur. I have seen it at many big conventions as well, like the Blackpool convention, Colombus MagiFest, etc. It really makes you wonder what they are thinking.
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