The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » Do we have judicial problems? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Woland
View Profile
Special user
680 Posts

Profile of Woland
Conrad Black thinks so. Of course, he does have a personal beef . . .

Quote:
The larger point is that the entire American justice system is crumbling. The country has nearly 48 million people with a criminal record; it has half the lawyers and a quarter of the incarcerated people in the world, and annual legal costs almost as large as the GDP of India. Congress is stuffed with second-rate lawyers who pass grandstanding laws that clutter the courts with what other serious jurisdictions would consider frivolous and vexatious litigation, and the benches are infested with unregenerate ex-prosecutors.

The executive is led about in these matters by an out-of-control prosecutocracy that is an unaccountable state within a state. I had hoped that when the prosecutors wrongly took down the vice president’s chief of staff and then destroyed the career of a long-serving senator (Ted Stevens) on the basis of what was soon admitted to be sleazy evidentiary practices, and was reversed, the Congress, the judiciary, and even the more sensible elements of the administration would apply some checks and balances. It hasn’t happened; the prosecutors win over 90 percent of their cases, almost 90 percent of the time by negotiation, because of the fascistic permutation of the plea bargain into the extortion or subornation of incriminating perjury, and the threat of a much heavier sentence if the constitutionally guaranteed right to a trial is exercised.

All legally informed persons in this country, including Shannen Coffin and the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court, know all this. If a brilliant, righteous, and fearless justice like Antonin Scalia is going to rail against co-educational college dormitories while lawless prosecutors are running amok throughout the land, it is indeed, time to pray, and not just for the coeds, the unborn, and the denizens of death row.

The antics of spear-carrying cheerleaders of the foundering system, like Shannen Coffin, will count for little in this reckoning. But the Supreme Court is constantly petitioned to restore the Bill of Rights, which is almost the entire basis of the (now rather ragged) claim of America to be the land of the free. The Supreme Court is the guardian, interpreter, and ultimate imposing authority of the Constitution. The whole country has a right to know where the Court has been while the Bill of Rights has been put to the shredder. The future of the United States as a center of the rule of law depends on its restoration.
Al Angello
View Profile
Eternal Order
Collegeville, Pa. USA
11047 Posts

Profile of Al Angello
There is no legal backlog in the Saudi criminal system, because they execute criminals.

If we legalized victim less crimes the prisons population would rapidly shrink, and the legal backlog would disappear. We are shooting ourselves in the foot repeatedly.
Al Angello The Comic Juggler/Magician
http://www.juggleral.com
http://home.comcast.net/~juggleral/
"Footprints on your ceiling are almost gone"
critter
View Profile
Inner circle
Spokane, WA
2551 Posts

Profile of critter
Which comedian said that you can't say "judicial system" without sounding drunk?
"The fool is one who doesn't know what you have just found out."
~Will Rogers
rockwall
View Profile
Special user
763 Posts

Profile of rockwall
I don't know who it was but I'll bet he sounded drunk at the time!
Magnus Eisengrim
View Profile
Inner circle
Sulla placed heads on
1064 Posts

Profile of Magnus Eisengrim
Quote:
On 2011-10-20 07:27, Woland wrote:
Conrad Black thinks so. Of course, he does have a personal beef . . .

Quote:
The larger point is that the entire American justice system is crumbling. The country has nearly 48 million people with a criminal record; it has half the lawyers and a quarter of the incarcerated people in the world, and annual legal costs almost as large as the GDP of India. Congress is stuffed with second-rate lawyers who pass grandstanding laws that clutter the courts with what other serious jurisdictions would consider frivolous and vexatious litigation, and the benches are infested with unregenerate ex-prosecutors.

The executive is led about in these matters by an out-of-control prosecutocracy that is an unaccountable state within a state. I had hoped that when the prosecutors wrongly took down the vice president’s chief of staff and then destroyed the career of a long-serving senator (Ted Stevens) on the basis of what was soon admitted to be sleazy evidentiary practices, and was reversed, the Congress, the judiciary, and even the more sensible elements of the administration would apply some checks and balances. It hasn’t happened; the prosecutors win over 90 percent of their cases, almost 90 percent of the time by negotiation, because of the fascistic permutation of the plea bargain into the extortion or subornation of incriminating perjury, and the threat of a much heavier sentence if the constitutionally guaranteed right to a trial is exercised.

All legally informed persons in this country, including Shannen Coffin and the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court, know all this. If a brilliant, righteous, and fearless justice like Antonin Scalia is going to rail against co-educational college dormitories while lawless prosecutors are running amok throughout the land, it is indeed, time to pray, and not just for the coeds, the unborn, and the denizens of death row.

The antics of spear-carrying cheerleaders of the foundering system, like Shannen Coffin, will count for little in this reckoning. But the Supreme Court is constantly petitioned to restore the Bill of Rights, which is almost the entire basis of the (now rather ragged) claim of America to be the land of the free. The Supreme Court is the guardian, interpreter, and ultimate imposing authority of the Constitution. The whole country has a right to know where the Court has been while the Bill of Rights has been put to the shredder. The future of the United States as a center of the rule of law depends on its restoration.



Did he write that from his prison cell?
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
Woland
View Profile
Special user
680 Posts

Profile of Woland
Not sure if he is back behind bars yet. But at least if the other thread is to be believed, white collar convicts don't have it that bad.
Kevin Ridgeway
View Profile
V.I.P.
Indianapolis, IN & Phoenix, AZ
1830 Posts

Profile of Kevin Ridgeway
Quote:
On 2011-10-20 10:20, critter wrote:
Which comedian said that you can't say "judicial system" without sounding drunk?


It was Dana Carvey. Hilarious routine about the O.J. trial.
Living Illusions
Ridgeway & Johnson Entertainment Inc

Kevin Ridgeway &
Kristen Johnson aka Lady Houdini
The World's Premier Female Escape Artist

www.LadyHoudini.com

www.livingillusions.com
tommy
View Profile
Eternal Order
Devil’s Island
16249 Posts

Profile of tommy
Not many will be going to prison soon as there will be soon nothing left to steal.
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » Do we have judicial problems? (0 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2021 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.21 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL