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isaacfawlkes
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The Blues Brother. A social satire delving into the Judeo-Christian interrelationship of the prision system and the Catholic Church. Also had a really cool car chase and Johnathon Pendragon as a stunt double.
Magnus Eisengrim
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Quote:
On 2011-10-24 14:21, LobowolfXXX wrote:
Quote:
On 2011-10-24 14:15, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
Great excerpt, and yes, it is everything at the end of the book. If you ask me name my favourite novel, about 60% of the time, I'll say Heart of Darkness.

John


What about the other 40%?

My favorite movie varies from time to time, but my favorite novel is very reliably John Irving's "A Prayer for Owen Meany."


I was hoping you'd ask. Lolita.

And I haven't read Owen Meany. I'll get on that right away.

John
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
stoneunhinged
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Quote:
On 2011-10-24 14:21, LobowolfXXX wrote:
...but my favorite novel is very reliably John Irving's "A Prayer for Owen Meany."


Interesting choice. It is (IMHO), by far Irving's most interesting book, and a whopping good read. My second Irving choice would be "The Water-Method Man".

My favorite novel is Umberto Eco's "Foucault's Pendulum". But no one ought to read anything into that choice. I simply loved the book.
critter
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So it's just me for Hard Target?
"The fool is one who doesn't know what you have just found out."
~Will Rogers
Magnus Eisengrim
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[quote]On 2011-10-24 14:59, stoneunhinged wrote:
Quote:
On 2011-10-24 14:21, LobowolfXXX wrote:
My favorite novel is Umberto Eco's "Foucault's Pendulum". But no one ought to read anything into that choice. I simply loved the book.


Too late. It's a great book, and, yeah, I think can see some of your attraction to it.

John
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
James FX
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Invasion of the Body Snatchers. Unexpectedly deep for me, at least to my young mind back then.
LobowolfXXX
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Quote:
On 2011-10-24 15:00, critter wrote:
So it's just me for Hard Target?


I've only seen the Broadway musical.
"Torture doesn't work" lol
Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

"...as we reason and love, we are able to hope. And hope enables us to resist those things that would enslave us."
LobowolfXXX
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Quote:
On 2011-10-24 14:57, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:


And I haven't read Owen Meany. I'll get on that right away.

John


Please do...I'd be very interested to hear your take.
"Torture doesn't work" lol
Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

"...as we reason and love, we are able to hope. And hope enables us to resist those things that would enslave us."
stoneunhinged
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On 2011-10-24 15:04, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:

Too late. It's a great book, and, yeah, I think can see some of your attraction to it.

John


As long as were on the book thing, my favorite "book"--by FAR--is "A River Runs Through It." All three stories are wonderful, the writing is delicious, the trip to a rough, manly America with lumberjacks and stuff like that that is no more--you know, back when it was like Canada...what more can one want for an evening's fireside read? And there's even a card sharp in the third story! Not sure if I would call it deep, but I would call it profound and deeply touching. And the truth is, I have been brought to tears by the title story many, many times.

I saw the movie of the title story once. *yawn*, for the most part. The story with the card sharp was made into some kind of TV movie with Ricky Jay playing the cook, but I've only seen video clips of Ricky shuffling, so I have no idea how the movie itself played out.

Since I also love "Young Men and Fire", I can say without hesitation of any kind that my favorite writer of all time is Norman Maclean.
ClintonMagus
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Mr. Bean...
Things are more like they are today than they've ever been before...
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Woland
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I would be hard pressed to name a favorite novel, although I have probably read TLoTR more times than most other books on my shelf. 100 Years of Solitude is also a wonderful book to read and read again. At the moment, though, having just last week completed my first reading of Chandler's translation of Vasily Grossman's "LIFE AND FATE," I'd have to put it very high on my list. Definitely worthy of the company of Pasternak and Shalamov.
motown
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"The Reader"
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Magnus Eisengrim
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Quote:
On 2011-10-24 16:31, Woland wrote:
I would be hard pressed to name a favorite novel, although I have probably read TLoTR more times than most other books on my shelf. 100 Years of Solitude is also a wonderful book to read and read again. At the moment, though, having just last week completed my first reading of Chandler's translation of Vasily Grossman's "LIFE AND FATE," I'd have to put it very high on my list. Definitely worthy of the company of Pasternak and Shalamov.


You're right, Woland. We DO have a lot in common.

John
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
Woland
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Thank you, Magnus. We should have more discussions of eternal matters here, rather than ephemeral.
panlives
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Quote:
On 2011-10-24 16:16, stoneunhinged wrote:
Quote:
On 2011-10-24 15:04, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:

Too late. It's a great book, and, yeah, I think can see some of your attraction to it.

John


As long as were on the book thing, my favorite "book"--by FAR--is "A River Runs Through It." All three stories are wonderful, the writing is delicious, the trip to a rough, manly America with lumberjacks and stuff like that that is no more--you know, back when it was like Canada...what more can one want for an evening's fireside read? And there's even a card sharp in the third story! Not sure if I would call it deep, but I would call it profound and deeply touching. And the truth is, I have been brought to tears by the title story many, many times.

I saw the movie of the title story once. *yawn*, for the most part. The story with the card sharp was made into some kind of TV movie with Ricky Jay playing the cook, but I've only seen video clips of Ricky shuffling, so I have no idea how the movie itself played out.

Since I also love "Young Men and Fire", I can say without hesitation of any kind that my favorite writer of all time is Norman Maclean.


"I am haunted by waters."
"Is there any point to which you would wish to draw my attention?"
"To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time."
"The dog did nothing in the night-time."
"That was the curious incident," remarked Sherlock Holmes.
Steve_Mollett
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Altered States
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Author of: GARROTE ESCAPES
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Woland
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Perhaps we should distinguish between the deepest movie (or book), my favorite movie, and the greatest movie (or book).
landmark
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All of the movie choices, including my own, have been very mainstream. There's a whole world of avant-garde film that we haven't touched (and that I am largely unfamilar with, despite my membership to MOMA Smile ).

Greatest book: Don Quixote. Favorite novelist: Philip Roth. Greatest Literary achievement of any kind: Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies, better known as the First Folio.
Magnus Eisengrim
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Would you call Au Hasard Balthazar mainstream, Landmark?
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
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