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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The Gambling Spot » » Modern Card Counting by Cris Statz (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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M for Magic
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Modern Card Counting by Cris Statz
Anyone here read this or know about it? I have a few of CC related books both old and new and am interested in this but hesitant.
It is only available as a Kindle for $27.95 and I'm not about to part with that much if it is rubbish.
If anyone has this and/or has read other CC related books, how does it compare?
Is this book worth the money or is my cash better spent on a better source.
Thanks.
J
silverking
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With this line in the advertising blurb, you'd be wise to consider a different author:

This book is not a purchase, it is an investment. Following the methods in this book will mathematically guarantee the professional counter hundreds of thousands or even millions of dollars in less than a year.

Try Stanford Wong or Arnold Snyder for a more realistic take on counting.
Dannydoyle
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It totally depends on why you want to learn. If you are looking to win millions, well be ready to risk millions. The swings are HUGE and all within the expected variation.

Wong has some of the definitive work as does the Snyder.

If you want to learn about why systems work there is an under rated book by Sklansky called Skylansky Talks Blackjack. It explains pretty well why each hand in the basic strategy chart is played the way it is. The concept of not necessarily winning more but losing less. He goes through every possible hand and why you play it the way you do. It is not a system, but it is quite a good basic education and explaiins Blackjack pretty well indepth. http://www.amazon.com/Sklansky-Talks-Bla......ee_p_t_1

Again it is not about counting per se, but rather about the math behind the strategy.
Danny Doyle
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<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
Dannydoyle
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If you are looking for more there is a book he also wrote called "Getting the Best of It". Not bad at all.

Also "How to Make $100,000 a Year Gambling For a Living". It is a pretty realistic look at the amount of money you need to put into play in order to actually make money. It tells you which games are beatable and which are money pits. All were written in the late 1990's but are pretty good and cheap.
Danny Doyle
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<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
splice
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Looking at the table of contents, there doesn't seem to be anything new or innovative. Everything's been covered by better authors, and considering this is a kindle-only offering at a ridiculous price, I would wager this is just another one of those "take content from everywhere, aggregate it, publish it, profit" books. Considering also that search results show a lot of SEO sites and essentially no mention of the book on any blackjack discussion site, and I think you're perfectly safe to ignore this one completely and just go to the classics.
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I started playing the count in Nevada in 1962 and was one of the original counters. Single decks play, great rules, dealt down to the last 2 to 3 cards or through the entire deck with a reshuffle with some of the cards still left to be played on the layout (known as “end play). Played for about ten years starting at a time when most on the inside knew almost nothing about counting, and many believed the game could not be beat with the count. I played for many years with no or very little heat except for “winning” heat. Had to avoid bust-out dealers from time to time, but it was THE TIME for counting. Played mostly heads-up with no more than two players maximum in the game and moved from joint to joint.

Because the conditions I played under were so favorable, I never had a losing segment of more than 3 hours before I got out and booked a winner. The fluctuations in capital were relatively small, the favorable situations could be very strong and the overall edge was enough to satisfy the most avaricious.

After I got out of counting (because too many newbie square johns where learning to count and bringing “sucker” heat on the game), I wrote in the 1970s, under the pen name of Richard Alan Canfield, a book entitled, (somewhat pretentiously), "Blackjack Your Way to Riches," which at that time had cutting edge material on counting and included the experiences of my team members and myself during the “golden years” of counting. I also helped Specks Parsons (known as Lawrence Revere), write the book, "Playing Blackjack as a Business" prior to that. Julian Braun of IBM did all the Blackjack simulations and we had information about the game that is still relatively unknow today.

Now, 50 years after card counting was published, I look at current playing conditions and the fact that EVERYONE knows about card counting, with people in surveillance also counting when they track your play, I can only say to newbie counters, “Lots of Luck,” because you are going to need it.

My suggestion would be to write a book about counting like the others do who can’t beat the game (or make enough to make it worthwhile) under current playing conditions. Anyone who says you can make millions playing the count under today’s conditions is a charlatan looking to sell a dubious product.

Hope this is somewhat helpful.
silverking
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Great post Cagliostro!

To the OP, most of what you might want to know in order to get started towards understanding counting is freely available on the Internet..........something you may want to take advantage of.
mahucharn
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Quote:
On 2011-12-28 15:44, silverking wrote:
Great post Cagliostro!

To the OP, most of what you might want to know in order to get started towards understanding counting is freely available on the Internet..........something you may want to take advantage of.


I believe Arnold McDonald has some resource on his website that was setup like a card game, but displayed the current count in one corner.
M for Magic
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Wow!
Thanks for the responses guys.
Great advice.
I am in the category of just wanting to lose less.
I have no allusions of making millions. Just a few hundred here and there.
The Statz book claimed a lot and and cost a lot. I'm glad I went with my guy and posted.
Thanks again.
AMcD
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Quote:
I believe Arnold McDonald has some resource on his website that was setup like a card game, but displayed the current count in one corner.


Here -> http://www.arnoldmcdonald.org/code/main.php?p=6600000

I'm currently adding new counting systems.
M for Magic
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Very nice Arnold!
Which count is your favorite?

PS:
I just purchased and downloaded Skylansky Talks Blackjack.
$9.99 on Google books! Fantastic book. Thanks for the recco!
AMcD
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Thanks.

I'd say I have a soft spot for the KO count. But I'm far for being a BlackJack pro!
JasonEngland
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Quote:
On 2011-12-28 15:01, Cagliostro wrote:
under the pen name of Richard Alan Canfield,


I've always enjoyed that book and wondered why you choose that particular pen name. I know who the real Canfield was, but did his story resonate with you in some way? Just curious.

By the way, your own book lists "your" middle name as Albert, not Alan. Just FYI.

Jason
Eternal damnation awaits anyone who questions God's unconditional love. --Bill Hicks
Cagliostro
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Quote:
On 2012-01-06 22:06, JasonEngland wrote:
Quote:
On 2011-12-28 15:01, Cagliostro wrote:
under the pen name of Richard Alan Canfield,


I've always enjoyed that book and wondered why you choose that particular pen name. I know who the real Canfield was, but did his story resonate with you in some way? Just curious.

By the way, your own book lists "your" middle name as Albert, not Alan. Just FYI.

Jason

Glad you enjoyed the book, Jason. By the way, the correct name is Richard Albert Canfield. Just a typo in my post.

Picked the name for no particular reason other than I thought it was catchy. R.A. Canfield was a well-known gambling operator in Providence R.I. in the early 1900s and operated a famous gambling establishment in New York City for many years, (where I am from), a solitaire games was named after him and his name was well known and related to gambling. He was an art collector which also added a little “sophistication” to the name.

It was a long time ago when I wrote that book, Jason. I was still in my early thirties, just winding down a very successful card counting career, thought and felt I was King Kong, and went on to “other” ventures.
Cagliostro
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Duplicate post. Can't delete.
JasonEngland
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Cool.

I own Canfield: The True Story of the Greatest Gambler by Alexander Gardiner. My stated first edition was published in Garden City, NY in 1930 (although copyright dates also say 1928 and 1929 in my copy - perhaps some of it originally appeared in magazine articles before the book?). A decent read and you're right, Canfield was an interesting guy.

Good blackjack trivia information. Thanks for sharing.

Jason
Eternal damnation awaits anyone who questions God's unconditional love. --Bill Hicks
Tony45
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Cagliostro, I have your book also and I think its a great piece on the single deck game. I had mentioned to you before about Humbles book, Blackjack Gold and how this guy had to be the most paranoid guy to ever play 21. According to him, almost every dealer in the state of Nevada was a mechanic and the rougher looking ones were also members of organized crime, lol.
In your experience, how many guys tried to make a move on you on the 21 tables ? And what would you say was the worst incident ?
I know you don't like to say too much, but I would bet dollars to doughnuts that if you wrote a book about your experiences in the 60,s it would probably be a work of art and probably funny as hell also.
luvisi
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Quote:
On 2011-12-28 15:01, Cagliostro wrote:
After I got out of counting (because too many newbie square johns where learning to count and bringing “sucker” heat on the game), I wrote in the 1970s, under the pen name of Richard Alan Canfield, a book entitled, (somewhat pretentiously), "Blackjack Your Way to Riches," which at that time had cutting edge material on counting and included the experiences of my team members and myself during the “golden years” of counting.


That was my first book on Blackjack! I bought it in my early teens, and had dreams of mastering card counting by the time I was old enough to gamble. I never did, but I can still remember the excitement I felt reading your book. I haven't cracked it open in years, but I can see it on my shelf from where I'm sitting... Maybe I'll go open it again now!

Andru
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This was the first book I ever read on the subject. It is amazing. The second one was "Playing Blackjack as a Business" by Lawerence Revere. (Talk about pretentious!)

Your book hooked me for one reason and it happend RIGHT IN THE PREFAC! I would like to quote it because it is simply the most accurate statement ever made about Blackjack and what it takes to win consistantly.

"Aside from the audacious pun in the title of the book, there is an incredible assumption: that it is not only possible to win consistantly playing Blackjack, but that it is possible to get rich at the game, as well.

"That's all true, IF THE READER IS ABLE TO COMPLETELY UNDERSTAND AND FOLLOW THE PROCEDURES AND TECHNIQUES OUTLINED".

Man that last sentence really hit home for me. That means it is not easy, it means it requires study and practice and once you are good to be great it is 10X the amount of practice and don't think it happens overnight. Thank you for that insight.
Danny Doyle
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<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
Cagliostro
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Thanks guys for the nice comments about Blackjack Your Way to Riches. I'm glad that a few of you got a small measure of benefit from it and I was not aware there were a number of members on this board that read the book. It was a long time ago and we had a very professional team back them, all had hustler grift sense mentalities and we mixed it up so much the floor and the sky never had a clue as to what was happening.

Tony, as far a running into bust-out dealers, at that time one would most likely encounter them on the Graveyard shift in Vegas and just about any time of the day or night in Reno and Tahoe. Some of the best BO dealers were woman - a few of who had very big balls. They would smile sweetly and pull a No. 2. One absolutely knockout chick I almost fell in love with (because she had incredible moves – figure that one out guys), but that is for another day.

We could usually notice if someone might be capable before we sat down by their movements and we would simply avoid those dealers. However, sometimes you would not know until you were playing on the game. In that case, if a dealer happened to move during the hand and we lost the hand we would simply pat the table “push,” and get up and leave. We never had a problem with the dealer when we did that. Suffice it to say, if anyone was working the game, it was we and not the dealer.

At that time, busting out was really coming to an end except in very small out of the way spots. But you could encounter it at any time.

I was fooled one time in Harvey’s - Lake Tahoe for about 20 minutes by an elderly woman BJ dealer. The lady looked like my grandmother. I was playing heads-up single deck against this “sweet old lady” who was dealing down to the last 5 or 6 cards. She was a very clean dealer, dealt at a moderate pace, no number 2s, no deck flops, no kill slugs, no short pays and no red flags in the way she handled and dealt the cards. I thought to myself, “How sweet it is – BJ Heaven on Earth.”

I was 22 years old and playing Thorp’s Ten Count. However, I noticed I was getting a lot of favorable situations, more than I normally should and although I was not losing any money to the play, I was not making any either. Then I noticed when the dealer went to shuffle the deck there were only three cards remaining and there should have been six. (With the Ten Count you would know this.) I thought, “Did I lose the count? Is that why I am not making any money on this game?” Next hand the same thing happened – two cards left and there should have been five. I knew the deck could not be short because I was at the table when a new deck was put in.

Next hand when the dealer is scooping up the cards her left hand appeared to be turned a little too much. “Was that a bubble peek,” I said to myself. Next hand she turns her hand a little too much on the pickup and I know, “YUP. That’s a bubble peek.”

What this sweet old lady was doing was peeking at the top card only once on the final pick-up at the end of the hand. If it was a ten or Ace, she would skillfully drop in on top of the discards in her right hand and then bury the cards under the deck. (There were no discard trays in those days. The discards were put face up under the deck.) On the first card of a new hand, if I were to receive a ten or Ace, she would kill it on me and give me the next card. If my first card were to be a small card, she would politely deal it to me. In additiion, the deck would appear to be more favorable than it actually was, or favorable when it was unfavorable. I could stay even with her and maybe beat her in the end, but there were much easier games to beat.

I could not believe my eyes. I smiled at this sweet lady, thanked her for a very pleasant game, gave her a small toke and then went on to another game. I did not rap to her that I picked up on what she was doing. Only a chump or half-smart would do that. Play the “IG” and you last a lot longer.

The good old days were not only good, they were GREAT.
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