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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The spooky, the mysterious...the bizarre! » » The Cottingley Fairies... (5 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Hawkcormyr
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I know everyone might not like it, but I find that the "Torchwood" TV series episode about the faeries contain an interesting point of view and some good story plots.
horganpaul
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Have a look at fairy forts in Ireland, literally dozens of stories.
Including some very adaptable ones about fairies stealing/swapping human babies for fairy babies......
Voodini
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My favourite novel of all time is Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell. It's a huge book (700 pages from memory) but is a brilliant read for anyone with an interest in magic, the esoteric, the 1800's, and faerie lore. One of the main tenets of the story is that there are literally hundred of "faerie roads" dotted around Britain that lead to Faerie. Over the centuries though these roads have become lost and overgrown. However sometimes particularly powerful and brave magicians come along who try to re-establish communication with the faeries, and learn their powerful magic.

You can pick the book up ridiculously cheaply second hand on Amazon.
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Quote:
On 2012-02-01 09:49, Voodini wrote:
My favourite novel of all time is Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell. It's a huge book (700 pages from memory) but is a brilliant read for anyone with an interest in magic, the esoteric, the 1800's, and faerie lore. One of the main tenets of the story is that there are literally hundred of "faerie roads" dotted around Britain that lead to Faerie. Over the centuries though these roads have become lost and overgrown. However sometimes particularly powerful and brave magicians come along who try to re-establish communication with the faeries, and learn their powerful magic.

You can pick the book up ridiculously cheaply second hand on Amazon.


Just purchased this, thanks Voodini !

~*~
13
Van Helmont
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On 2012-02-01 09:49, Voodini wrote:
My favourite novel of all time is Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell.
You can pick the book up ridiculously cheaply second hand on Amazon.


I couldn't agree more. The book is exquisitely written, very funny, eerie at times, and it provides us with a complete setup of possible routines.
I actually made a Hauntique based on this story two years ago: the golden George III, 1799 coins you see in the picture above refer to an event from the book.

There are several hints to Belgium, one chapter actually taking place here !
1. Waterloo is literaly in my back yard (and also the spot where you can find the Curator on early Sunday mornings, scavaging...).
2. Witloof: “The grand success of the British magicians Mr. Norrell and Mr. Strange naturally excited the keenest envy in the breast of the Corsican Tyrant and he quickly determined to find a magician of his own. Alas, a thorough search throughout his empire produced only one, Witloof. Witloof claimed to possess a magic wardrobe into which, like the Delphic priestess with her fumey cave, he would on occasion enter and shortly afterwards return with the answer to any query that was put to him. This wardrobe was conveyed carefully to Versailles and there Witloof undertook to use it to answer every question the Emperor proposed. The Emperor made three enquiries, and watched with the liveliest interest as Witloof thrice entered the wardrobe and thrice returned with answers that gratified the imperial wish in every particular. Now, whether it was this which excited his suspicions, or the hideous noises and dreadful lights which issued from the wardrobe whenever Witloof went into it, we cannot be sure: but whatever Buonaparte was, he was no fool, and so after a second or two of thought he pulled open the door of the wardrobe and discovered inside it a goose (for the noises) and a dwarf (to prod the goose and to make the strange fiery lights by igniting saltpetre). The goose was soon eaten, and Witloof and the dwarf promptly vanished - but not, it is to be feared, by magical means.”
The word 'witloof' (phonetic pronounciation = WITLOAF) translates as 'white leaf" and in Belgium it is a name given to a species of endive – our national pride!

So yes, this book is a MUST READ for all that dwell here!
The Epiphany Before Christmas: this day (12/23/13) I leave the Café for good!
Van Helmont
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And here's the intro to my story.

Brussels, 10th June 1865

Judging from the painful sobbing coming from outside, Charles-François De Smaele was going to have a busy day, again. Though the city of Brussels was littered with clairvoyants, miracle doctors and other doubtful charlatans, he was the only respected member of the one-man guild of tooth pullers. From the middle ages through the early 19th century, tooth pulling was a performance art. Barber-surgeons cut hair, set bones, let blood, and pulled teeth. Toothache could be treated with leeches, blistering, cupping, and laxatives, as well as with prescriptions of lizard liver, green frogs, and a urine gargle. Opium mixtures were popular painkillers. When refined sugar became widely available in the 17th century, dental caries became common. For more desperate sufferers, itinerant tooth pullers set up shop in marketplaces and at fairs. The “dentist” and his assistants attracted a crowd by telling stories, singing and dancing, performing tricks, or juggling. The tooth puller's assistant was usually dressed as a clown or a harlequin, with a pointed hat on which was inscribed the insignia of Saint Apollonia, the patron saint of toothache sufferers. The tooth extraction was an essential part of the entertainment.

His life had been a waxing and waning of good fortune and bad luck. He had been a promising medical student, even obtaining his diploma, but his unorthodox belief in Mesmerism earned him professional scorn, academic contempt and social degradation which led him to suffer the indignity of having to earn a living as a mere tooth puller, that butcher amongst jawbreakers.
And yet… he had a flawless reputation, he even managed to get introduced into the more fashionable middle classes because, unlike his illustrious colleagues, he had a gift: he was painless. No matter how deep the whimsical roots of a molar would run, how painfully decayed the root of an upper wisdom tooth seemed to spread to the sinews of the eyes; people would invariably leave his practice without a hint of pain, even seeming to have forgotten why they came to see him in the first place.
Was it the way of talking to his patients, which was soft, mysterious and habitually friendly; or the unseen manner of relaxing his patients, asking them to look at a flame; or maybe the odd medicine he had them rinse their mouths with, customarily served in an old earthenware jar; or even his supple use of the tortural tooth claw which, in his hands, seemingly caressed their teeth?
Whatever it was, Charles-François De Smaele was basically the finest and unsurpassed dentist of the capital.
Although the future seemed to smile brightly, something was wrong with him. Horribly wrong. And it all had to do with his past and with the woman who, though he only met her the time of one night, changed the course of his life forever.
The Epiphany Before Christmas: this day (12/23/13) I leave the Café for good!
Ms. Merizing
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On 2012-01-31 12:15, Ms. Merizing wrote:
A terrific film concerning the fairies is Fairy Tale: A True Story.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0119095/


Here's a link to the trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_1q1YBCjwI
Pleased to continue finding that all the world's a stage.
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To present fairies and pixies to a modern audience, you have to be the biggest disbeliever in the world, insisting that there are no such things, it's all humbug, and so on. Meanwhile your audience is seeing fairies everywhere that you just refuse to see or believe in and you are in the position of having them try to convince YOU that they are real and right in front of you. It's a form of the kid show performer's favorite bit of "look don't see" with some Ebeneezer Scrooge attitude thrown in.
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Voodini
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Great stuff VH. I am literally weighed down with wonderful books at the moment, but I must somehow find time to re-read Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell. Coincidence it may or may not be, but the time when I first read this book coincided with a great upturn in my fortunes. Now whenever I see a crow or raven, I nod my head and thank John Uskglass for my continued good fortune. I live in the north of England so it comes naturally. Smile
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Voodini
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On 2012-02-01 12:38, Spellbinder wrote:
To present fairies and pixies to a modern audience, you have to be the biggest disbeliever in the world, insisting that there are no such things, it's all humbug, and so on. Meanwhile your audience is seeing fairies everywhere that you just refuse to see or believe in and you are in the position of having them try to convince YOU that they are real and right in front of you. It's a form of the kid show performer's favorite bit of "look don't see" with some Ebeneezer Scrooge attitude thrown in.

I don't *entirely* agree. It might be a cultural thing. In Britain (and to an even larger extent in Ireland) there still persists in rural areas a deep seated belief in faeries and the "little folk". I know from my own experience (I live in a rural area having moved out of a large city) of farmers that won't plow a field if there's a fairy ring (a circle of mushrooms) in it. And I was seriously admonished by my ex-mother-in-law for walking through such a fairy ring while on a countryside walk.

Bear in mind these aren't the fairies of Disney. These are earth spirits more likely to slit your throat with a silver blade or steal away your children than winkle their nose and give your 3 wishes. The belief in "changelings" was rife in rural Britain right up to the early-to-mid 20th Century, and I bet if you travel to some villages you will find the old beliefs still persisting.

I've run ghost hunts in some villages on the edge of the Derbyshire moors where the cottages have straw crucifixes affixed to the windows, bags of silver coins left out on the doorstep, and flower garlands decorating the wells that lead to underground caves. What's that all about? It's freaky stuff. More Wicker Man than Tinker Bell & Friends. Smile
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Van Helmont
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Bear in mind these aren't the fairies of Disney. These are earth spirits more likely to slit your throat with a silver blade or steal away your children than winkle their nose and give your 3 wishes.


Same thing here. With the advent of christianism, in folktales the references to fairies, elves or gnomes morphed into one character, the devil. But little people didn't totally vanish.

This link refers to a TV show very popular in the 60s. And it's about an alverman, an elfman
http://www.youtube.com/watch?hl=en&v=kp-866zY1b0&gl=US
The Epiphany Before Christmas: this day (12/23/13) I leave the Café for good!
Van Helmont
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Quote:
Bear in mind these aren't the fairies of Disney. These are earth spirits more likely to slit your throat with a silver blade or steal away your children than winkle their nose and give your 3 wishes.


Same thing here. With the advent of christianism, in folktales the references to fairies, elves or gnomes morphed into one character, the devil. But little people didn't totally vanish.

This link refers to a TV show very popular in the 60s. And it's about an alverman, an elfman
http://www.youtube.com/watch?hl=en&v=kp-866zY1b0&gl=US
The Epiphany Before Christmas: this day (12/23/13) I leave the Café for good!
Voodini
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Aw, now I want to see the rest of the show! Smile
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Van Helmont
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On 2012-02-01 12:42, Voodini wrote:
I live in the north of England so it comes naturally. Smile


It's been a while since I was up north - I somehow always get stuck between London (where I lived, studied and which is basically my second hometown), Brighton (where some of my mates live) and Driffield (home of that excellent guitarplayer Mike Simpson).
How north of England is yours?
The Epiphany Before Christmas: this day (12/23/13) I leave the Café for good!
Voodini
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On 2012-02-01 14:36, Van Helmont wrote:

How north of England is yours?

Between Sheffield and Manchester, close to Glossop on the Dark Moors! Smile
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KOTAH
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One of the more magical non magic books inmy library is, " The doyle Diary " byMichael Baker"


Within its pages are reproductions of all of the drawings created by Charles Altamont Doyle.

Charles was the father of Arthur Conan Doyle. Charles assembled his works in something he refered to as 'Charles altamont doyle, his buke -8 March 1889. It is filled with seventy some pages of wonderous imagined creatures and sprites within a troubled mind

If you can find a copy, do not hesitate to purchase same. No regrets

Kotah
Van Helmont
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Between Sheffield and Manchester, close to Glossop on the Dark Moors! Smile


Ah, the Midlands. Would that be Cheshire or Staffordshire (I never seem to make them out)?

And thank you KOTAH: I'll look this one up for my backstory.
The Epiphany Before Christmas: this day (12/23/13) I leave the Café for good!
WayneCapps
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Quote:
On 2012-02-01 12:55, Voodini wrote:
Quote:
On 2012-02-01 12:38, Spellbinder wrote:
To present fairies and pixies to a modern audience, you have to be the biggest disbeliever in the world, insisting that there are no such things, it's all humbug, and so on. Meanwhile your audience is seeing fairies everywhere that you just refuse to see or believe in and you are in the position of having them try to convince YOU that they are real and right in front of you. It's a form of the kid show performer's favorite bit of "look don't see" with some Ebeneezer Scrooge attitude thrown in.

I don't *entirely* agree. It might be a cultural thing. In Britain (and to an even larger extent in Ireland) there still persists in rural areas a deep seated belief in faeries and the "little folk". I know from my own experience (I live in a rural area having moved out of a large city) of farmers that won't plow a field if there's a fairy ring (a circle of mushrooms) in it. And I was seriously admonished by my ex-mother-in-law for walking through such a fairy ring while on a countryside walk.

Bear in mind these aren't the fairies of Disney. These are earth spirits more likely to slit your throat with a silver blade or steal away your children than winkle their nose and give your 3 wishes. The belief in "changelings" was rife in rural Britain right up to the early-to-mid 20th Century, and I bet if you travel to some villages you will find the old beliefs still persisting.

I've run ghost hunts in some villages on the edge of the Derbyshire moors where the cottages have straw crucifixes affixed to the windows, bags of silver coins left out on the doorstep, and flower garlands decorating the wells that lead to underground caves. What's that all about? It's freaky stuff. More Wicker Man than Tinker Bell & Friends. Smile


I agree Paul, it is a cultural thing. People in the U.S. see fairies as a thing of Disney, not a folk creature that could possibly be real. Bigfoot is sort of like that here in the US. You have old folklore surrounding the legend and people that will swear that it is real. We have lots of other fantasy creatures here but fairies seem to be something that does not get a lot of stock here in the states.
Tony Iacoviello
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I fon't know about that.
Look at the TV schedule, Grimm, Once Upon a Time, Lost Girl, there seems to be an interest.
Voodini
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Quote:
On 2012-02-01 14:52, Van Helmont wrote:


Ah, the Midlands. Would that be Cheshire or Staffordshire (I never seem to make them out)?



I'm actually officially in Yorkshire, although the Derbyshire boundary is about 200 yards away, and Lancashire about two miles away.

Don't let people in Sheffield or Manchester hear you referring to them as "the Midlands"! Smile

As an aside, wasn't the kingdom of John Uskglass, faerie king of the north, Newcastle down to Derby?
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