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S2000magician
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First, a bit of background.

I've recently started lessons in earnest to learn jumping on horseback. The lessons start with learning to ride in what's called "two-point": standing in the stirrups and not sitting in the saddle. My instructor did say, however, that it's OK to put my hands on the horse's neck and put a little weight - say, 10 lbs. or so - on my hands to steady myself.

Being a mathematician, I look at almost everything as analogy, and this morning I thought about offensive players in football getting in a three-point stance. I can recall vividly the coach walking past players to inspect their stance; when he suspected that they had too much weight on their hand, he'd kick their hand away and watch as they (usually) fell face-first to the ground. (I generally made sure that I wasn't the guinea pig for any of the coaching sessions; I can also recall that when he came by and kicked my hand away, I remained upright, having had the opportunity to watch several teammates faceplant and having decided that I didn't want to follow suit.)

The other thing I recalled was his insistance that a lineman adopt the same stance whether the play was a run to his side (for which he would charge forward off the line) or a run to the opposite side or a pass (for which he would drop back off the line), so that his stance wouldn't telegraph the play to the defence.

Thus was born the idea of terms we use based on obsolete ideas.

We've had several threads about the things that children these days will never know: telephone booths, TV test patterns, whatever.

I thought it would be fun to have a thread about terms we use based on things that children will never know.

As a first installment, I proffer the verb telegraph.

Ditto for . . . well . . . ditto.
ClintonMagus
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Southwestern Southeast
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"Type"

"Percolator"
Things are more like they are today than they've ever been before...
critter
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Spokane, WA
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I have a couple of percolators. But I've also spent a lot of time outdoors Smile
"The fool is one who doesn't know what you have just found out."
~Will Rogers
Woland
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Not quite what you are looking for, but what about "I will tannoy the news as soon as it comes in."

"Newsreel."

"The Classic Comics version."
critter
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Spokane, WA
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Carbon Copy
"The fool is one who doesn't know what you have just found out."
~Will Rogers
mastermindreader
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Seattle, WA
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Video tape
mastermindreader
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Seattle, WA
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Quote:
On 2012-06-29 13:16, critter wrote:
Carbon Copy


Except for mentalists, who have an increasingly hard time finding the stuff!
tommy
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Devil’s Island
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As an aside I know a farmer who makes as good sideline selling show jumpers to the rich and famous for their kids birthdays etc. His daughter is a champion and she demonstrates them etc making them look wonderful and creating the illusion they are worth a lot more than they are.
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
gdw
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This one's on its way out, and used all the time when shooting digital, "film" and "filming."
It's amazing, people will criticize you for "biting the hand that feeds you," while they're busy praising the hand that beats them.

"You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one."

I won't forget you Robert.
Marlin1894
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Describing some one who repeats themselves as sounding like a "broken record"

"Dialing" a telephone.
critter
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Swashbuckling.
"The fool is one who doesn't know what you have just found out."
~Will Rogers
Marlin1894
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Quote:
On 2012-06-29 14:46, Marlin1894 wrote:
Describing some one who repeats themselves as sounding like a "broken record"

"Dialing" a telephone.


Along the same lines; Being "in the groove", and "hanging" up the phone.
mastermindreader
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Except you can still "hang up" on a land line phone. (They still exist believe it or not!)
Marlin1894
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Quote:
On 2012-06-29 15:00, mastermindreader wrote:
Except you can still "hang up" on a land line phone. (They still exist believe it or not!)


Why you gotta go all Balducci on me?

Someone is going to probably say that for almost every example. There are probably people who still play around with telegraphs as a hobby. Or use "film" or "tape" to record events etc. But for the most part the saying is based on something that was once commonplace that is now practically extinct. Sayings like "hang up" and "dial" are fairly common terms. There are certainly people who never "hung up", or "dialed", a phone in their life who use those terms daily.
mastermindreader
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I agree with you. Just busting.

But I always thought that "in the groove" was originally a reference that came from bowling. You know, hitting the worn groove in the lane to score repeated strikes.

:eek:
Marlin1894
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Quote:
On 2012-06-29 15:26, mastermindreader wrote:
I agree with you. Just busting.

But I always thought that "in the groove" was originally a reference that came from bowling. You know, hitting the worn groove in the lane to score repeated strikes.

:eek:


I know. I just took advantage of your comment to take a shot at Balducci out of left field. lol

You may be right about the bowling. Now I'm not sure.
Woland
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I think that "in the groove" did not originate with bowling, nor with phonograph records.
critter
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Perv.
"The fool is one who doesn't know what you have just found out."
~Will Rogers
balducci
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Quote:
On 2012-06-29 15:34, Marlin1894 wrote:

I know. I just took advantage of your comment to take a shot at Balducci out of left field. lol

:rolleyes:
Make America Great Again! - Trump in 2020 ... "We're a capitalistic society. I go into business, I don't make it, I go bankrupt. They're not going to bail me out. I've been on welfare and food stamps. Did anyone help me? No." - Craig T. Nelson, actor.
Woland
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What I also enjoy are the purportedly nautical origins of everyday expressions, most of them quite fanciful and undocumented. Just yesterday I heard someone described as "sharp as the butt end of a rowboat."
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