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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The Science of Magic » » What are the best science "tricks" for a close up magician? (3 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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AdamChance
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I've been doing magic as a hobby for about a year now. I mainly do close up stuff (cards, coins, etc.) and some mentalism type of tricks. I perform mostly just for friends/family or random people at bars or parties or where ever. I recently decided that it would be fun to add in some puzzles to my routines, and the people in the puzzle sub-forum recommended some great little puzzles and games that are a lot of fun.

so I figured it would also be cool to also have a few neat science type of effects. it doesn't necessarily have to be a magic trick... really just anything that is interesting and will entertain random people. so tricks can either be presented as another magic trick... or presented as just a cool science type of thing.

and I also don't want to have big elaborate props... ideally something you could put in your pockets or a small back pack or something. no glass breaking... no super messy stuff, etc.

what science effects are good for this? what's a good place to start learning these things? books, dvds, websites, youtube channels, etc.? if anyone could recommended a few science effects that would be entertaining for close up work... that would be much appreciated.
AdamChance
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Newton's Nightmare / Lenz Law seems to be an appropriate science trick for close up magic.

what other ones would be good?
link8822
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Get a bottle and straw. Rub the straw on your shirt to build up static electricity, then balance it on top of the bottle, on the cap. Then you can use your finger to make the straw spin around. There's a lot of cool science effects on quirkology youtube channel from Richard Wiseman (that's where I got this one from):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYK3W9Wqb......ure=plcp
ClintonMagus
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A very good friend of mine is a chemistry professor at a local university. Every year he does a demonstration for incoming freshmen of many "magical" scientific priciples. One of the many things that he does involves chemical color changes to the 1812 Overture.

Also, here's a site that might be of interest:

http://chemistry.about.com/od/chemistrym......icks.htm
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Stromberg
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During FISM 2012 Jan Logemann did a wonderful transpo of what seemed to be water into glass (clear plastic). Very powerful, very nice, done in the spectators hand.

/Stromberg
Tom Jorgenson
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Martin Gardner did a great book called "Science Magic" that you may be able to track down and read. It was done in both HB and Paperback.

If you Google it a bit, or try ABEBOOKS or ALIBRIS, you should be able to come up with a half dozen titles on the subject that would help. Most will be children's books, but that's fine.
We dance an invisible dance to music they cannot hear.
MagicJim
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I am a magician and science teacher and science entertainer of 15 years. I am producing a book and dvd entitled "Science Tricks & Stunts". I should be complete by Dec '12.
MagicJim
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Here are some quick thoughts...
!) straw thru potato
2) ping pong ball levitation w/ hair dryer
3) soccer ball levitation with leaf blower
4) needle thru balloon
5) water monte
Inert
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A lot of Lubor Fiedler's stuff combines science & perception into close-up effects.
AlexWong
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Balancing two forks using a toothpick on the edge of a glass:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czsoNaf4MeY

Or just some bar tricks to play around (10 bets you can't lose):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oaR3TJjNUE8
Julie
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Some of the visual/optical illusion-type goodies such as the Wow! card trick and a selection from Tenyo items including Inert's suggestion would be scientifically appropriate, too.

Julie
yaquimagic
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Shake a can of soda real good(not diet), then flick the side of it a few times with your finger and to your auidence surprise it does not gush outor exploed. I would recommend you practice it a few times before you demonstrate it. Enjoy
Andy Young
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Pen in Bottle (pen is on top of a hoop and the hoop is on top of the bottle, hoop is pulled away and pen falls into bottle). This shows interia.
Ball Bounce (take a basket ball and a tenis ball, drop the basket ball with the tennis ball on top and when they hit the tennis ball bounces high while the basket ball stays put) Conservation of Energy
vampiro
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Magnets and magnetism provide so many possibilities. I am an inventor and recently invented something with ND magnets.
There are a couple of excellent books on the subject, but they are not specifically about magic tricks.

But I think a demonstration of natural properties (even of something little known and surprising), followed by a
a magic trick could be perhaps the ultimate science trick!
Good thoughts, magicians!
Horatio
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I once saw somebody do a very nice routine with a Cartesian diver:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G3_yiwyezPY
He was talking to the thing and it kept responding (I can't remember whether it went up for 'yes' and down for 'no' or what), but the squeezing of his hand on the bottle as he held it in the air was pretty imperceptible, even though I knew to look for it!

I know static electricity has been mentioned, but there are lots of variations in this clip:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxZ6AWLpnUw
Just make sure it's not a humid day!
These may provide novelty too:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6v8wm7_v......index=49
djurmann
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Quote:
On 2012-07-13 21:38, link8822 wrote:
Get a bottle and straw. Rub the straw on your shirt to build up static electricity, then balance it on top of the bottle, on the cap. Then you can use your finger to make the straw spin around. There's a lot of cool science effects on quirkology youtube channel from Richard Wiseman (that's where I got this one from):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYK3W9Wqb......ure=plcp


This can be made more deceptive by using a straw wrapped in paper. When you unwrap the straw hold the wrapping a little bit firmly as you drag the straw out - the static builds up without you having done anything overt.

Danny
Pakar Ilusi
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Bar bets are best.

Then you get free drinks. Smile
"Dreams aren't a matter of Chance but a matter of Choice." -DC-
J-L Sparrow
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In Joshua Jay's book "Magic: The Complete Course" he explains a trick that uses "Science!"

He calls the trick "Four Elements," and it is done with a saucer, an empty glass, some water, a lemon wedge, and a book of matches. (I've found that you can use a small birthday candle in place of the lemon wedge and the matches, provided you have something to light the candle with.)

Make sure there is adult supervision, as fire is involved. (I take no responsibility for any injuries or damages incurred as a result of performing this trick.)

Basically, you pour water into a saucer, and stand lit a match/candle in the middle of the saucer. Then you overturn an empty glass so that it completely covers the match/candle. Once the flame goes out, the water in the saucer will actually get sucked up into the glass!

I won't go over the details here, but it's a cute little trick that's more science than illusion.
Horatio
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The trick from Joshua Jay's book could probably be improved by using fruit juice instead of water to make the visual impression much stronger. A block of solid colour moving into the glass against gravity will also be seen from further away.
55john55
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Tie string or rope to two fixed objects (suspend rope between two chairs). Then make two identical pendulums (equal lengths and same objects). Tie pendulums to the suspended string (make sure there is reasonable space between the pendulums) and swing ONE pendulum. Then don't touch anything. One pendulum will start up from no swing as the first reduces its swing. The first one stops entirely. Then the process will reverse itself. Try different objects having different masses but keep the length of the pendulum the same.
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