The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workers » » Me playing with my christmas present. (Ambitious card routine) (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3~4~5~6 [Next]
mlippo
View Profile
Inner circle
Trieste (Italy)
1007 Posts

Profile of mlippo
Quote:
On 2012-12-30 12:01, Bandaloop wrote:
I'm not sure how well calling him "Larry" is going to go over Smile


Ouch! That's the grappa effect I'm afraid... :-D
Sorry Harry!

mlippo

P.S.: I wrote "Harry" at the beginning of the post, though ...
Harry Lorayne
View Profile
V.I.P.
New York City
8302 Posts

Profile of Harry Lorayne
Yes, thanks for that great plug opportunity, mlippo. Don't know what I'd do without those great "openings" of yours. And, of course, you have great, really GREAT, taste. With me, guess it must be the vodka!! Unfortunately, I've not read any of your stuff, so can't say whether or not I like or don't like it. Although, doubt if I'd do that, anyway. I've read I'm sure MUCH MORE than you have, and my attitude over the decades (two of those decades in APOCALYPSE) has been to either plug something or NOT MENTION IT AT ALL. I don't think that over the decades (that's about SEVEN of them!!!) I've said I didn't like something of someone else's perhaps twice - and then, I usually had a personal reason for that (like someone teaching one of things - badly, perhaps). Anyway, to each his own - there's obviously no way I would do it your way. Harry L.
[email]harrylorayne@earthlink.net[/email]

http://www.harrylorayne.com
http://www.harryloraynemagic.com
mlippo
View Profile
Inner circle
Trieste (Italy)
1007 Posts

Profile of mlippo
Quote:
On 2012-12-30 13:00, Harry Lorayne wrote:
Yes, thanks for that great plug opportunity, mlippo. Don't know what I'd do without those great "openings" of yours. And, of course, you have great, really GREAT, taste. With me, guess it must be the vodka!! Unfortunately, I've not read any of your stuff, so can't say whether or not I like or don't like it. Although, doubt if I'd do that, anyway. I've read I'm sure MUCH MORE than you have, and my attitude over the decades (two of those decades in APOCALYPSE) has been to either plug something or NOT MENTION IT AT ALL. I don't think that over the decades (that's about SEVEN of them!!!) I've said I didn't like something of someone else's perhaps twice - and then, I usually had a personal reason for that (like someone teaching one of things - badly, perhaps). Anyway, to each his own - there's obviously no way I would do it your way. Harry L.


Sorry, but I do not get it! I just said that your AC routine is not one of the ones I'd praise, but I also said that you have published good card magic. I have never said that my stuff is better than any other's... I do not have any stuff, no problems admitting it.
I don't play any instrument, but nonetheless I can have my tastes in music and say what I like and what I don't. What's the difference with magic in this case? Or painting or any other kind of art?

mlippo
Harry Lorayne
View Profile
V.I.P.
New York City
8302 Posts

Profile of Harry Lorayne
No problem. There are opinions and opinions - you know the cliche, they're like *******s, everyone has one. In MY opinion, some opinions should not be stated publicly. That's it. Simple. That's MY opinion. Oh, and there is a LARGE difference between music, art, etc. They are not "niche" areas as is magic. There is quite a difference. If I say I really don't like Van Gogh, there's no way that opinion can hurt the Van Gogh estate, if there is such a thing. If I say I just LOVE Toulouse Lautrec - that sure "ain't" gonna help sell his paintings, since they sure as h*ll need no help from me. But if I say "opinionwise" that I LOVE Joe Blow's book on making animals disappear, that might just sell a few of Joe Blow's books within our "niche" society. And if I state "opinionwise" that I think Joe Blow's book on coin tricks is terrible - it may just hurt his sales in this "niche" society/milieu - SO I DON'T SAY IT, not publicly anyway. Sorry; from yours above I realize that you simply don't understand all this, so forgive me for stating my opinions. Sorry.
[email]harrylorayne@earthlink.net[/email]

http://www.harrylorayne.com
http://www.harryloraynemagic.com
Zombie Magic
View Profile
Inner circle
I went out for a beer and now have
8737 Posts

Profile of Zombie Magic
Harry Lorayne's Ambitious Card:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qp5fCdkipFE

It was in Harry's book Close-up Card Magic ( 1962 ) as "Lorayne's Ambitious Card Routine".

Much of it ended up in other Magician's books and later videos/DVD's. lol. That's how good it was/is.
ilmungo
View Profile
Loyal user
271 Posts

Profile of ilmungo
When I first started out in magic, like everybody else, I sucked for a while before getting decent. But magic is often a lonely pursuit, you hope that you're making progress at this business of "being deceiving," but it's hard to keep going on your own. Most people, as they're starting out, don't have many opportunities to perform for supportive strangers, and more to the point, you want to know whether the stuff you've been practicing actually works, whether you're getting any good. So what's a young magician to do? These days, you can put a video of yourself doing what you've been practicing on youtube, and see what people think.

So, for me, I was trying to figure out what I could film that wouldn't rely heavily on misdirection or be too obvious for a camera, and I settled on Triumph. Being a novice, of course, I hadn't yet read Stars of Magic, but after watching videos on youtube obsessively (not tutorials, performances), I worked out the correct method, then practiced it, and put it up. Retrospectively, it was an abysmal performance by my standards of today; but it would have fooled your average layman, although it probably looked quite "cozy". But I made the mistake of putting up a video of one of the holy effects in card magic, created by one of the holy caryatids of magic.

The first comment on my video was a kid destroying me completely, calling my performance an insult to magic, suggesting in very strong language that I do us all a favor and quit magic and take up stamp collecting, or better yet, die. He had obviously read the story about Vernon chewing up the inept magician, and was channeling that energy. Luckily, I picked up magic at the ripe age of 30, so I wasn't too shaken by it, but I still got defensive about it, dismissed the feedback, and clung to my guns, basically stating: "Look, I know it's not perfect, but you don't have to be a jerk about it, how about some constructive criticism?" Sound familiar?

Slowly other comments started coming in which were helpful and encouraging (including Kent Gunn, with some good counsel on things that needed work), but ultimately, I had to dig deeper and find my own way to make that handling, and the quality of my card magic in general, better than it was. The first step was to let go of my ego and admit that, yes, that performance had big problems, and the bar should be much higher.

I have been thinking about that interaction several times in the last few years, because I can't quite decide whether it was helpful or not. Did I get better, at least partially, because of it, or in spite of it?

I think that, if I had been a 16 year old kid and therefore more sensitive to what others think of me, I might have been completely crushed by that first response, and would have gone hiding under a rock, never to pick up a deck of cards again. I am very very happy I didn't do that, and while I still have a loooong way to go, I can honestly say my handling and, more importantly, performing skills are reaching the point where I can go in front of an audience, do a show, and they will walk away happy to have seen it.

But, on the other hand, without that first slap in the face I might not have realized that I needed to put some serious additional work into this magic thing before it was "good" by my would-be peers' standards. I might not have realized that there is "fooling laymen", and "performing magic well", and a rather large gap between the two. Because, guys, when I look back at that video (I have since removed it from youtube, don't worry) I cringe at how crappy it was.

This whole reminiscence is my way of reflecting on the difference between criticism, critique, and mentorship. It's easy and immediate to throw criticism at somebody's face, it takes no effort or thought on your part; it's harder to critique a performance trying to spot the good parts and the ones that need work, and what that work might be. And it is harder still to actually teach somebody how to get better.

Let me contrast that first story with another. A few months later I discovered that there is a place where I could go and meet other freaks like me, called a magic shop. One day I met another dude there who was chatting with the owner like they were old friends, and exuded an air of competence about cards. I was working through my Erdnase at the time, so I found the courage to ask him whether he could give me a couple of pointers on this sleight I was working on, the diagonal palm shift. Turns out that dude was Dorian Rhodell, who, in addition to being a badass card man, learned the DPS from Paul Chosse himself, so he's got a mean one. But more to the point: he asked me to show him how I would use it in a trick. I did so, certainly embarrassing myself in the process. But he didn't laugh at me, instead he went: "ok, so here's a couple of things..." and proceeded to break it down. Then he went a step further, and invited me to his show that night, saying he would throw in three DPSs in the second trick just for me, so I could see how the timing works in reality. I went, and I still missed the first one, even knowing it was coming, but got the drift, and it was a great lesson.

My point is Dorian took the time to be a mentor, not just tell me I sucked, even though he didn't know me from Adam. But also my attitude played a big part in it: I can now see that my first video posted on youtube came from a place of insecurity and needing to be "validated" by this nebulous community of magicians, I was really hoping that everybody would just take a look and go: "yep, you got it, keep up the good work." When I asked Dorian for advice, instead, I was actually ready to learn and put some work in.

So, my question to Nicholas is: are you ready to learn, or did you just want some validation?

Respectfully,
Luigi
Nicholas Night
View Profile
New user
Lansing Mi
93 Posts

Profile of Nicholas Night
Quote:
On 2012-12-30 19:21, ilmungo wrote:
When I first started out in magic, like everybody else, I sucked for a while before getting decent. But magic is often a lonely pursuit, you hope that you're making progress at this business of "being deceiving," but it's hard to keep going on your own. Most people, as they're starting out, don't have many opportunities to perform for supportive strangers, and more to the point, you want to know whether the stuff you've been practicing actually works, whether you're getting any good. So what's a young magician to do? These days, you can put a video of yourself doing what you've been practicing on youtube, and see what people think.

So, for me, I was trying to figure out what I could film that wouldn't rely heavily on misdirection or be too obvious for a camera, and I settled on Triumph. Being a novice, of course, I hadn't yet read Stars of Magic, but after watching videos on youtube obsessively (not tutorials, performances), I worked out the correct method, then practiced it, and put it up. Retrospectively, it was an abysmal performance by my standards of today; but it would have fooled your average layman, although it probably looked quite "cozy". But I made the mistake of putting up a video of one of the holy effects in card magic, created by one of the holy caryatids of magic.

The first comment on my video was a kid destroying me completely, calling my performance an insult to magic, suggesting in very strong language that I do us all a favor and quit magic and take up stamp collecting, or better yet, die. He had obviously read the story about Vernon chewing up the inept magician, and was channeling that energy. Luckily, I picked up magic at the ripe age of 30, so I wasn't too shaken by it, but I still got defensive about it, dismissed the feedback, and clung to my guns, basically stating: "Look, I know it's not perfect, but you don't have to be a jerk about it, how about some constructive criticism?" Sound familiar?

Slowly other comments started coming in which were helpful and encouraging (including Kent Gunn, with some good counsel on things that needed work), but ultimately, I had to dig deeper and find my own way to make that handling, and the quality of my card magic in general, better than it was. The first step was to let go of my ego and admit that, yes, that performance had big problems, and the bar should be much higher.

I have been thinking about that interaction several times in the last few years, because I can't quite decide whether it was helpful or not. Did I get better, at least partially, because of it, or in spite of it?

I think that, if I had been a 16 year old kid and therefore more sensitive to what others think of me, I might have been completely crushed by that first response, and would have gone hiding under a rock, never to pick up a deck of cards again. I am very very happy I didn't do that, and while I still have a loooong way to go, I can honestly say my handling and, more importantly, performing skills are reaching the point where I can go in front of an audience, do a show, and they will walk away happy to have seen it.

But, on the other hand, without that first slap in the face I might not have realized that I needed to put some serious additional work into this magic thing before it was "good" by my would-be peers' standards. I might not have realized that there is "fooling laymen", and "performing magic well", and a rather large gap between the two. Because, guys, when I look back at that video (I have since removed it from youtube, don't worry) I cringe at how crappy it was.

This whole reminiscence is my way of reflecting on the difference between criticism, critique, and mentorship. It's easy and immediate to throw criticism at somebody's face, it takes no effort or thought on your part; it's harder to critique a performance trying to spot the good parts and the ones that need work, and what that work might be. And it is harder still to actually teach somebody how to get better.

Let me contrast that first story with another. A few months later I discovered that there is a place where I could go and meet other freaks like me, called a magic shop. One day I met another dude there who was chatting with the owner like they were old friends, and exuded an air of competence about cards. I was working through my Erdnase at the time, so I found the courage to ask him whether he could give me a couple of pointers on this sleight I was working on, the diagonal palm shift. Turns out that dude was Dorian Rhodell, who, in addition to being a badass card man, learned the DPS from Paul Chosse himself, so he's got a mean one. But more to the point: he asked me to show him how I would use it in a trick. I did so, certainly embarrassing myself in the process. But he didn't laugh at me, instead he went: "ok, so here's a couple of things..." and proceeded to break it down. Then he went a step further, and invited me to his show that night, saying he would throw in three DPSs in the second trick just for me, so I could see how the timing works in reality. I went, and I still missed the first one, even knowing it was coming, but got the drift, and it was a great lesson.

My point is Dorian took the time to be a mentor, not just tell me I sucked, even though he didn't know me from Adam. But also my attitude played a big part in it: I can now see that my first video posted on youtube came from a place of insecurity and needing to be "validated" by this nebulous community of magicians, I was really hoping that everybody would just take a look and go: "yep, you got it, keep up the good work." When I asked Dorian for advice, instead, I was actually ready to learn and put some work in.

So, my question to Nicholas is: are you ready to learn, or did you just want some validation?

Respectfully,
Luigi


I wish I knew of a magic shop near me!

To answer your question. Both. I want to learn, and I'd like the validation, When I get it right I haven't gotten it right yet, so for now. Just the learning.
Flyswatter
View Profile
Veteran user
370 Posts

Profile of Flyswatter
I don't know about you Nicolas, but I would feel so accomplished as to having Steven Youell and Harry Loryane and Jamie D. Grant post in your thread lol. As for the so called "harsh" criticism remarks. I've been to some really harsh feedback sites called the Youtube that many people on the internet are just, trolls. However, I see nothing wrong with all these "harsh" remarks to be honest, you take it, you consider, you learn, you move on, you improve. I think many suggestions here are spot on. I'm not much of a card man myself, and I'm learning as well, but to be honest, I could not finish your video, sorry, didn't grab my attention at all, the comments on this thread was much more entertaining. Although after writing this I will finish watching it. Just remember: Keep going! We will all improve with time (with proper materials) Smile
Flyswatter
View Profile
Veteran user
370 Posts

Profile of Flyswatter
Quote:
On 2012-12-30 19:21, ilmungo wrote:
When I first started out in magic, like everybody else, I sucked for a while before getting decent. But magic is often a lonely pursuit, you hope that you're making progress at this business of "being deceiving," but it's hard to keep going on your own. Most people, as they're starting out, don't have many opportunities to perform for supportive strangers, and more to the point, you want to know whether the stuff you've been practicing actually works, whether you're getting any good. So what's a young magician to do? These days, you can put a video of yourself doing what you've been practicing on youtube, and see what people think.

So, for me, I was trying to figure out what I could film that wouldn't rely heavily on misdirection or be too obvious for a camera, and I settled on Triumph. Being a novice, of course, I hadn't yet read Stars of Magic, but after watching videos on youtube obsessively (not tutorials, performances), I worked out the correct method, then practiced it, and put it up. Retrospectively, it was an abysmal performance by my standards of today; but it would have fooled your average layman, although it probably looked quite "cozy". But I made the mistake of putting up a video of one of the holy effects in card magic, created by one of the holy caryatids of magic.

The first comment on my video was a kid destroying me completely, calling my performance an insult to magic, suggesting in very strong language that I do us all a favor and quit magic and take up stamp collecting, or better yet, die. He had obviously read the story about Vernon chewing up the inept magician, and was channeling that energy. Luckily, I picked up magic at the ripe age of 30, so I wasn't too shaken by it, but I still got defensive about it, dismissed the feedback, and clung to my guns, basically stating: "Look, I know it's not perfect, but you don't have to be a jerk about it, how about some constructive criticism?" Sound familiar?

Slowly other comments started coming in which were helpful and encouraging (including Kent Gunn, with some good counsel on things that needed work), but ultimately, I had to dig deeper and find my own way to make that handling, and the quality of my card magic in general, better than it was. The first step was to let go of my ego and admit that, yes, that performance had big problems, and the bar should be much higher.

I have been thinking about that interaction several times in the last few years, because I can't quite decide whether it was helpful or not. Did I get better, at least partially, because of it, or in spite of it?

I think that, if I had been a 16 year old kid and therefore more sensitive to what others think of me, I might have been completely crushed by that first response, and would have gone hiding under a rock, never to pick up a deck of cards again. I am very very happy I didn't do that, and while I still have a loooong way to go, I can honestly say my handling and, more importantly, performing skills are reaching the point where I can go in front of an audience, do a show, and they will walk away happy to have seen it.

But, on the other hand, without that first slap in the face I might not have realized that I needed to put some serious additional work into this magic thing before it was "good" by my would-be peers' standards. I might not have realized that there is "fooling laymen", and "performing magic well", and a rather large gap between the two. Because, guys, when I look back at that video (I have since removed it from youtube, don't worry) I cringe at how crappy it was.

This whole reminiscence is my way of reflecting on the difference between criticism, critique, and mentorship. It's easy and immediate to throw criticism at somebody's face, it takes no effort or thought on your part; it's harder to critique a performance trying to spot the good parts and the ones that need work, and what that work might be. And it is harder still to actually teach somebody how to get better.

Let me contrast that first story with another. A few months later I discovered that there is a place where I could go and meet other freaks like me, called a magic shop. One day I met another dude there who was chatting with the owner like they were old friends, and exuded an air of competence about cards. I was working through my Erdnase at the time, so I found the courage to ask him whether he could give me a couple of pointers on this sleight I was working on, the diagonal palm shift. Turns out that dude was Dorian Rhodell, who, in addition to being a badass card man, learned the DPS from Paul Chosse himself, so he's got a mean one. But more to the point: he asked me to show him how I would use it in a trick. I did so, certainly embarrassing myself in the process. But he didn't laugh at me, instead he went: "ok, so here's a couple of things..." and proceeded to break it down. Then he went a step further, and invited me to his show that night, saying he would throw in three DPSs in the second trick just for me, so I could see how the timing works in reality. I went, and I still missed the first one, even knowing it was coming, but got the drift, and it was a great lesson.

My point is Dorian took the time to be a mentor, not just tell me I sucked, even though he didn't know me from Adam. But also my attitude played a big part in it: I can now see that my first video posted on youtube came from a place of insecurity and needing to be "validated" by this nebulous community of magicians, I was really hoping that everybody would just take a look and go: "yep, you got it, keep up the good work." When I asked Dorian for advice, instead, I was actually ready to learn and put some work in.

So, my question to Nicholas is: are you ready to learn, or did you just want some validation?

Respectfully,
Luigi


That was a great read. Thank you for sharing your story.
Steven Youell
View Profile
V.I.P.
3866 Posts

Profile of Steven Youell
Quote:
On 2012-12-30 10:46, Bandaloop wrote:
I think Steven's point wasn't that there shouldn't be any criticism, but that if there is it should be followed up with something constructive, such as you just did by pointing him in the right direction. You can be harsh, but being harsh and offering nothing else beyond insults doesn't help anyone.

You are correct. That was exactly my point.

sey
Steven Youell
View Profile
V.I.P.
3866 Posts

Profile of Steven Youell
Quote:
On 2012-12-30 10:30, mlippo wrote:
I don't want to offend you, but this is what I call bad routining and poor practise! Nothing else! Am I harsh? Yes, sure I am!

You're not only harsh, you're wrong. Simply telling someone that their problem is bad routining and poor practice is similar to a doctor giving a diagnosis and telling the paitent that now he knows what the problem is, so he should be able to find a treatment himself.

I have an idea-- why don't you send me a link to something you've done and I'll give you two different critiques: the first one will be the type you advocate here and the second will be of the type that I advocate. That might clarify the differences for you.

Quote:
On 2012-12-30 11:45, mlippo wrote:
If he's paying you for help, then this could justify your public defense of his working.

1) I'm not defending anything in the video.
2) If you're implying that my motivation for posting here is monetary, then I find that insulting. But for the record, he's not paying me. I offered to help him privately and at no cost.

sey
Steven Youell
View Profile
V.I.P.
3866 Posts

Profile of Steven Youell
In general, I want Uli and Millipo to know that I understand their frustration. I've always said that Magic Clubs end up being counter-productive because they depend on dues to exist. That means that the first priority is to recruit and maintain members. This puts the priority on protecting fragile egos at the expense of honest critique.

The internet has made things even worse, though. Now we have people posting videos who have had little or no magic education other than what they find on the internet. Even worse, the internet seems to foster the attitude that if someone offers their opinion, that opinion has just as much as credibility as anyone else's opinion. Anonymous critics abound with their advice and we're not even sure if they've ever held a deck of cards in front of an audience. Some of this advice is good, but most of it is not and we're leaving it up to the recipient to decide which is which.

Unfortunately, taking the opposite approach and just telling people they suck will not fix this. In fact, it will probably do the opposite. If we throw insults at everyone who posts bad videos, then fewer people will post videos. And if fewer people post videos, we won't even know they're out there doing bad magic, and we certainly would not have the opportunity to correct them.

There are probably dozens of people on this forum (including Nicholas) that I've sent a message to that is similar to this:

Quote:
You shouldn't post videos like that-- you weren't ready to perform that effect yet. I would be glad to help you, but you need to know that I'll be brutal. But I won't just tell you why something sucks, I'll tell you how to fix it and do it better. So if your feelings are hurt easily, then just tell me and I won't offer opinions or advice. But if you have the ability to take the criticism and learn from it, then let me know and we'll begin.

Not once has my advice been refused. Not because I'm some sort of SuperStar, but because most of them knew I was at least qualified to give advice, I warned them of the sting that was to come and told them that it had a purpose that would be helpful to them. Sometimes the advice is limited to a specific move or effect and other times it's grown to a sort of "internet mentorship".

Now look-- I'm no saint. I've made dozens and dozens of mistakes in the world of magic. And I mean horrible, awful mistakes that hurt people. I regret all of them and it's my guess that over time I'll find more of them to regret in my past. So I am just as guilty as anyone else in this thread of proferring the "YOU SUCK" type of critique. But I don't think I've done that for years.

I know that the approach I just described works. I know it works because of the number of other approachs I used that were NOT effective. I know it works because it was what my mentors used to bring me around when I was young. It works. I'm not under any delusion that I'll change the entire world of magic, but I'm old enough now to know that just changing how a few dozen people look at magic is significant.

Wow. That's enough words from me for now... sorry for rambling.

sey
Flyswatter
View Profile
Veteran user
370 Posts

Profile of Flyswatter
Quote:
On 2012-12-31 00:01, Steven Youell wrote:
In general, I want Uli and Millipo to know that I understand their frustration. I've always said that Magic Clubs end up being counter-productive because they depend on dues to exist. That means that the first priority is to recruit and maintain members. This puts the priority on protecting fragile egos at the expense of honest critique.

The internet has made things even worse, though. Now we have people posting videos who have had little or no magic education other than what they find on the internet. Even worse, the internet seems to foster the attitude that if someone offers their opinion, that opinion has just as much as credibility as anyone else's opinion. Anonymous critics abound with their advice and we're not even sure if they've ever held a deck of cards in front of an audience. Some of this advice is good, but most of it is not and we're leaving it up to the recipient to decide which is which.

Unfortunately, taking the opposite approach and just telling people they suck will not fix this. In fact, it will probably do the opposite. If we throw insults at everyone who posts bad videos, then fewer people will post videos. And if fewer people post videos, we won't even know they're out there doing bad magic, and we certainly would not have the opportunity to correct them.

There are probably dozens of people on this forum (including Nicholas) that I've sent a message to that is similar to this:

Quote:
You shouldn't post videos like that-- you weren't ready to perform that effect yet. I would be glad to help you, but you need to know that I'll be brutal. But I won't just tell you why something sucks, I'll tell you how to fix it and do it better. So if your feelings are hurt easily, then just tell me and I won't offer opinions or advice. But if you have the ability to take the criticism and learn from it, then let me know and we'll begin.

Not once has my advice been refused. Not because I'm some sort of SuperStar, but because most of them knew I was at least qualified to give advice, I warned them of the sting that was to come and told them that it had a purpose that would be helpful to them. Sometimes the advice is limited to a specific move or effect and other times it's grown to a sort of "internet mentorship".

Now look-- I'm no saint. I've made dozens and dozens of mistakes in the world of magic. And I mean horrible, awful mistakes that hurt people. I regret all of them and it's my guess that over time I'll find more of them to regret in my past. So I am just as guilty as anyone else in this thread of proferring the "YOU SUCK" type of critique. But I don't think I've done that for years.

I know that the approach I just described works. I know it works because of the number of other approachs I used that were NOT effective. I know it works because it was what my mentors used to bring me around when I was young. It works. I'm not under any delusion that I'll change the entire world of magic, but I'm old enough now to know that just changing how a few dozen people look at magic is significant.

Wow. That's enough words from me for now... sorry for rambling.

sey


Oh man, don't be sorry at all! Very eye opening Smile
Bandaloop
View Profile
Regular user
Dodging attacks for the past
194 Posts

Profile of Bandaloop
You know -- One thing that Nicholas should be given credit for, which he hasn't, is that he put this up on You Tube and set it so only those with the link could see it. He could very easily have just uploaded it with no filter for the whole world to see. He obviously realizes that not every trick that is recorded should be plastered across the web. In that, he's light years ahead of most budding magicians.
Billy-one
View Profile
Inner circle
IOWA
1028 Posts

Profile of Billy-one
Mr. Youell,

I never got a message like that Smile

Billy
Corbett
View Profile
Inner circle
Indiana
1155 Posts

Profile of Corbett
I'm guessing the OP has never seen really good magic, done really well. For example, if he had seen either live or in video, a professionally done Ambitious Card, perhaps he would see his own routine for what it is, and think twice about posting it publicly.
LiquidSn
View Profile
Elite user
New York
472 Posts

Profile of LiquidSn
Nicholas Night,

Card College Vol.1

Close the thread.
Blog about magic. by me.

Http://www.doublefacers.com
Harry Lorayne
View Profile
V.I.P.
New York City
8302 Posts

Profile of Harry Lorayne
Yeah, close the thread - LiquidSn has spoken!!! Amazing.
[email]harrylorayne@earthlink.net[/email]

http://www.harrylorayne.com
http://www.harryloraynemagic.com
mlippo
View Profile
Inner circle
Trieste (Italy)
1007 Posts

Profile of mlippo
Quote:
On 2013-01-03 14:07, LiquidSn wrote:
Nicholas Night,

Card College Vol.1

Close the thread.


I would add Card College 2 as well, since a good Ambitious Card routine for beginners is there (along with many other sleights and effects and a wonderful chapter on theory which everyone should study!).

mlippo
Steven Youell
View Profile
V.I.P.
3866 Posts

Profile of Steven Youell
Card Psalm 88:

All Hail Card College-- the sole resource anyone needs to learn Card Magic!
Card College and ONLY Card College will set you on the paths to righteousness!

Cursed are Hugard & Braue-- they are false gods who will lead you NOT unto salvation.
Cursed are Vernon & Marlo-- their spirits quiver in fear at the power of Giobbi.

Keep the law of Card College in your heart so you may not sin against the perfection
of Sleight of Hand.

If a beginner should stray from the righteous path of Card College, let him be
relegated to only doing the glide and working with small, dry hands.

If a Cardman dare suggest any other resource of help, let him be mocked in public,
shamed on the internet and banished from the Inner Circle.

Yea, those who do not worship Card College are anathema to all those who know
the true source of all perfection in Sleight of Hand: CARD COLLEGE!

ALL HAIL CARD COLLEGE!

<cue golden calf>
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workers » » Me playing with my christmas present. (Ambitious card routine) (0 Likes)
 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3~4~5~6 [Next]
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2019 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.42 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL