The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Shuffled not Stirred » » Memorized deck mastery (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page 1~2 [Next]
pnielan
View Profile
Regular user
Northern California
151 Posts

Profile of pnielan
Once you know your stack of choice, drilling by mentally going from number to card or card to number is of course useful. But it gets stale.

Recently I've done this. Divide a deck into two face down piles: 1-26 and 27-52. Randomly take a few cards from the 27-52 half and place them in the 1-26 half. Shuffle. Now try to find the "stranger" cards by looking at the faces of shuffled half. Repeat until the 27-52 pile is gone.

If you are relatively new to your stack, you can get quick reinforcement by having the 1-26 cards red and the 27-52 cards blue. The faces should be identical in design and age of course.

You can repeat this a level lower with 1-13 and 14-26 for example.
pnielan
View Profile
Regular user
Northern California
151 Posts

Profile of pnielan
One omitted step: After finding the "stranger cards", remove them and place them in a discard pile.
Atom3339
View Profile
Inner circle
Spokane, WA
3242 Posts

Profile of Atom3339
Yep. That works!
TH

Occupy Your Dream
Atom3339
View Profile
Inner circle
Spokane, WA
3242 Posts

Profile of Atom3339
Other ideas that have worked for me:

-Name number locations of any Four-Of-A-Kind

-Name number locations of Straights (A-K) and Royal Flush's in CHaSeD order

-Name the the cards in numerical DESCENDING order, from 52 to 1

-Name the cards starting from a different beginning point, such as the 26th card, center of deck; 26 to 25; or start at 10, 20, 30; or 13, 26, 36, etc.

-Name the Odd cards; name the Even cards

Some ideas I've enjoyed using.
TH

Occupy Your Dream
Demitri
View Profile
Loyal user
286 Posts

Profile of Demitri
Some really great tips there, atom. I am going to use these as refreshers!
iasoncl
View Profile
New user
5 Posts

Profile of iasoncl
Good stuff.
A couple of other ideas I use:

I have an old deck on which I have written the stack number on the back of each card. Shuffle the deck, cut about half the deck and turn one half face up. Shuffle the face-up and face-down halves together well. So now you have a completely random sequence of face-up and face-down cards. Go through the deck, starting from the top, determining the stack number if you have a face-up card, or the card value if you see a stack number. Once done, turn the deck over (so that the cards that were face up are now face down, and the cards that were face down are now face up), shuffle well, and repeat.

The second method I use is the following: all cards are face down and the deck is well shuffled. I take the first card and look at the stack number on the back. I have to get the card value right, and also the card before and after it. So if I am looking at a card with stack number 15 on the back, I have to determine that card's value, as well as the values of cards at stack numbers 14 and 16.
Martin Joyal
View Profile
Regular user
135 Posts

Profile of Martin Joyal
If you are using the Joyal Stack, you might find the following useful.

http://www.joyalstack.com/index.php?p=mdpj

Martin
pnielan
View Profile
Regular user
Northern California
151 Posts

Profile of pnielan
The JoyalStack web site is a resource no matter what stack you use. Good ideas abound.

Also, the Six-Hour Memorized Deck is an excellent and beautiful book, no matter what stack you use. The introduction/history to types of stacks (card systems and memorized stacks) is a very clear explanation. And there are some excellent routines in the book.

Highly recommended.
Steff
View Profile
New user
35 Posts

Profile of Steff
I have bought a "normal face/blank back" deck.
On each back I have written the number location of the card.
With this tool, there are lots of ways to exercize yourself.

My favorite :
- shuffle the deck ;
- cut in half. Reverse one of the halves.
- Shuffle again.
By now, you have a mix of face-up face-down cards.
I go through the whole deck and - of course - if it is a number, I name the card, it is the face, I give the number.

I like this exercise as it forces you to... well... how can it be explained... it forces you to "switch" your thinking mode (number->card vs card->number) frequently.
Steff
View Profile
New user
35 Posts

Profile of Steff
Oh... I forgot... Another beautiful tool is an invisible deck. Set it up with your mem deck and just train yourself with your favorite invisible deck routine.

Pretty useful as it is a "find the previous/find the next card" exercise.
Waterloophai
View Profile
Inner circle
Belgium
1233 Posts

Profile of Waterloophai
Quote:
On 2013-02-07 12:27, Steff wrote:
Oh... I forgot... Another beautiful tool is an invisible deck. Set it up with your mem deck and just train yourself with your favorite invisible deck routine.
Pretty useful as it is a "find the previous/find the next card" exercise.

I don't do the invisible deck anymore. But when I did, my deck was in MD-order and not just to excercise.
It has the advantage that there is realy no visible order in the cards for the spectator.
Every deck that I use (even when I don't need the specific order) is in MD-order.
Atom3339
View Profile
Inner circle
Spokane, WA
3242 Posts

Profile of Atom3339
I've been holding back but wanted to share what has proven to be a VERY powerful helpful technique for me. We'll call it Animate The Suits; used with visualising the cards. Here's how it works:

Each suit has it's own specific action associated with it. I'll explain it in CHaSeD order:

Club: PIcture the clover moving in a hitting action from foreground to background; as if using a wooden club to smack something.

Heart: Picture the Valentine's Day symbol pulsating like a beating heart.

Spade: A spade comes to a sharp point at the top. See the picture of pricking your index finger off that point.

Diamonds: Picture the light emanating from this brilliant gem. To add to it, see yourself holding the symbolic diamond between your fingers and slightly rotating it as if to show more shine.

NOTE: Each of these four animations have their own unique action. The Club using your hand to "hit" from back to front. The Heart opening and closing your hand simulating a beating heart. The Spade mimicking pricking your finger from the point. The Diamond displayed with your fingers and a small twirl.

This technique still works if you want to picture multiples. For example, 4C. Just pretend you see or use the action four times, hitting the air.

I'm sure many of you can see other possibilities with this idea in addition to memory deck work. I've never seen this idea in our literature. If you read it before and have historical references, that would be GREAT! IF you would like to publish this idea, either via your Website or any other means, including but not limited to books, periodicals and video, I give you my permission respectfully asking you to please credit Tom Hall (the man behind the curtain of Atom3339).

I hope you find this helpful!
TH

Occupy Your Dream
Dennis Loomis
View Profile
1943 - 2013
2113 Posts

Profile of Dennis Loomis
I think that Tom's "Animate the Suits" idea is wonderful. If you are using mnemonics to initially learn a mem-deck it would fit right in and be most helpful. It is more dramatic and thus more memorable than the standard of using words which start with the first letter of the suit, like the Ace of Clubs represented by the word Cat or the Seven of Hearts represented by the word Hog.

Remember, however, that in mastering a mem-deck these associations should fall away and you know, for example, that the Seven of Clubs in number 28 in the Aronson Stack without have to picture the mnemonic associations you used in learning.

But Tom's idea would also be very helpful when you are performing and you have to remember the name of a card which you have just glimpsed.

Thanks for sharing this "Atom3339."

Dennis "Denny" Loomis
Itinerant Montebank
<BR>http://www.loomismagic.com
JanForster
View Profile
Inner circle
Germany ... when not traveling...
3862 Posts

Profile of JanForster
Quote:
On 2013-03-18 14:37, Dennis Loomis wrote:
Remember, however, that in mastering a mem-deck these associations should fall away and you know, for example, that the Seven of Clubs in number 28 in the Aronson Stack without have to picture the mnemonic associations you used in learning.


That's so true and can't be repeated often enough... Whatever method you decide to use your goal is always to learn a secret second identity for every card which is simply a number and nothing more. Otherwise you will never reach speed and the ability to perform more complex routines using a MD. Jan
Jan Forster
www.janforster.de
yankay37
View Profile
Regular user
Canada
176 Posts

Profile of yankay37
CHaSeD is such a great stack.. but I havn't been able to find a presentation for it... once I mastered the classic fo**e.... I don't really need the CHaSeD stack...
Atom3339
View Profile
Inner circle
Spokane, WA
3242 Posts

Profile of Atom3339
Yankay37, CHaSeD helps you stay in a specific order for many tricks, including automatic tricks and multiple suit revelations.
TH

Occupy Your Dream
JanForster
View Profile
Inner circle
Germany ... when not traveling...
3862 Posts

Profile of JanForster
... and is a complete different story, it doesn't concern the theme of a MD at all ... Jan
Jan Forster
www.janforster.de
ddyment
View Profile
Inner circle
Gibsons, BC, Canada
2200 Posts

Profile of ddyment
In addition, the CHaSeD sequence is hardly the best suit order for the card worker.
Doug Dyment's Deceptionary :: Elegant, Literate, Contemporary Mentalism ... and More
Dennis Loomis
View Profile
1943 - 2013
2113 Posts

Profile of Dennis Loomis
Yankay37 suggests that CHaSeD is a stack. It's not a stack because it only relates to the order of the suits, but not the values. He also suggests that once you master the classic F***e that you don't need CHaSeD any more. These are apples and oranges. I know several good forces, but I also use a suit order for many things.

Dennis "Denny" Loomis
Itinerant Montebank
<BR>http://www.loomismagic.com
duanebarry
View Profile
Special user
883 Posts

Profile of duanebarry
Quote:
On 2013-03-22 11:34, ddyment wrote:
In addition, the CHaSeD sequence is hardly the best suit order for the card worker.

I found this a very useful article from Doug. It maps the suits to numbers in a meaningful way, very like the convention by which ESP symbols are mapped to numbers. I've found CHaSeD a clumsy mnemonic in the past. My brain much prefers this visually based 1-2-3-4 mapping.

Thanks for this!
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Shuffled not Stirred » » Memorized deck mastery (0 Likes)
 Go to page 1~2 [Next]
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2020 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.33 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL