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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Ever so sleightly » » What other classic should I study to be well rounded (1 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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cupsandballsmagic
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Not many people actually do buy it and read it but I recommend Impro by Keith Johnstone to most everyone, I think it should be required reading Smile
Bri
chucklerich
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Quote:
On 2013-03-18 07:22, cupsandballsmagic wrote:

Great list Pete! I'd like to add the ball and cone. Not because of the effect but because of what the effect will teach you about magic and performance.

I also wonder if the Bensson Bowl and Chop Cup have been around long enough to be considered classics too Smile
Bri

?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LrJ5NsgLY1o <=== this one?? I'm sorry, even forgetting what little I know about magic, I found it less than entertaining. The music was beautiful though.
Woland
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Great list, Mr. Biro. I would have to give pride of place to the egg bag.
motown
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Atlanta by way of Detroit
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"If you ever write anything about me after I'm gone, I will come back and haunt you."
– Karl Germain
foolsnobody
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Buffalo, NY
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Quote:
On 2013-03-17 17:08, Rainboguy wrote:
All of those can be found in Tarbell.


So much for the winky smiley.
charliemartin
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Rapid City, SD
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The Show Doctor by Jeff McBride is a great book. It's not just about tricks, it's about how to be a better performer. The Tarbell Course of Magic, a lifetime of knowledge. What's old is also new with a new "paint job". Anything by Pete Biro.
Alan Munro
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Kentwood, Michigan, USA
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Quote:
On 2013-03-18 14:48, chucklerich wrote:
Thanks to everyone for all the wonderful suggestions thus far. Perhaps a bit more information about my hands will be helpful. I've heard the type of hands a person has have a lot to do with what kind of sleights he can perform.

Whereas most magicians I have seen and met have "piano hands" mine look like a combination of sausage patties and tapered breakfast links. No matter how many hours I have practiced coin rolls or billiard ball production the props always end up rolling or flipping off my fingertips.

Half dollar size coins palm and finger cradle well in my hands but more than 3 coins and no matter how I try to make my hands look natural/empty they end up looking awkward/full. If I try using anything smaller than a quarter I find I have zero control of their (coins) movement.

If you want I'll try to get a couple good pics of my hands on here next to or with a half dollar. Let me know what "poses" of my hands you would find most helpful in giving advice.

I understand the Malini had stubby fingers. Mercedes Talma had small hands. They could do it. This stuff doesn't come easy at first. Some of it takes years of work. We all have to adapt techniques to what we have to work with.
shellgame-al
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Arizona, USA
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The I think these three cover most to get started; Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic,Bobo's Coin Magic and The Tarbell Course.
Manufacture of 3 Shell Game Sets & 3 Disk Monte Sets
3shells.com and magicswindles.com
Julie
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Hi chucklerich

Another basic skill to acquire is a good Paddle Move. There are tons of routines you can learn and you'll probably create new ones.

One cautionary comment: It's easy to learn to do badly, but requires some dedication to perform correctly. The good news is that once you've mastered it, that muscle memory will stay with you a lifetime.

Julie
Dave V
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Las Vegas, NV
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To follow on to Julie's post, she's right. It's easy to learn badly. Most paddle moves don't have to be 180 degrees. A wrist rotation and 90 degrees is usually all that is required.
No trees were killed in the making of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.
charliemartin
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Rapid City, SD
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Not sure what issue of Reel Magic, but Kostya Kimlat shows a great paddle move that eliminates a lot of wrist action.
Magician Shaun
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Huntington BCH, CA
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The Books of Wonder may be the single greatest resource for not only tricks but misdirection, routine's, thinking in magic, and presentation. Worth every penny you will spend to acquire them!
malaki
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Let's not forget the classics:
Our Magic by Nevil Maskelyne, David Devant
Greater Magic: A Practical Treatise on Modern Magic by John Northern Hilliard

A lot of real treasures hidden between these covers!
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Ever so sleightly » » What other classic should I study to be well rounded (1 Likes)
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