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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Books, Pamphlets & Lecture Notes » » The Art of Close Up Magic (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

bg
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I was looking at books and came across this book by Lewis Ganson.

I've not heard of it before but it looks like it could be a great book.

Does any one own this? Is it an old book(are the routines dated?)? Is it worth 40 bucks?

Thanks for any help, Brian
andre combrinck
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I have it and think it is worth the money.There are alot of good magic in this book.I read on this forum that some people think some of the material is dated-I just don't know why.The Jardine Ellis ring chapter stands out for me,and is worth the price of the book alone.
Andre
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bg
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I've also considered Mastering the Art of Magic by Burger. Maybe alittle more up to date?
andre combrinck
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Anything by Burger is good.But so is anything by Ganson.Think for example of The Dai Vernon Book of Magic-brilliant!
Andre
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cfleming
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Chris Fleming Long Beach, Ca.
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Do be aware that there are 2 volumes in The Art of Close-up Magic. Both are excellent and highly recomended. Smile
I don't have a solution, but I admire the problem.
eddieloughran
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I have only the second book which I bought cheap.
I quite like it but the only stuff from it I perform I have also got from other sources. A problem with Ganson, he reprints his best stuff.
I like it but haven't bought the first one, which is the best answer.
There are so many books out there.
Eddie
Scott F. Guinn
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Both volumes are excellent and have been reprinted by L&L, so are readily available. I do several routines from these books.
"Love God, laugh more, spend more time with the ones you love, play with children, do good to those in need, and eat more ice cream. There is more to life than magic tricks." - Scott F. Guinn
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bg
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I have only the second book which I bought cheap.
I quite like it but the only stuff from it I perform I have also got from other sources. A problem with Ganson, he reprints his best stuff.
I like it but haven't bought the first one, which is the best answer.
There are so many books out there.
Eddie

I was thinking that I might have other books/vids that have alot of the same material.
Brian

Although judging by the table of contents volume one is quite large.
Also Scotts endorsement has me thinking. Smile
aposjf12
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The Ganson Vol 1 of The Art of Close Up Magic was one of the first books I read on magic. It was very well written and introduced me to magic in a great way which taught me to concentrate on performance. The tricks themselves were very clever and mystifying. I remember there was a great nut and bold routine and a very good close up packed trick called VooDoo. I still haven't picked up Vol 2 yet. But Vol 1 is highly recommended.
eggshell
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I'd recommend both these books as they cover a wide range of close up magic and so there is something in there for everyone.

Lewis Ganson doesn't cover card tricks in them as he considered there was enough out there already but what he does do, in book 1 for instance, is give you about 70 - 80 effects with coins, Okito boxes,mentalism,weird stuff,paddles, ropes,sponge balls etc.

These may be old books (I bought mine in 1980) but he certainly enables you to get the best out of some close up props that may be languishing in that bottom draw.

2 specifics spring to mind that really opened my eyes when I first read these books. One was the handling of the Okito box that really taught me an immense amount on how handle the thing in a much more casual and impressive manner.

The second thing is a trick in the weird section called "The thing". In advertising lingo this would probably go as follows:

You show the spectators a totally empty handkrchief that is then folded flat on the table. Watch the spectators gasp in astonisment as slowly and visually a solid ball of "something spooky" rises up under the hanky. You prove its solid by giving it a solid rap or two with the nearest spoon or plate. The magician rolls it about under the hanky and then it "talks" in spirit talk before the magician pushes it down , through the table into the ether from which it comes. The hanky is immediately shown to be empty again.

The above trick I was performing 5 minutes after reading the book as it could be put together with everyday objects (except perhaps the talky bit)and I have never stopped doing this trick and it has never failed me yet.

I think rereading these recently it struck me how some of the handling Lewis uses has become a bit more common practice with magicians over the years and this proves how good it is. There is still a lot in there that will make even relatively experienced magicians smile e.g. "The Thing".

I think I'd sum it up by saying that these books are full of "polished" effects that any close up magician would love.
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