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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » Felix Baumgartner (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Michael Baker
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Eternal Order
Near a river in the Midwest
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I just saw this very cool video. It's worth taking a few minutes to watch. Watch it full screen.

http://io9.com/this-newly-released-foota......@bricken
~michael baker
The Magic Company
Theodore Lawton
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Inner circle
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So cool.
Bob1Dog
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Wife: It's me or this houseful of
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Pretty amazing. I don't understand how he was going so fast at mach 1, spinning wildly, on the verge of passing out, then all of a sudden, he slows down and becomes more stable. It was just a free fall, unless there were some controls he was manipulating. Still, incredible stuff.
What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about? Smile

My neighbor rang my doorbell at 2:30 a.m. this morning, can you believe that, 2:30 a.m.!? Lucky for him I was still up playing my drums.
Cliffg37
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Long Beach, CA
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I believe his suit was designed with stablizers in it. He had to be oriented the right way to make them work though. My hat is off to him.
Magic is like Science,
Both are fun if you do it right!
Daryl -the other brother
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Chicago
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Quote:
On 2014-02-01 15:22, Bob1Dog wrote:
I don't understand how he was going so fast at mach 1, spinning wildly, on the verge of passing out, then all of a sudden, he slows down and becomes more stable.

Simple answer is altitude. Recreational skydives are between 12,500 and 15,000ft. At that height the atmosphere is dense enough to cause friction which slows you down. Think of a ball bearing dropped in 30w oil, it falls slowly because of the density of the oil.

Baumgartner jumped from an altitude of 24 miles! At that height the atmosphere is very thin, meaning very little friction. Think of a ball bearing dropped in water.
The same goes for controllability. Sky divers manipulate the air around their body to control their dive (dip your left shoulder and you'll turn left). The less air you have to move, the less control you have of your fall.
rockwall
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That was really incredible.
imgic
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Moved to Seattle to see
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I got dizzy watching it. Can't comprehend actually doing it.
"Imagination is more important than knowledge."
Bob1Dog
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Quote:
On 2014-02-01 16:54, Daryl -the other brother wrote:
Quote:
On 2014-02-01 15:22, Bob1Dog wrote:
I don't understand how he was going so fast at mach 1, spinning wildly, on the verge of passing out, then all of a sudden, he slows down and becomes more stable.

Simple answer is altitude. Recreational skydives are between 12,500 and 15,000ft. At that height the atmosphere is dense enough to cause friction which slows you down. Think of a ball bearing dropped in 30w oil, it falls slowly because of the density of the oil.

Baumgartner jumped from an altitude of 24 miles! At that height the atmosphere is very thin, meaning very little friction. Think of a ball bearing dropped in water.
The same goes for controllability. Sky divers manipulate the air around their body to control their dive (dip your left shoulder and you'll turn left). The less air you have to move, the less control you have of your fall.
Thanks for that Daryl; it makes sense now!
What if the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about? Smile

My neighbor rang my doorbell at 2:30 a.m. this morning, can you believe that, 2:30 a.m.!? Lucky for him I was still up playing my drums.
S2000magician
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Yorba Linda, CA
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Quote:
On 2014-02-01 16:54, Daryl -the other brother wrote:
Think of a ball bearing dropped in 30w oil, it falls slowly because of the density of the oil.

It's not the density of the oil that slows the ball bearing; it's the viscosity. Thirty-weight oil is less dense than water, but substantially more viscous.

Broadly, though, you're correct: it's all about fluid dynamics.
Daryl -the other brother
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Thanks Bill. I think I got my point across but technically, you got me. Smile
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