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the magic mercat
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Hello all,

Needing advice on salt pours, I have never really messed with them before so I was wanting to see if
You could direct me to as many resources as you can.

What are the pros and cons of the different types of salt pours,
And what is it like using them, I have honestly never picked one up but have need of one in an act.

Thank you!
hugmagic
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Levent's Dvd gives a lot of great advice. Jeff Hobson had a good one in the Liking Ring. John Moehring did a nice one.

Different makes, Fox, Vernet, Levent, Pressly Guitar.

Ross Bertram book has a section on the salt pour.

That should give you enough to think about for awhile. Hope that helps.

Richard
Richard E. Hughes, Hughes Magic Inc., 352 N. Prospect St., Ravenna, OH 44266 (330)296-4023
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Leo H
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Richard covered all the bases fairly well. The Paul Fox salt pour gimmick is virtually impossible to locate, but there are other gimmicks. Your best bet is the Levent gimmick and DVD. You can also still locate a Kozak gimmick for a good price. I prefer popcorn salt instead of table salt.

Stevens Magic sell a salt pour gimmick that is worthy of your attention:

http://www.stevensmagic.com/shop/salt-improved-salt-pour/
the magic mercat
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Thank you so much for the help!

Any ideas on using glitter in the pour?
Oliver Ross
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I thought of using glitter instead of salt in the beginning, but the problem is that a piece of glitter is much larger than a salt grain. So the effect of producing a lot of glitter will not work as well as with salt.

My wife owns a new mixer for her kitchen. I'm going to try a to reduxe with it the size of the glitter and see if it'll work, specially the light reflexion.

Concerning the gimmicks, I like the Levent product very much. I bought the Kozak Salt Pour, but it was too large for my hands.


Oliver.
hugmagic
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You can use a blender to make popcorn salt in a pinch. Just put regular salt and bum the blender on and off a few times and it will fine chop it up.

I have the Kozak gimmick and feel it is a little too big for most guys. Great dvd and manufacture. Paul Fox gimmicks (different size) are usually made of aluminum but a decent shape. Jim Rise's gimmick is nice and holds a good load but is more shaped to your hand and stll has the nice flared lip for handling..also a good weight. Levent's gimmick is very good. It fits and works well ..allows for the handling pretty easy. I prefer the Guitar gimmick as I am used to it. It is a good sized load but the gimmick is still small enough to handle. I like the fact that it is brass and has some weight. I guess it is what one gets used to. But do not overlook Hobson or Moehring's.

Don't use glitter. Use Diamond dust. It is a craft item that is white and shimmery. Just a little mixed in with the salt add the sparkle. Of course a big part of the salt pour is your costuming, background and lighting.

Richard
Richard E. Hughes, Hughes Magic Inc., 352 N. Prospect St., Ravenna, OH 44266 (330)296-4023
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Anatole
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John Moehring's Salt Pour routine was written up (along with other routines) in his book _A Texan Trixter_. The book is out of print but it is worth a search among dealers who have a good inventory of out-of-print books. I found two copies on abebooks.com just now for $30 and $50. John's salt pour routine was a feature of his appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show. You can read a pdf description of the book by clicking on the link for it at:
http://johnmoehring.com/author.html


----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
----- Sonny Narvaez
magical expressions
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Paul Kozak has a salt pour that might be worthy of study.
Leo H
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I have heard that the Kozak gimmick is like a hand grenade: too big for small hands. Of course, Kozak is a big guy with big mitts. For the money, the best gimmick is probably the Levent design and you get his fantastic DVD which is a tutorial on the history of this effect. The Pressley Guitar gimmick is also worthy of acquisition if you can find one. The Stevens Magic gimmick is made of brass and looks interesting. Joe Porper also makes an unusual salt pour gimmick that you might want to investigate.
the magic mercat
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Thanks all!

I will probably start with the Levent DVD and go from there.

:)
Bill Hegbli
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Yes, Kozak gimmick is, but before the Paul Fox / Danny Dew gimmick was available, most used the Moehring gimmicks, and Kozak published it in the Linking Ring Magazine. Using gimmicks you can make from baby supplies found at any pharmacy store.

Magic Mercat, I suggest you do a search using the Café's search engine in this topic. You will find more then enough discussion on your question. There is no reason to repeat the same information previously given.
Amazing Magic Co
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I use and have been very happy with Kozak's gimmick. For kids shows, I use packets of sugar instead of "salt." I still use fine salt in the gimmick as I prefer the way it pours.

Dan.
Stucky
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I have used baby nose aspirators with the tip cut off, raquetballs with a slit cut in them, and even a jumbo TT. The biggest thing is find a way to make it entertaining because salt pour for a modern audience is inherently boring.
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funsway
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I have use a sugar bowl and spooned out a teaspoon full to vanish and the reproduce in a "pour." But actually use salt since sugar becomes sticky. Conceptually sugar can be more magical than salt - not sure why. Certainly, opening a packet of sugar for a controlled amount can make more sense that opening many salt packets or dumping out a shaker out of place at the setting.

The Vernet gimmick works fine for some effects.
"the more one pretends at magic, the more awe and wonder will be found in real life." Arnold Furst



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Pete Biro
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Levent's is the current best. The Porper gimmick, created with R. Paul Wilson is, in fact, a second load gimmick. you cannot pour into it for the vanish. However it has a two way release that you can turn on and off and have pour out of hand in two directions (by turning hand over). It is really clever, well made and what I call a perfect second load. Or you vanish the salt, then create the pour.

While you are at it, search YouTube for Fred Kaps' routine. It is not boring.
STAY TOONED... @ www.pete-biro.com
Anatole
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Bill gives some good advice when he suggested that the original poster "do a search using the Café's search engine in this topic."

However, I disagree that "There is no reason to repeat the same information previously given." For one thing, someone who responds to mercat's new request here may be able to provide information that was not covered in previous posts elsewhere or elsewhen. For example, I just took a look at this Café thread on the Salt Pour
http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......rum=8&13
and I did not see any mention there of the Salt Pour that John Moehring featured in his act on the Ed Sullivan show. So if the OP had not asked here about the Salt Pour, he would likely not have seen the comment I made about the Moehring book and the links I posted to used copies available on the Net.

Educators repeat information as a matter of course. Just because you read _Hamlet_ or _Macbeth_ in your 12th grade English class does not mean that you won't learn something new if you read those classics in a college level course or go to a lecture presented at the Folger Shakespeare Library or your local college/university.

When I was in grade school, there was an attitude that students should not ask their teachers things that they could look up themselves. There is, however, a concept in education known as "the teachable moment"--an opportunity to provide information that can affect a student's motivation to learn something. Some people may call that "spoon feeding." I call it nurturing and being helpful.

If there is really "no reason to repeat information previously given" there would be no reason to publish new beginners' books on magic every so often. Henry Hay wrote more than one beginners' book on magic. _The Amateur Magician's Handbook_ repeated much of the information from his earlier book _Learn Magic_. I for one am glad he did.

When Levent and Todd Karr wrote _Roy Benson by Starlight_ they could have decided to mention Benson's lecture notes _Benson on Magic_ as a footnote or bibliography item suggesting that readers look for a copy at some used magic dealer. Or they could have rewritten the information in their own words. But they chose instead to include the lecture notes verbatim in their entirety complete with the original illustrations by Connye Benson on pages 664-681 of their book.

Most of us have benefited at one time or another from being able to turn to a mentor who could answer a question or provide a tip at a critical moment in our on-going education as a magician. A working pro asked me a few months ago for some tips on his billiard ball act. I could have handed him a list of books, but we got together for lunch at a local restaurant and I brought my Fakini billiard balls along and showed him some moves. I was pleased to see him post his live performance at a nite club here in Virginia on youtube and that he included the interlock ball production that I taught him.

And BTW, in addition to providing "live instruction" to my friend, I did provide a list of books that had good chapters on billiard ball manipulation, ranging from _Routined Manipulations, Part II_ to Maurice Rooklyn's _Spherical Sorcery and Recollections of a Pro).

----- Sonny
----- Sonny Narvaez
Bill Hegbli
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Sonny, I don't know what words you used, but I simply posted Fred Kaps Salt Pour and Salt Pour and over 39 pages of references came up. I guess you forgot that you even posted in many of the topics. Levent's post even came up. When going outside and leave the topic empty. Yes, everything has been said before. The reason I posted the above is because members not answering the question, they just started listing the people and props that have all been discussed in more detail then what is said here.

Here you go Sonny:
http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/searc......=7549287

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/searc......=7585623

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/searc......=7784641

----------------------------------------

The major con to the salt pour is the use of salt. It will eat many surfaces, thus it should flow onto a cloth that can be picked up or into a container. I am sure you do not want to refinish a floor just because of a little salt.

The pros are that it get a good round of applause.
Anatole
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Of all the classic effects in magic, the salt pour is one I've always had trouble understanding as to why it was so popular among magicians. The visibility from a stage is not really that good unless you take care to hold your hand in front of the dark fabric of whatever you are wearing--or if you're on TV when the camera can zoom in on the salt pouring from the fist.

The salt on the stage can also be dangerous. Performers (magic acts and non-magic acts--especially dancers) that follow a salt pour act could easily slip on the granules of sodium chloride. Salt is more dangerous, I suspect, than the confetti that is currently the rage among magic acts. But maybe the suggestion that some people have made of spreading a painter's drop cloth on the floor before a confetti or salt pour act would be one way to minimize the chance of an accident. Or maybe people who do a salt pour effect could bring a mini vacuum cleaner with them when they perform.

I did think Vernet's Ethereal Salt
http://tinyurl.com/ksmbtux
was a clever gimmicked salt shaker. I considered using it and telling people that the contents was woofle dust, not salt.

Granted, I sometimes leave a few playing cards on the stage floor after my manipulation act--or out among the theater seats when I did card scaling. But sometimes the kids at a public show can gather some of them up as souvenirs the way Thurston's Throwing Cards became souvenirs in his act. I would imagine that some kids from the 60's and 70's have kept those cards I scaled out and laminated them so they can display them on a fireplace mantel and tell their grandchildren and curious visitors about the time they saw The Great Narvaez (he said with his tongue stuck firmly on the inside of his cheek).

----- Sonny
----- Sonny Narvaez
Leo H
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Quote:
On 2014-02-09 06:27, Stucky wrote:
The biggest thing is find a way to make it entertaining because salt pour for a modern audience is inherently boring.


Much of magic is inherently boring. It is the responsibility of the magician to make any effect entertaining. Kaps created humor and tension by appearing worried that the pour would never stop. He kept striking up the band for one more round of music to accompany the pour. He found a way to make it entertaining.
funsway
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Quote:
On 2014-02-09 23:34, Leo H wrote:
Quote:
On 2014-02-09 06:27, Stucky wrote:
The biggest thing is find a way to make it entertaining because salt pour for a modern audience is inherently boring.


Much of magic is inherently boring.


Wow! Once might have an accidental slip of thought. Twice is too much astonishment for me.

In 60 years with performing magic I have never been bored with any magic effect, nor sensed that my audience was ever bored.

Performance magic is a form of communication. If they were bored it was with me -- never the magic.

Put another way. If you think it is boring it might be. If you think it is exciting, enchanting, mesmerizing, astonishing, etc it will be.

What are you doing to communicate the boredom?

Also, since "magic" is the label placed on inexplicable phenomenon that astonish and risk the "4 F's" ay the Limbic level, it cannot be "boring" by definition. If it is boring it ain't magic!

......................................

now, I might consider that some repetitious moves might risk boredom, just as they risk a "reveal." That is a matter of routining. How do you play with Anticipation and Astonishment/Surprise to built to a climax?

Alternately, you might choose to appear bored for humor -- only to have magic save you from the doldrums.

Wow!
"the more one pretends at magic, the more awe and wonder will be found in real life." Arnold Furst



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