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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Ever so sleightly » » Sponge balls vs. lemons (for the Cups and Balls) (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Darck Ninja
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I purchased Carl Andrews Cups and Balls Smile quite a while ago, and I began to understand there was a big controversy on whether to use Sponge Balls or Lemons as a final load for the Cups and Balls. Smile
Through my studies, I have found the best reactions come from mixing it up. For instance: I would use two Small RED Sponge-Balls, and one Lemon for the final load. I find it is easiest to get triple-climaxes this way. The first two small sponge-balls completely destroy their defenses and the lemon just brings 'em home!
These are my thoughts on the matter.

One more thing, I don't have a problem with using the traditional three cups instead of two, but it dampens the climax to have the same thing come out of all three cups. Explore this.

Sorry, I spoke too soon. I have more. If you work in a tropical climate, or cant wear attire that will cover a lemon, use two small (1"-1 1/2") red sponge balls, and then make the final load a large (2 1/2"- 3". Whatever completely fills the mouth of your cup) yellow sponge ball
I believe it is imperative that you come out with different objects, or at least different colored sponge-balls.
Try this stuff out. You'll soon begin to understand what I mean.

Magically,

Smile Smile The Darck One Smile Smile
"The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science. He who does not know it and can no longer wonder, is as good as dead, and his eyes are dimmed." Einstein
Pete Biro
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It doesn't matter at all what you use as long as it gets the reaction you want.

It is the CHANGE not SIZE that really matters. Smile
STAY TOONED... @ www.pete-biro.com
kihei kid
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Once again I agree with Pete. The change is completely unexpected in the routine.
In loving memory of Hughie Thomasson 1952-2007.

You brought something beautiful to this world, you touched my heart, my soul and my life. You will be greatly missed.

Until we meet again “my old friend”.
PaulGreen
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Pete is quoting the thoughts and actions of our mutual mentor, Ken Brooke!

Regards,

Paul Green
Rob Johnston
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I have never thought of switching it up with different items. Thanks. I can see how that change is the only thing that really matters.
"Genius is another word for magic, and the whole point of magic is that it is inexplicable." - Margot Fonteyn
Bill Palmer
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The main thing with the final loads is that they should be surprising and unusual.

A lemon or a lime is good. A potato is good. A frog is good. Baby chicks are good.

A spectator's watch is good.

Bob Read's Penultimate Cups and Balls routine has some great ideas in it.
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
Frank Tougas
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Size of the final loads, types, colors and number of them are not as relevant as how they fit into the cadence of your routine. As Mr. Biro says, it is the surprise of the change that makes the finish. I personally use giant knit balls that match the small balls.

All of the above could lead to a smash finish, or all could fall flat depending on the personality of the performer, the character, the flow of the routine and how it all melds into your close-up act.

I prefer to think of the final loads as the demarcation between the body of the routine and the finish. Not only should it produce an astonishing surprise for your audience, but it needs to act as a definite signal to them that your routine is done and thereby acts as an applause cue.

If you are happy with your routine and are getting the reaction you both want and expect - don't sweat the controversy. A person can make anything controversial, making it magic is quite a different matter.
Frank Tougas The Twin Cities Most "Kid Experienced" Children's Performer :"Creating Positive Memories...One Smile at a Time"
Larry Barnowsky
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I personally would not use sponge balls for a final load. I want the audience to know by sight and sound that these objects are heavy and solid.
RobertBloor
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Pete is right! sheesh am I being repetitively redundant?

I wouldn't use sponge balls for the final loads ever.

Why?
Because a sponge ball can squish up.

It would be easy for an audience member to think, "Oh they were jammed in the cups and then let out."

When I'm done with the cups and balls 99% of the time, audience members come forward and some pick up my balls (ha!) baseballs that is. They pick them up for one reason...to make sure they're real.

Just like Larry said...the real heavy loads are critical.

Most people can't figure out how something so "big" and "heavy" can fit in those cups.

And thus, the long winded response to your post draws to a close.

Robert Bloor
"That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government,"
-The Declaration of Independence
Whit Haydn
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I'm with you on this one, Robert. The final loads should not only seem to be impossible to have been in the cups during the routine, but best seem as if they are too big, solid, and heavy to have been anywhere on the performer's person.

I remember when I was young, one of my teachers, Dick Snavely of Raleigh, NC would use children's balls, made of natural rubber, with a painted surface. To accent the solidity of the balls, he would cut a tiny chunk out of the surface so that the natural rubber could be seen. It looked like the ball had been "nicked" on the concrete or something, but the nature and weight of the ball was communicated instantly.
KingStardog
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Quote:
On 2004-01-13 17:13, Bill Palmer wrote:
The main thing with the final loads is that they should be surprising and unusual.


There are replica shrunken heads available made from goat skin that look very real. So real in fact that most folks won't even handle them. Of course you will need to work the handling so they are pointed in the right direction.
...think not that all wisdom is in your school. You may have studied other paths,but, it is important to remember that no matter who you are or where you come from, there is always more to learn.
Harry Murphy
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I wouldn’t worry about the head’s orientation. Rather, load it and then give it a little flick as you uncover it so that it rolls toward the audience getting the proper reaction! Smile

Check out:
http://www.shrunken-head.com/
These are great and the same ones sold elsewhere on the net for $50.00 each!

OK, OK, I know, I know, I have too much idle time on my hands!

I think we are at risk of getting off topic!

Smile
The artist formally known as Mumblepeas!
KingStardog
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I might be retailing them 3/$49.95 if my samples look good and are uniform. A reveal they won't soon forget.
...think not that all wisdom is in your school. You may have studied other paths,but, it is important to remember that no matter who you are or where you come from, there is always more to learn.
Harry Murphy
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King, you going for the 10 for $100 deal? If so I'll buy three from you! Mixed colors of course! Smile
The artist formally known as Mumblepeas!
KingStardog
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I'm getting samples first. There are about five grades of each size, going from 'looks like a dog toy all the way to museum quality. My neighbor had some real ones that his dad brought back from Equador in the 50s and he had several goat ones to make a collection of sorts.

Each one has a different face so most of the 10 lots have less desirable faces in them. The realy poor ones hit ebay from time to time. There is only one site that lets you pick the exact ones that you want to buy and they are a bit expensive.

I wont know how good they are till I see them up close. I'm kind of scared of the quality on 10/$100.
...think not that all wisdom is in your school. You may have studied other paths,but, it is important to remember that no matter who you are or where you come from, there is always more to learn.
jlevey
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I believe it was Michael Ammar that recommended using fruits as a final load, in order to be "incongruent" with the previous balls. It packs a greater punch than making the mini-baseballs transform into larger ones.

For years I have used one large load for the grand finale...a lemon. It's shape and color are very visual,memorable and as Robert and Whit suggest, it has real weight. But potatoes, onions, a giant dice, a frog can all be used to great effect (the frog is especially suited to table-hopping!).

Just prior to lifting the final cup, to present the final load, I often lift the cup with great build up to reveal "nothing"! The final load is there, inside the cup, but I retain the load with my pinky finger. I hold the cup mouth down, in a suspended position just a few inches from the top of my mat, long enough to let it "sink in", that the magic didn't work. I then place the cup back down on the mat and hand my wand to one of the spectators and encourage him/her to wave the wand towards the cup . When the cup is lifted I encourage the group to applaud the spectator who waved the wand and made the magic happen. I have a wonderful time with this sequence and so does my audience.

I'm not sure of the source from which I "picked up" this retention hold for the cups and balls, possibly Vernon, or Ammar. If anyone recalls where this move was first published, please let me know.

To read and/or contribute to an interesting discussion on performing cups and balls silently, please visit: http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......orum=115

All the best! Smile
Jonathan
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Frank Tougas
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Max,I am not sure where it was first published either, but I don't think it is important as anyone who has ever loaded a cup has independently invented the move. So don't be so hard on yourself my friend, not everything has to be credited to a source.

As a point of fact, Don Alan used the ol' pinky to retain the load years back when he used to toss the load up into the approproiate spot while continuing upward with his hand to do something else.

While never really explained in his seminal routine (which sold originally for the astonishing price of 50 cents!) It was however demonstrated in the Steven's tape - done years later.

I think letting the spectator do the final magic is wonderful and is the kind of final touch that makes a routine. I do much the same with the final ace of spades when I do Twisting the Aces. After two failed attempts to get the Ace of Spades to turn over I hand the pack to the spectator, have he/she do the twist and then count off the cards onto the table. Volia! Instant magician, great surprise and a sure applause cue.
Frank Tougas The Twin Cities Most "Kid Experienced" Children's Performer :"Creating Positive Memories...One Smile at a Time"
jlevey
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Great comments and info Frank.

Thanks.
Jonathan
Max & Maxine Entertainment
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cigar808
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For my final load, I have started using three hacky saks. You know, those little knitted foot bags that kids kick around.
Perfect size, brightly colored, and they don't' spoil.
And great for juggling too!
Jonathan Townsend
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Who suggested using sponge balls as final loads in the cups routine?

There are a couple of good routines that use smaller sponge balls as the working set for the routine, the Kaps routine for example, though for final loads it helps to have something a bit more solid and less expected.
...to all the coins I've dropped here
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