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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » New and in search of advice and guidance (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

uzilini
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3 Posts

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Okay, this is the thing...I've always goofed around with a few magic tricks all through my life, picking up new ones as I go through books and videos. As a matter of fact, I have Larry Anderson's jaw droppers, if anybody's heard of that. I really want to start getting more serious about magic, but I don't know where to start. Just by reading through the threads here, it seems like everybody is so much more advanced, that it's a bit overwhelming. I notice that many people are good at one thing or another (ie: coin tricks, card tricks) but I don't know where to start. When I perform any magic, I picture myself performing at restaraunts, bars or in my sales presentations (Ii deal real estate), so I would appreciate any sort of suggestions as to what you think I should focus on. I would eventually like to know a bit of everything, but I'm sure we all would. Please let me know what any of you think. I just need a little guidance.
diplomacy is the art of letting someone have your way

-fortune cookie-
ByranNewell
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Huntington Beach, CA
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The first book that really taught me magic was Henry Hay's "The Amateur Magician's Handbook". It teaches sleights with cards, coins, ropes, etc., and is catered to new magicians, although not dumbed-down, if that makes sense. I would suggest starting there to see which avenue you would like to explore more- be it coins, cards, parlor, etc.

There's no rush to become experienced in a hurry- you should enjoy it. Videos are fine and dandy, as are DVD's- they have their place, but as far as learning about magic- the psychology, the attitude, and descriptions of sleights- you can't beat a book. Get a book that teaches MANY avenues such as the one I mentioned above, and see what you like. Good luck!
what
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Lehi, UT, USA
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Welcome to the ranks of newbies.
The secret to progressing is to not buy too many materials. Start with a good general book. Build a show and perform it to a friendly audience (family, friends, etc). I find myself buying too many materials and getting myself bogged down in info-glut. Then I put them in a box, choose 1 and continue to progress.

I recommend "Mark Wilsons Complete Course in Magic" as a place to start. There is enough material to put together some great shows. Others will have their favorites.
Magic is fun!!!
Dan Magyari
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San Francisco, CA
173 Posts

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You already have enough stuff - I can tell by the way you're talking about what you've done and what you have. You only need one more thing, Ken Weber's new book "Maximum Entertainment." Sshh - don't tell anyone - I'm trying to keep it a secret. Anyone who reads this book and responds to it - will have way more to offer than 90% of us "magicians" out there right now. Did I already say, "Don't tell anyone - it's a secret."? Good luck.
Everything you do -- everything -- has your signature on it. Regardless of whether you intend it that way or not. And that's how people perceive you.-George Ledo
Peter Marucci
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Any good, basic, all-round book is your best route.
Some have been suggested here and I concur; but let me add one of my own: Harry Lorayne's The Magic Book.
This was originally written for the lay public and it assumes NOTHING!
He starts of by describing what a deck of cards is and how to shuffle it. Not false shuffles or fancy flourishes; just simple, ordinary, everyday overhand shuffles. (You'd be surprised at the number of people who can't shuffle a deck of cards).
The book consits of magic with cards, coins, rubber bands, paper clips, pencils, paper -- not a magic "prop" in the whole book (except, possibly, a deck of cards)!
He confines it to stuff that everyone will find around the house or office.
This, or one of the others, should give you some sort of guidance, or at least a taste of the broad panorama of magic.
And don't forget your public library; that's where I started. The magic section, in adults' and juveniles', is 793.8 in the Dewey decimal system (which EVERY library uses). You will be amazed at the material you can find sitting out on the shelves! And, if you are an adult, please don't overlook the kids' section; it's often the better of the two.

Finally (and I bet you thought I'd never end! LOL!), don't worry about lack of experience or what appears to be experience in others.

Remember: Nobody was born knowing this stuff.

The best in the business, past and present, were all at your stage at one time.

So don't be disheartened. You've found a wonderful pastime, business career, or whatever you want to make of it.

cheers,
Peter Marucci
Aus
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Australia
950 Posts

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Here mate try this:

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......forum=41

Magically

Aus
J773
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Belgium
56 Posts

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Don't worry about being new.
I am new myself and had to find a little guidance. This board is excellent, when you need advice and some tips. If you read through the posts, you will find a lot of posts for beginners ranging from coins to cards to whatever.

Maybe at first, you should try a little of everything, and then go on with the discipline you feel most comfortable with. I myself love cards and card tricks. So asking for advice around here, I finally bought 'royal road to card magic'. A great book to start with and not too expensive.
Personally I prefer a little more visual aid, but the book is still a great starter.

So, don't worry ... everybody started somewhere.
uzilini
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Thanks, everybody for your comments and advice. I'll be sure to check out some (if not all) of the books reccommended. not sure which avenue I take as far as picking a specialty, but I'm sure I'll figure it out. once again, I really appreciate all the advice.
diplomacy is the art of letting someone have your way

-fortune cookie-
bg
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Indy
313 Posts

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The Jawdroppers vids are a great start and in fact alot of the material in them is right out of some of the resources listed above.

There's enough material on those vids to keep you busy for a long while. So I would use the vids and buy other books and vid that interest you. Just make sure to check with the Café' before you buy so you know you're getting something of an appropriate skill level.

Most of all learn and buy things in magic that interest you and you're likely to stick with it and be good at it.

Brian
ashah
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If there's one thing I can't emphasize enough, it's this: pick a thing or two to learn, and DON'T move on to other stuff before you've got that down. I always want to try new sleights and effects before perfecting any. Not a good approach. Better to have one thing perfected than a hundred things not perfected.
Paddy
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Milford OH
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Uzilini, EVERY ONE of us was in exactly you spot at one time in our lives. We had started to learn and found out we loved magic. The area you choose is determined only by you. You will be drawn to something for some unknown reason, but it is because that is the type of magic that your best at. Just enjoy it.

I started with cards and gimmicks, I am now going thru Bobo's coin book, chapter by chapter, relearning basics and newly learning other effects. I dropped coin magic because my hands would hurt after practicing for even a half hour. But now I am drawn back to it and my restaurant gigs are liking my new routines.

Just rememeber, the whole purpose of magic is to enjoy life. Don't add pressure, just relax and enjoy entertaining.

Peter
Non Impediti Ratione Cogitationis

I reject your reality & substitute my own

http://www.Scho-Lan.com
Brian D
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When I started out, the only book I had for the first year and a half was Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic. Fifteen years later I still use several of the routines in the book in my walk around performing (sponge balls, cups and balls, etc.) This book is well worth it. Smile
uzilini
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You guys are great. thank you very much for all the advice. ashah, thank you for the reminder. I do get into the bad habit of trying to learn as many tricks as possible before I got one down to a tee. it's also reassuring to hear you guys say thatt you've all been in my shoes at one time. thanks again everybody and know that your suggestions are very appreciated.
diplomacy is the art of letting someone have your way

-fortune cookie-
oldmanxxvi
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North Carolina
61 Posts

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First and foremost DO NOT BUY ANY MORE TRICKS! Stay away from your local magic shop. Find a book (and there have been many great suggestions here), work on the tricks you already have (one at a time), and perfect them. Remember that doing tricks is one thing, but doing magic is quite another. The effect that you think is the simplest, when properly presented, will blow the minds of your audience.

I cannot say this enough, being a magician does not mean that you have every brand new trick that comes on the market. You are a magician when you believe that you are, no matter what is in your collection.

Josh
gerrardlo
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Manchester
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Uzilini,
I have only been doing magic for a couple of months and am quite new to it all. My bible has been The Royal Road to Card Magic which is fantastic! I would strongly advice this as it is also cheap!
Necromance
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Pattingham, UK
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Uzilini,
That was the same with me. I had been playing around with magic since I was about 6 or 7. About a year ago I became completely absorbed and enthralled by magic and had to learn everything and master the skills. I totally agree with Gerrardlo in that Royal Road is amazing! Any sleight or trick of the hand it covers. Some areas are tedious and require patience but it is well worth every second that you read and practise with.
Good Luck
Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic-Arthur C. Clarke
Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced-probably NOT Arthur C. Clarke
Chad C.
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I'll second Brian D., I only had Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic for a number of months and came up with my entire show just from that book. I still also do a number of the effects in the book. It covers so many things and the illustrations cannot be beat. My first show...The Wilson Book, a tt, and some silks...ah, the memories.

Enjoy yourself and have fun!
Necromance
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Pattingham, UK
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I have Mark Wilson's "Cyclopeida to Magic" and that is excellent. Covers Everything. Is that the same one? If so, I strongly agree with both Brian D. and Chad C.
Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic-Arthur C. Clarke
Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced-probably NOT Arthur C. Clarke
Liams-Heart
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Quote:
On 2004-02-12 08:11, Chad C. wrote:
I'll second Brian D., I only had Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic for a number of months and came up with my entire show just from that book. I still also do a number of the effects in the book. It covers so many things and the illustrations cannot be beat. My first show...The Wilson Book, a tt, and some silks...ah, the memories.

Enjoy yourself and have fun!


I've had this book for about 6 months and haven't gotten around to reading much. After seeing all of these posts I'm going to bust it out tomorrow!
Tony Ley
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Orlando, FLorida
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Uzillini -
I just wanted to add an OUTSTANDINGLY AMAZING source of info (man do I love the 'caps lock' key or what).
If you picture yourself performing in bars, restaurants, or during your sales presentations go to the ULTIMATE source for information on those venues.
Check out Jim Sisti's Magic Menu. The first 10 year (!) have been collected into two volumes so far and the publication is STILL going on strong! Actually the guest to the Café this month (Simon Lovell - the magicial lemming), is a HUGE contributor to Mr. Sisti's publication.
Oh, just what the heck IS this Magic Menu? It's THE trade journal for ANY magician who works bars, restaurants, hospitality, tradeshows, etc,. Columns are written by magicians who are actually working in the types of environments you're envisioning. Every issue includes Jim's extremely honest, dead-on reviews of new effects, tips on handling your magic business, effects, and theory. The Magic Menu will really get you thinking about magic from not only a business sense, but help you see magic and magicians through the public's eyes as well.
Take care and I hope this helps.
Tony Ley
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