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Malakim
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Hello,
I noticed that in the field of Magic a lot of DVDs can be bought and are recomended here. I just read the two cups and balls threads and
basically a lot of DVDs should have all the information.
Now, I am more of a book type. I like to have Books around and I have my own style to work with books.
I am new to Magic and wonder if I now need to start using DVDs to educate me or are books just as well or better?
Magic Oli
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Personally I prefer dvds as they give you a model that you can work towards. You get to see things from all angles and see things performed in person which gives a good representation of what you should be doing and what you shouldn't be doing
Terrible Wizard
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A lot probably depends upon personal learning styles - some are more visual/ auditory, others linguistic and verbal.

IMHO, the combination is best. I try and use both books and DVDs as each has advantages/disadvantages. I seem to learn more moves more easily from DVDs, and I like to see a trick performed to get a handle on it, but books can be useful in highlighting small technical details and explaining performance, patter and delivery better.

I guess neither is as good as a mentor, though ...
Malakim
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Thank you for the answers.
The last answer sounds like a good way to see this.

Well, I will try to start with books then and maybe will add a DVD or two where I need clarification.
Terrible Wizard
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Sounds like a good plan to me, Malakim Smile Just make sure you get the best resources you can afford - there's many great magic books and DVDs that people will recommend on the café. Go for the really good stuff.
Malakim
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I have not bought books or DVDs up to now because I have not even mastered any of the skills which are easy to get by (youtube or elsewhere).
Also I still need to decide where I want to go, I want to learn one of the classics, but will it be chop cup, cups and balls, just cards or coins or okito box I have still to decide.
wwhokie1
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Quote:
On Nov 3, 2014, Terrible Wizard wrote:
A lot probably depends upon personal learning styles - some are more visual/ auditory, others linguistic and verbal.


Good teachers realize that people learn in different ways. Yes, some people are visual learners and will find dvds to provide something they need that books cannot provide. These people have a hard time learning in a traditional classroom environment, or simply by reading. But the problem is that many people choose dvds simply because we are a screen oriented society. Watching a screen is a passive activity and you cannot learn magic by being passive. Books are fantastic and can give more information than a dvd, which is why movies leave out so much of the material that was in the novel. Whichever you choose, books or dvds or both, don't be a passive observer or passive reader. Read slowly, or watch slowly and do what you are learning. You don't develop a skill by watching someone else do it. The biggest problem with a dvd is that it encourages us to sit passively and watch. You can get through a dvd in an hour, a book requires you to take more time and go through it slowly. Advantages and disadvantages to each.
Terrible Wizard
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I agree with being an active reader/watcher/listener. Very important. And multiple readings/ viewings. We're talking study methods, not entertainment.
Terrible Wizard
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Regarding what you should learn first, Malakim, I can only offer my own very limited experience - your mileage may vary, and others more experienced than I may give sounder advice. But, for what it's worth ...

a) I'm the kind of person who can sometimes hit a roadblock or reach a boredom threshold quickly. Because of this I like having two 'areas' to work on - switching from one to the other when I get stuck, or frustrated, or just bored. More than two would be spreading ones focus too thin, but I think most can handle two areas together - like cards and cups, or rope and coins. Note, though, that within those areas it is best to focus on one 'move' and 'trick' at a time, to build up one solid 'routine' at a time. Easier said than done.

b) I've heard that some sleight of hand is easier than others. From what I've experienced and heard, paddle work, sponge balls and rope are generally easier to build dexterity and confidence with than coins and the cups and balls. I find coins very hard, whereas a paddle, sponge balls and rope is comparatively easier. They are also cheaper. However, it is probably best to go with where your passion leads you Smile

c) Certain 'props', like cards and coins, have the advantage of being easily accessible and affording plenty of opportunities to practice - whereas cups and balls often require more time, space and a table. One can shuffle cards on a bus, or in public. Hard to practice cups and balls so easily.
55Hudson
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Malakim,

I would like to make two points that I believe are very important:

1) you mention that you haven't purchased books or DVDs because you are still learning "skills which are easy to get..."). This is faulty logic. You want a sound foundation to build your magic skills on. Many YouTube teaching videos are not great and have serious flaws in the technique. The real masters of magic do this for a living and sell their expertise through books and DVDs. They don't give them away for free on YouTube. Learn correct technique at the beginning of your journey and you won't regret it.

One of those techniques is the basic vanish. I'm a big fan of Al Schneider's basic vanish, taught on his DVD, The Al Schneider Technique, vol 1. I don't know where else you can find this in print or video, although Tyler Erickson (www.StrongerMagic.com) teaches his variation of this vanish as a fundamental technique - I highly recommend Tyler for Skype or in person classes.

2) books have a couple of advantages over video. First you get more for your money. There is way more information packed into (a good) book than you will ever find in a DVD. (See wwhokie point above). Also, with video you risk imitating mannerisms, voice inflection, and expressions that may not suit your style. Often you will see magicians perform and each routine seems to be a different person performing - because they've imitated different video presentations from different magic instructors. With books you develop your own voice and style. Keep that in mind - very important to have your own style - don't be a copy of a great magician. Be a great magician in your own right.

Hudson
george1953
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When I started there were no DVDs or videos so we all had to learn from books. I still prefer books but that's probably because that's what I am used to. I must admit, some moves are easier to learn by watching. Some moves are difficult to describe adequately in words.
By failing to prepare, we are preparing to fail.
Malakim
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I hope the last point (of beeing a copy of some DVD) will not be a problem (for me).
The idea for me is to use my personality quirks and weave magick into it. One of these quirks is story telling (I travel a lot and have lots to tell), one other is collecting things of quality. that's where I started to add tricks for my kids and to develop a little "show" for birthdays.
Now I want to really learn the trait.

Well thank you for the hint that the better techniques are found only in books and professional DVDs. As soon as I have decided where to go I will get the literature to learn the correct thing Smile
Invisticone
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I am by no means an accomplished magician, but my experience learning sleight of hand with cards, coins and rings has led me to the conclusion that there are good and bad books and videos. Even the odd good explanation on youtube, though people are right to have warned you. Watching as many different versions of the same sleight has also been of invaluable help in many cases. Sometimes somthing just "clicked" on watching the 5fth different person doing something, on ocasion watching somebody doing it badly (on youtube) and going "Aha! That's what I'm doing wrong!"
wwhokie1
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Quote:
On Nov 3, 2014, george1953 wrote:
When I started there were no DVDs or videos so we all had to learn from books. I still prefer books but that's probably because that's what I am used to. I must admit, some moves are easier to learn by watching. Some moves are difficult to describe adequately in words.


That is the problem I have with books, sometimes after reading and looking at the drawings, I still have questions and the answers just aren't there. A video, sometimes, makes it possible to slow it down or pause it and find the answer. Of course a live person and you can just ask. I have one book, "The Card Magic of LePaul" which uses actual photos of hands holding cards. I found that to be far superior to drawings.
Harry Lorayne
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I guess you haven't read any of the book I wrote JUST FOR YOU!!!! Really.
[email]harrylorayne@earthlink.net[/email]

http://www.harrylorayne.com
http://www.harryloraynemagic.com
wwhokie1
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"Just for me", wow, I will have to check that out. Seriously, it does sound interesting.
Harry Lorayne
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Amazing!!!!
[email]harrylorayne@earthlink.net[/email]

http://www.harrylorayne.com
http://www.harryloraynemagic.com
Thorn
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Personally, I prefer DVDs. I'm more of a visual learner and DVDs allows me to pause, stop, or rewind miscommunication in the instructions explained and focus on hand on other qualities. I feel the biggest pro to books are that they allow way more creative aspects to your magic. You imagine ideas and presentations to help illustrate the words you have read.
Malakim
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@Mr. Lorayne
which one of your books shall be the best to get started?
Which classic magic routine should a beginner learn with your books?
Harry Lorayne
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Any one of them.
All of them.
Unfortunately, many are out of print - can't do "storage" any more. You can go to harryloraynemagic.com to see what's currently available. And, if you want to see some impromptu card routines, go to www.youtube.com/harrylorayneonvideo . (Hope I have that link right.) HL.
[email]harrylorayne@earthlink.net[/email]

http://www.harrylorayne.com
http://www.harryloraynemagic.com
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