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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Magical equations » » I just saved you $10,000 (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Rob Johnston
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Utah
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This guy and Steve Fearson should get together!
"Genius is another word for magic, and the whole point of magic is that it is inexplicable." - Margot Fonteyn
LobowolfXXX
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La Famiglia
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I think it would be worth millions if the spectator's could pick any starting square and any ending square. Starting and ending on a black square would be particularly challenging.
"Torture doesn't work" lol
Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

"...as we reason and love, we are able to hope. And hope enables us to resist those things that would enslave us."
balducci
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Quote:
On 2004-03-09 15:34, matthu wrote:
I suppose the big question is: how much would any member of the audience be prepared to pay to witness somebody doing this amazing feat?

Somebody tell me this is a wind-up! I've been a pretty serious chess player at one stage, but I think that would even bore the pants off me. A LOT of people don't even understand how to play chess ...


Apparently, chess is popular and cool again. So this may be the perfect time to act this routine to one's act Smile

---

Chess: the New Rook'n'roll?

Madonna's influence has helped the game become cool.

By Guardian Newspapers, 11/19/2004

"Chess is the game which reflects most honour on human wit" - Voltaire.

Chess has had an image problem. It conjures up thoughts of bespectacled men in anoraks hunched over boards in the upstairs rooms of grotty pubs, or spotty, gangly schoolboys who can't get a girlfriend and make do with the Sicilian Defence (Winawer variation).

"Dysfunctionality" is the word that springs to mind. As former British champion Bill Hartston said: "Chess is not something that drives people mad; it is something that keeps mad people sane." The board's 64 squares are so much less challenging than life.

Chess was not something you could admit a passion for - until now. For Tesco has announced that sales of chess sets are booming and that its new own-brand set is selling at double the rate forecast. It attributes the sales spurt to the fact that celebrities such as Madonna play, and makes a startling claim: chess is trendy.

"Chess, of all the really traditional board games, has undergone an image transformation," said Karen Harris, Tesco's senior buying manager. "Being able to play chess is fast becoming a very cool skill for young people." At last, we chess lovers can out ourselves.

"The celebrity factor is important," said Gerry Walsh, president of the British Chess Federation. "They are role models for the young and encourage them to take up the game. When chess was featured in the first Harry Potter film, we noticed a sudden upsurge in interest."

Madonna and her husband, Guy Ritchie, who have taken chess lessons from former Scottish champion Alan Norris, are the best-known celebrities. But a surprising number of famous names enjoy the game: former world heavyweight boxing champion Lennox Lewis; Andrew Flintoff, the superstar of English cricket, who used to play chess for Lancashire; former snooker world champion Steve Davis; and pop stars Bono, Moby and Sting.

British chess has, however, yet to unearth anyone to rival the Norwegian Simen Agdestein, who is both a chess grandmaster and played football for Norway. If only Wayne Rooney knew the intricacies of the Modern Benoni. "Anything that can get us away from this nerdy image of chess has got to be good," said John Saunders, editor of the British Chess Magazine. "That image has never been true in countries outside the UK and US. In Russia and much of Europe, it's a mainstream sport."

Here, the government has refused to put chess on its list of recognised sports (a move that would have tax advantages). Walsh said his priority was to convince the government to change its mind. The artist and chess obsessive Marcel Duchamp had no doubts. "Chess is a sport, a violent sport," he insisted. "If it's anything at all, it's a fight."

Saunders believes that in the UK the nerdy stereotype dates from the immediate post-war period, when chess was a middle-class, grammar school activity. "If you flick through back copies of the British Chess Magazine from the 1940s and 1950s," he said, "you see an endless succession of elderly men in horn-rimmed spectacles and tweed jackets."

Chess is now played well beyond the confines of grammar schools. According to Walsh, there has been a huge increase in the number of primary-school pupils playing - up to a hundred in every school. Last year's British Land UK Chess Challenge, a nationwide knockout competition for pupils of all ages, attracted 71,000 entries.

Story continues here ...

http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/11-19-2......ewPage=2
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Laban
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By now I figured you all talking about some kind of Chessboard equation that will allow you do perform something that will seem magical.
It seems real interesting and I will learn more about it.
But I still can't see what's so special about Landmarks offer?
And how come he really believe that someone will pay $10,000 for a magic trick?
Scott Cram
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It's time for a 5-year update: Chris Wasshuber has just dropped the price on his Knight's Tour routine by $9,975.

Why buy this when my free lesssons are still available? Well, I explain that in today's blog entry!
Enzo
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Do you know if anyone actually bought it? Guess not, otherwise the 99.75% discount would be pretty stupid.

Thanks for refreshing the thread though, your tutorial on the Knights Tour is great!
Enzo
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From the description on Lybrary.com:
Quote:
This manuscript describes in detail this method, which I developed from scratch without knowledge of any other system.


Would that be an attempt to retroactively justify the initial price?
Chris
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It is wonderful to see a discussion about a great effect, the knight's tour. Since there is quite a bit of speculation and confusion regarding the historical pricing of it, allow me to explain.

I developed my method 20 years ago. And since I did this from scratch without knowledge of any other method, I was pretty proud of my achievement. I have never seen anybody perform a knight's tour with spectator selected start AND end. Twenty years ago I would have never parted with my creation. I was simply too proud of it. I knew I had something unique just for myself. And I had plans to structure this into a one of a kind performance and tour the world.

But as the years progressed circumstances changed. I did not tour the world with it, nor did I structure a full performance around it. I performed it in close-up settings and parlor settings, but eventually lost interest as a performance piece. It is hard to say why I didn't do more with it. But when you are young all kinds of different interests pull you in many directions.

Five years ago in 2004 I knew that I had no interest to perform as a stage magician. I am a close-up kind of guy. And since I started to build my Lybrary.com business I decided to offer my knight's tour for sale. But I was still very much emotionally attached to my method. Even after 15 years I had not seen anything comparable, and I was still mighty proud of my achievement from 15 years ago. So I didn't want to sell it as the average magic trick. And so I came up with this $10,000 one per state/country idea. My intention was to find a handful of seriously interested people with whom I would practice this effect one-on-one. So the $10,000 included face time and personal instruction, as well as a pretty good protection against copy cats.

A few days after I had posted this offer I pulled it because I simply didn't want to let go of my method. It is hard to describe what goes through your mind, but anybody who has created something before will understand that it is not so easy to let go of your 'baby'.

And now in 2009, after another 5 years, you could say I finally am able to let go of what is probably my most significant creation in magic as of today. My reasons for releasing this have changed from personally teaching a handful of performers, to giving any serious student of magic a chance to learn my method. That is why it is now only $25. The difficulty creates its own exclusivity. There won't be many who decide to master my method and perform it. Nevertheless, I hope that the ones who read it will add their own thinking and further improve on what I created.

I hope that explains it. Scott Cram's blogpost (link above) fairly captures what is new and unique in my method. And I am still mighty proud of it!
Lybrary.com preserving magic one book at a time.
AllanK
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I've been playing with Chris's method for the past couple of weeks and can quite confidently say that it is a breakthrough in the performance of the Knight's Tour. I could never commit to memory the standard Corinda sequence - to me it's just a random string of numbers. Chris's method uses a memorised array of numbers with patterns galore, making it very easy to learn. Not only that, you can perform it blindfolded, making it perfect to use with Lior Manor's "21'st Century Knight's Tour".

I've only become interested in the Knight's Tour during the past year and would never consider performing it in a regular show. However, I do have occasion to perform for groups of mathematicians and mathematics teachers - something like the Knight's Tour would go down really well. I think your "regular" group of mathematicians could easily dismiss the usual "cyclic" tour as a feat of memory, but being able to select both the starting and finishing square takes this to a whole new level. I realise that there are other ways of doing this. I've also tried Scott Cramm's elegant method, but his method requires you to see the board. Chris's method is largely done by memory work and, as such, is suited to a "performance piece" where you can be facing away from a large board (or screen in the case of Mr Manor's excellent program).

You will be surprised at how easy this method is. Making it entertaining is another thing altogether!

Congratulations, Chris!

AllanK
smith83
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This sounds very interesting
Chris
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Allan, thanks a lot for your kind words. I can confirm that this effect is very effective with 'brainy' people, scientists, academics, chess players, smart people in general. I also want to stress that this plays strong close-up. I have done this effect for small groups of people on the table or individuals with great effect.
Lybrary.com preserving magic one book at a time.
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