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The Magic Cafe Forum Index Ľ Ľ Latest and Greatest? Ľ Ľ At the Table Live Lecture - Jack Carpenter 12/3/2014 (2 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

MarcusC
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Tonight Murphy's Magic Supplies has the honor of welcoming the one and only Jack Carpenter to host his first At the Table lecture, live from Murphy's studio at 4pm PT / 7pm ET!



The lecture will be available for streaming and download from your favorite Murphy's dealer!

"Jack Carpenter has contributed over 40 years of his life to the art of magic. His sleight of hand techniques are truly one of a kind. Jack WILL completely FRY your mind as he takes you down one path only to completely de-rail what you THINK you know.. THAT is the reason why Jack Carpenter has been praised by some of the top cardmen in magic today. From his published books, to manuscripts, to DVDs, Jack has spent a lifetime paving the way for the die-hard sleight of hand enthusiasts.

This will be YOUR chance to learn NEVER BEFORE published material from one of magic's true legends. In this "sleight of hand course", Jack will be going over:

Card steals, shuffles and controls. PLUS Jack will show you some never before seen routines that utilize these moves. Here are just a few of the items that Jack will be sharing with you:

Way Off Balance - Freely place 4 aces on to the table and then place the rest of the deck in the box. With NO funny movements, the deck is seen to instantly be on the table, leaving only the 4 aces in the box. Highly visual card magic!

Gambling Protection 101 - After shuffling and cutting the deck several times, you spread the cards on to the table. You reach into your jacket pocket and show that you have stolen all of the red cards, leaving only the black cards behind.

The NEW Carpenter Shuffle Shift - Place 4 aces into four different parts of the deck. Execute a few riffle shuffles. With NO funny moves, the Aces all end up gathering under your drink! (This is just one of MANY applications that utilize this fantastic move.)

NOTE: Due to the nature of live events, the trick list may change."
Marcus001
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Strangely quiet on this thread. Anyone see it?
Ceierry
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Very Very quiet..
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necro555
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I didn't see the lecture live, but when I logged into the vanishinginc website, there were all these error messages about technical difficulties and that it would not be streaming live anymore and you would need to wait for the download to become available. So essentially, you pretty much couldn't stream it live after a while.

Overall it was a fairly average lecture. Many things I wouldn't do or use, but that comes down to my personal taste. The gambler's table shift he taught was pretty interesting.

I will say I'm a big fan of jack carpenters early work, but not such a fan of many of his new ideas. That being said, there is potential in there.
krazykat
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Has anyone else seen this that can comment?
necro555
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Quote:
On Dec 9, 2014, krazykat wrote:
Has anyone else seen this that can comment?


What exactly do you want to know?
Ceierry
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What was teached, the routines, etc Smile
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necro555
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Contents:

$21 Dollar Hustle
King Swing
King Swing Cut Re Visited
Slip Cuts At The Gambling Table
Pocket Triumph
Way Off Balance
Shuffle Shift
Scissor Shift
Table Shift
Leclaire Pass
Jailhouse Shuffle
Z Overhand False Shuffle
Favorite Zarrow
Pimped Out Charlier
The Count Palm
MarcusC
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There were indeed a bit of technical issues with this lecture, our apologies for that. However anyone who purchased it can watch it as a download and there should be no issues at all with the downloaded lecture video. Smile
Jack Carpenter
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Yes, unfortunately they went off line a couple of times due to issues with the WiFi as well as a mother board of some kind that burned up a couple of days previously, forcing them to use a computer that was not sufficient in some way - I don't really know the technicalities. This was surprising, as I thought if anything was going to go wrong, it would be with my card tricks!

In any event, the technical team dealt with the problems (that have never happened before, and won't happen again) expertly, so the finished downloadable product is not deficient in anyway - you will get your money's worth I think! I did notice that the TOC supplied with the video was missing two items that I did perform- "The Automated Card Steal," and the "Lady Killer" routine. Rest assured that they are in there, just not listed in the accompanying TOC.

I'm pretty sure there are at least a few items that will strike a chord with everyone, and plenty for all to play with.

Have fun!

Jack
goatears
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Jack Carpenter is the definition of the hardcore card guy. The majority of the material discussed on this lecture is tough, even the easier stuff requires some sleight of hand. Carpenter really relishes the art of card magic and takes his creative cues from the classics as well as young magicians like Patrick Kun, Lee Asher and Dan and Dave. This is definitely not a lecture for the feint of heart when it comes to sleight of hand with cards.

The Twenty-One Dollar Hustle: Using just a few bucks the magician is able to show a fun hustle with a magical climax. The spectator asks for change for a twenty and upon receiving the money they are found to be four dollars short. This is a great trick that you can perform out of your pockets or wallet. There are no gimmicks needed and the sleights are very easy to accomplish. This may be my favorite piece on the lecture and I plan on using it.

King Swing: 4 Kings are removed, a selection is made and lost in the pack. The Kings change to aces and then vanish to reveal the selected card. If that sounds a bit complex it is supposed to, that is the premise of the trick. The idea is that magicians like to make things as complicated as possible. This is a pretty big showpiece and while I donít feel like the presentation was as polished as it could be with a couple minor tweaks I feel like a talented magician could make this into a theatrical piece of magic. There are some pieces in it that donít seem to flow real great and it needs a lot of table space. It is one of the less difficult pieces on the lecture but it isnít too easy either.

Slip Cut Jam: This is one of my favorite parts of live lectures. Although he was not planning on it Jack goes into a session on the slip cut, how to use it and what he thinks are dos and doníts when it comes to this classic move. He gives some valuable info concerning authentic gambling situations here as well.

Pocket Triumph: Jack calls this an almost self-working triumph. This routine would not really be considered self working but with a little practice it is performable at one point it does require the magician to perform a p**m and I know that many magicians will shy away from it for that reason. There is a great substitute for the Tenkai optical revolve taught here as well as an interesting presentation point that really sells this as a super-natural feat. This is not an easy or extremely magical version of triumph but it is a very impressive routine.

Way Off Balance: This is a startling instantaneous transposition of the aces and the rest of the deck inside the box. The method is very devious and the handling is fairly bold. It uses a classic Marlo move and it completely fooled me the first time. I wonít be using this but I do love how startling it was.

Shuffle Shift: This is a multiple shift that can be used to control a four of a kind that has been distributed throughout the deck to the bottom in the action of performing an in the hands shuffle. He also shows how to reverse the cards as well. To tell the truth the reversal is slightly easier then the control. In Carpenterís hands itís not the most elegant of moves and he really plays it up to look pretty sloppy. For those who put the time in to master it, this could be a very useful move and you donít need a table to perform it. I would prefer other methods for the most part.

Scissor Shift: You can control q four of a kind that has been distributed through the deck up to the top in the midst of doing a one handed shuffle. If you can do a one handed shuffle then it wont be too difficult to master. If you canít do a one handed shuffle then you have years of practice ahead of you in order to do this.

Table Shift: Using a brilliant innovation by Howie Schwartzman Jack has created and excellent table shift that you can perform directly from a hard table. This is pretty easy to do and is a full deck switch. I agree with Jack when he says that it really fits actual cheating scenarios best but this is a really sweet move that looks very natural.

LeClaire Pass: This is an application of a principle taught in Charlie Millerís cascade control. It is readapted in Carpenterís hands to look very pretty but not nearly as flashy as Millerís classic. Jack performs this beautifully but I could not get my hands to do it right. This will take some practice. It is most useful to control a single card to the top of the deck without a table.

The Jail House Shuffle: From time to time during the lecture it is really tough to follow Jacks movements. This is one of those times. He goes over a simple way to stack a deck and a way to perform a very pretty full deck false shuffle. It took me a good 15 minutes just to perform the false shuffle once because it was referenced so vaguely and Iím still lost as to how he stacked the deck. I would have liked some more clarification here because both applications are not technically difficult and could be very useful.

Z-Break Shuffle: This is a very natural approach to an overhand shuffle and it keeps the entire order of the deck. It is very simple and is taught very clearly. One of its selling points is that you donít need to do any single card runs to perform the shuffle but you can add a few if youíd like. This is chunky shuffle sequence which has itís place from time to time but I prefer a more elegant shuffle.

Zarrow: Jackís work on the Zarrow is beautiful. He has combined a deceptive running cut and telescope display here that make the Zarrow look extremely deceptive. This is the kind of shuffle that you could use exclusively and no one would be the wiser.

Pimped out Charlier: The Charlier shuffle is one of the most underused and easy to do shuffles out there. To add an extra layer of deception and elegance Carpenter has figured a way to add a nice cascade to the mix. This might be the easiest piece taught on the lecture and it is beautiful.

The Lightning Palm and Lady Killer: Wow this is a powerful move. I can get the idea of what is going on but he never actually broke the move down. He performs it a few times and explains what is happening but you never actually see the sleight. This is complex and there is very little real explanation of it all.
The Pure Count: This has similar problems with the lightning palm. Basically you can steal a card away as you reverse count a small packet. It looks great but there needs to be more detail in order to learn it properly.

The Fingertip Count: While this is a bit more advanced it then the top two palms it is explained just a little better. Basically you are able to count 4 cards in a stand up situation and palm off one invisibly. It looks so great I just wish the teaching was a bit more in depth as I said before.

Mixing moves by Allan Ackerman Lee Asher and Hofzinser you get a great palm that you can do while the spectator believes that their card is outjogged in the deck. This is a fun move but is tough to perform. Itís the kind of card sleight that move monkeys will really like. I prefer Patrick Kunís Mirror Force for these situations but Jackís move is very interesting in its own right. He really jams a little bit on each idea from each creator, this was the most interesting to me.

If you are into the small detailed sleights and intricacies in card magic then this is a great lecture for you. Some moves are covered in depth with others being just touched on leaving you with a lot of work to do on your own. The hard core card guys out there will be sure to find something that will get their creative juices flowing. For the talented move monkeys as well this is a must have.
Ray Haining
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Goatears, thanks for the review, very helpful. Although Carpenter's work is generally above my skill level, it is the little bits of business, touches, subtleties, different slants on classic moves and plots, that make it worthwhile to watch anything put out by him.
krazykat
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Thank you goatears for the detailed review. Is this all new material, or is there overlap with Mr. Carpenter's earlier books/DVDs?
goatears
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Here's a link to all of my video reviews of the Murphy's lectures

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL......nyRFkRst

Below is an indepth review of jack Carpenter's lecture.

Jack Carpenter is the definition of the hardcore card guy. The majority of the material discussed on this lecture is tough, even the easier stuff requires some sleight of hand. Carpenter really relishes the art of card magic and takes his creative cues from the classics as well as young magicians like Patrick Kun, Lee Asher and Dan and Dave. This is definitely not a lecture for the feint of heart when it comes to sleight of hand with cards.

The Twenty-One Dollar Hustle: Using just a few bucks the magician is able to show a fun hustle with a magical climax. The spectator asks for change for a twenty and upon receiving the money they are found to be four dollars short. This is a great trick that you can perform out of your pockets or wallet. There are no gimmicks needed and the sleights are very easy to accomplish. This may be my favorite piece on the lecture and I plan on using it.

King Swing: 4 Kings are removed, a selection is made and lost in the pack. The Kings change to aces and then vanish to reveal the selected card. If that sounds a bit complex it is supposed to, that is the premise of the trick. The idea is that magicians like to make things as complicated as possible. This is a pretty big showpiece and while I donít feel like the presentation was as polished as it could be with a couple minor tweaks I feel like a talented magician could make this into a theatrical piece of magic. There are some pieces in it that donít seem to flow real great and it needs a lot of table space. It is one of the less difficult pieces on the lecture but it isnít too easy either.

Slip Cut Jam: This is one of my favorite parts of live lectures. Although he was not planning on it Jack goes into a session on the slip cut, how to use it and what he thinks are dos and doníts when it comes to this classic move. He gives some valuable info concerning authentic gambling situations here as well.

Pocket Triumph: Jack calls this an almost self-working triumph. This routine would not really be considered self working but with a little practice it is performable at one point it does require the magician to perform a p**m and I know that many magicians will shy away from it for that reason. There is a great substitute for the Tenkai optical revolve taught here as well as an interesting presentation point that really sells this as a super-natural feat. This is not an easy or extremely magical version of triumph but it is a very impressive routine.

Way Off Balance: This is a startling instantaneous transposition of the aces and the rest of the deck inside the box. The method is very devious and the handling is fairly bold. It uses a classic Marlo move and it completely fooled me the first time. I wonít be using this but I do love how startling it was.

Shuffle Shift: This is a multiple shift that can be used to control a four of a kind that has been distributed throughout the deck to the bottom in the action of performing an in the hands shuffle. He also shows how to reverse the cards as well. To tell the truth the reversal is slightly easier then the control. In Carpenterís hands itís not the most elegant of moves and he really plays it up to look pretty sloppy. For those who put the time in to master it, this could be a very useful move and you donít need a table to perform it. I would prefer other methods for the most part.

Scissor Shift: You can control q four of a kind that has been distributed through the deck up to the top in the midst of doing a one handed shuffle. If you can do a one handed shuffle then it wont be too difficult to master. If you canít do a one handed shuffle then you have years of practice ahead of you in order to do this.

Table Shift: Using a brilliant innovation by Howie Schwartzman Jack has created and excellent table shift that you can perform directly from a hard table. This is pretty easy to do and is a full deck switch. I agree with Jack when he says that it really fits actual cheating scenarios best but this is a really sweet move that looks very natural.

LeClaire Pass: This is an application of a principle taught in Charlie Millerís cascade control. It is readapted in Carpenterís hands to look very pretty but not nearly as flashy as Millerís classic. Jack performs this beautifully but I could not get my hands to do it right. This will take some practice. It is most useful to control a single card to the top of the deck without a table.

The Jail House Shuffle: From time to time during the lecture it is really tough to follow Jacks movements. This is one of those times. He goes over a simple way to stack a deck and a way to perform a very pretty full deck false shuffle. It took me a good 15 minutes just to perform the false shuffle once because it was referenced so vaguely and Iím still lost as to how he stacked the deck. I would have liked some more clarification here because both applications are not technically difficult and could be very useful.

Z-Break Shuffle: This is a very natural approach to an overhand shuffle and it keeps the entire order of the deck. It is very simple and is taught very clearly. One of its selling points is that you donít need to do any single card runs to perform the shuffle but you can add a few if youíd like. This is chunky shuffle sequence which has itís place from time to time but I prefer a more elegant shuffle.

Zarrow: Jackís work on the Zarrow is beautiful. He has combined a deceptive running cut and telescope display here that make the Zarrow look extremely deceptive. This is the kind of shuffle that you could use exclusively and no one would be the wiser.

Pimped out Charlier: The Charlier shuffle is one of the most underused and easy to do shuffles out there. To add an extra layer of deception and elegance Carpenter has figured a way to add a nice cascade to the mix. This might be the easiest piece taught on the lecture and it is beautiful.

The Lightning Palm and Lady Killer: Wow this is a powerful move. I can get the idea of what is going on but he never actually broke the move down. He performs it a few times and explains what is happening but you never actually see the sleight. This is complex and there is very little real explanation of it all.
The Pure Count: This has similar problems with the lightning palm. Basically you can steal a card away as you reverse count a small packet. It looks great but there needs to be more detail in order to learn it properly.

The Fingertip Count: While this is a bit more advanced it then the top two palms it is explained just a little better. Basically you are able to count 4 cards in a stand up situation and palm off one invisibly. It looks so great I just wish the teaching was a bit more in depth as I said before.

Mixing moves by Allan Ackerman Lee Asher and Hofzinser you get a great palm that you can do while the spectator believes that their card is outjogged in the deck. This is a fun move but is tough to perform. Itís the kind of card sleight that move monkeys will really like. I prefer Patrick Kunís Mirror Force for these situations but Jackís move is very interesting in its own right. He really jams a little bit on each idea from each creator, this was the most interesting to me.

If you are into the small detailed sleights and intricacies in card magic then this is a great lecture for you. Some moves are covered in depth with others being just touched on leaving you with a lot of work to do on your own. The hard core card guys out there will be sure to find something that will get their creative juices flowing. For the talented move monkeys as well this is a must have.
mysticmelville
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Anybody by chance got a copy of Modus Operandi for sale in the UK?
Cheers
The Magic Cafe Forum Index Ľ Ľ Latest and Greatest? Ľ Ľ At the Table Live Lecture - Jack Carpenter 12/3/2014 (2 Likes)
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