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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » Card College 1 In Da House! (4 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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KenRyan
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I finally got my copy of Giobbi's Card College 1! Good timing too, since I'm just finishing up his (Giobbi's) "Introduction To Card Magic." Woohoo!

Ken

ps- And I'm palming a coin as I type this:).
Mike Gilbert
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Las Vegas, Nevada
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Good man! Get some!
-Mike Gilbert Smile

"Most of us have two lives. The life we live, and the unlived life within us. Between the two stands Resistance."- Steven Pressfield
Kaneda
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Keithville, LA
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I just started on chapter 4 of CC1 if you need any help don't hesitate to pm me with questions you might have I should be able to help
KenRyan
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Thanks Kaneda. It turns out I was not as close to "done" with "Introduction To Card Magic" as I thought. Spent most of the night working on it. I have been LOVING (needing!) the YouTube video links in ICM. At least 3 times I have misunderstood the description of a move EVEN WITH with photographs (as opposed to the hand-drawn illustrations in CC). It was only when I saw his (Giobbi) video of the move on YT that I understood.

Do you happen to know if there are videos for CC1 as well? Since I have an actual book this time (as opposed to the pdf for ICM), I won't have the convenience of clicking on a link to see a video of the move.

Thanks for the offer, BTW!

Cheers!

Ken
Invisticone
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Roberto Giobbi has an eponymous DVD series that accompanies the books.
Mortimer Graves
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Congratulations, you've acquired one of the best sources for learning professional-quality card magic. I read it years ago, and I felt like I'd just finally stepped into the modern era! Everything I'd read up to that point was at least a hundred years old!

The Card College series will help to set you in good stead as a card worker. I applaud your good judgement, and I'm sure many would agree.
'Tis an ill wind that blows no minds.

Hastur, Hastur, Hastur! See? Nothing hap-

...and if we rub each other the wrong way, let's try going in another direction. - Pokey the Porcupine
mlippo
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Trieste (Italy)
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You couldn't have started your voyage in card magic better!!!

mlippo
KenRyan
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Thanks Mortimer and mlippo! I only knew to go this route by joining this forum when I wasn't even sure if I was too old (just turned 50) to START learning magic just 28 days ago! I'm already so spoiled by Giobbi (mostly going through his "Introduction To Card Magic" pdf word-by-word) that in looking to coin magic (my 2 resources there so far are Bobo's "Modern Coin Magic" and the Coinvanish.com site), I'm like "where do start? How do I build? What are the fundamentals and the step-by-step? Why isn't there a "coin kata?" etc.

Anyway, thanks again for the encouragement!!

Ken
Mortimer Graves
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I believe Bill Tarr's Now You See It, Now You Don't! and Henry Hay's Amateur Magician's Handbook are excellent resources for the beginner in magic, and I wish I still owned them.

As for professional-quality classical (and modern) training, the Tarbell Course, Bobo, Giobbi, and even the Mark Wilson course are good, and especially in the case of Tarbell, though it was all written a long time ago and reads that way, you'd not only learn magic, but how to be a magician.

Henry Hay's book is underappreciated, in my opinion, simply because nobody wants to look like an amateur. What he has to say about magic and its performance as an entertainment is invaluable.

Beware the creeping cynicism and hubris that often attend one's entry into magic, and absorb as much real knowledge as you can, and you'll be just fine.

As for starting off, and what to learn, if something seems too hard or frightening to pull off properly, leave it be and try something that seems easier, then come back to it later when you've got more of a feel for it.

Also, be aware that even complicated and advanced sleight of hand is about lightness and smoothness. Relax that death-grip on the cards and use their natural, gliding properties to assist you, use gravity as an aid to things when you can, rather than fighting against it, and everything will become much easier.

Relax, be natural, and enjoy it, and the people who see what you do will be more likely to enjoy it as well.

When you feel you know enough to want some real meat-and-bones theory and philosophy, try Dariel Fitzkee and Tommy Wonder.

Hopefully you'll have enough here to keep you busy for the next few centuries, if you do it right.
'Tis an ill wind that blows no minds.

Hastur, Hastur, Hastur! See? Nothing hap-

...and if we rub each other the wrong way, let's try going in another direction. - Pokey the Porcupine
KenRyan
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Thanks Mortimer! Notes taken:).

Ken
Mortimer Graves
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As an addendum, on the subject of coin katas, looking into the type of effect known as the "one-coin flurry" will be of great assistance. A good one-coin flurry is almost a requirement for anyone who does coin stuff, and is a cool way to, with a single coin, demonstrate (and practice) your abilities in the simplest manner possible.

Doug Conn's version of this effect (Tricks Of My Trade : the magic of Doug Conn, written by Paul Cummins, includes it, I think) is what really set me in good stead as a coin worker. There are several different vanishes and productions, ending up with the coin appearing on the table, right under the spectator's noses!

It's some bold stuff, and not the easiest sort of thing for a beginner, but if you want a coin kata that's serious as a heart attack, that's the one I can recommend from experience.

I don't perform outdoors much anymore, but as a busker this was always my opener, and nobody ever walks away after seeing it; they always want more. When I saw Doug perform it, it was the most powerful stuff I had ever seen done with a half-dollar.
'Tis an ill wind that blows no minds.

Hastur, Hastur, Hastur! See? Nothing hap-

...and if we rub each other the wrong way, let's try going in another direction. - Pokey the Porcupine
Kabbalah
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Sent you a PM.
"Long may magicians fascinate and continue to be fascinated by the mystery potential in a pack of cards."
~Cliff Green

"The greatest tricks ever performed are not done at all. The audience simply think they see them."
~ John Northern Hilliard
Theodore Lawton
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I second the Henry Hay book! If you get a chance to pick it up cheap on Amazon do so. I still go back to it for sleights and ideas. That book is where I learned to do the shift; the pass, to all the young whippersnappers nowadays!

http://www.amazon.com/Magicians-Handbook......handbook

I've searched for Tricks Of My Trade. If you find it, snatch it up!

But, enjoy CC1, there is great stuff in there. I perform Hat Trick in combination with a trick by Harry Lorayne called Gambler's Luck to open my close up sets.

Smile
Magic is the bacon in the breakfast of life.

............................................

God bless you and have a magical day
pjpastir
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Okay,
I just found Henry Hay's Amateur Magician's Handbook in my book collection. It is the "New expanded edition" I bought it in the seventies. I have to admit that I have never given it a serious read however it seems that I have missed a gem. If anyone cares to comment or point to some insights they've found in this book, I would be interested. If you would care to guess at the price on the inside cover of the book when I bought it new (hardcover-386 pages-illustrated) back then, you may be surprised!
Paul
Theodore Lawton
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There's lots of great stuff in that book! From sleights to show advice... I'd say just read the whole thing and see what you like. Smile
Magic is the bacon in the breakfast of life.

............................................

God bless you and have a magical day
Mortimer Graves
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New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A.
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What he has to say on performance and what it takes to be a real magician is priceless. That's the real value to be found in his book. If you can listen to what he says, and never lose sight of it, you will become a real magician. I agree with Bob Cassidy when he says that if the title didn't have the word "amateur" in it, it would probably get a lot more respect from the fraternity at large.

Anyone who's never read it really needs to.
'Tis an ill wind that blows no minds.

Hastur, Hastur, Hastur! See? Nothing hap-

...and if we rub each other the wrong way, let's try going in another direction. - Pokey the Porcupine
Kaneda
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Keithville, LA
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I own a copy of The Amateur Magicians Handbook and considering going through that as my second book after really studying CC1. I also considered maybe reading a book on theory after CC1 just to learn how to take the effects I have learned and make it something special construct an act before moving onto another effect/sleight book. Not sure which is the best way to go. Maybe there is no real best way to go and that what makes magic great because you can go into so many different directions with it and let yourself just enjoy the journey
Mortimer Graves
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New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A.
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As for figuring out what you actually want to do (another way of saying which direction you wish to go in) a good start is to actually watch as much magic as possible, and try to see what suits your personality best. It's not the same as doing the effects you like the best; often the ones we don't like are the ones our audiences love the most when we do them.

I used to hate the linking rings. My mentor told me that this was a sure sign that I needed to learn them and perform them. When the rings turned out to be the one effect I did which got spontaneous applause, I knew he was right. I don't do them anymore (I wore the chrome off of them and never got around to buying another set), but they sure opened my eyes.

Once you know what suits you, find the easiest methods for performing those effects, so you can perform them without losing your presentation in a cloud of "geez, I better not mess this up". Focus on your presentation and listen to your audiences, see how they respond and adjust your timing and speech to suit, and you'll naturally grow from there.

I'd say three effects are good for a start. Learn three and do them well, and then add more to your repertoire. Most importantly, take your time, be patient with yourself, and don't think you have to become an instant master. No mighty oak ever grew faster by being pulled up by its roots. It kills (or at least deforms and stunts) the tree.
'Tis an ill wind that blows no minds.

Hastur, Hastur, Hastur! See? Nothing hap-

...and if we rub each other the wrong way, let's try going in another direction. - Pokey the Porcupine
pjpastir
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"If you would care to guess at the price on the inside cover of the book when I bought it new (hardcover-386 pages-illustrated) back then, you may be surprised"

$7.95

Paul
Pepsi Twist
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Bexhill UK
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Don't get too taken in my all the other suggested further reading though Ken! In magic it's sooo easy to pick up a book to learn stuff, get suggested a ton of others then end up with a whole shelf of books you've barely read, let alone studied or performed anything from!! Maybe keep a list of sugggested titles (Henry Hay's book really is good) but concentrate on working through Card College, one of the finest books around!
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