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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » DVDs? Really? In 2014? (25 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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tommyellison
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Quote:
On Dec 29, 2014, Bob Sanders wrote:
Thanks Tommy!

This helped me find the store in Birmingham.


The Apple Store at the Summit gets almost as much money as the Magic dealers I trade with... LOL

See ya soon at a Ring 35 meeting.

Tommy
markymarkmagicuk
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Having grown up in Magic from the late 70s, books were my only choice from the local library. However, I did love buying a new magic trick from a toy store back then and getting home, opening the box, checking out the props to see if I could see the secret, then eventually sit there with props in hand whilst reading through the instructions (usually very badly written on a small piece of paper). It was all part of the hobby/interest, reading instructions or books on magic.
But we have reached the world of tech and I have to admit in this fast paced world we now live in, watching a video tutorial is so much better.
I know that joining a magic club is good, unfortunately these are few and far between, and not always possible to get too, so to have a person demonstrate a move or sleight on video is like having a personal tutor in your room, and most of the time much easier to understand than the written word or a dozen poorly photographed pictures in a book!
As I come from a time before internet and YouTube, I still like to buy the actual DVD (something I can keep and pick up, something tangible), unlike my kids whose entire music collection is in digital download on a hard drive, not quite the same to me!
In conclusion, Books are nice to read at times, but video is so much easier (or maybe that's because I'm lazy!!)
Arabian tricker
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Books combined with videos is the best choice!
tommyellison
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I was watching the old original movie Time Machine by H.G. Wells the other day, and in the future, all the books/history/archives had been translated into some type of magical ring that when spun, actually played an audio broadcast of the archived info.

http://youtu.be/6NRMYUpgyJ8

Is this where we are going? Fun to consider that someone is probably working on such technology that surpasses all existing devices to provide a generic method of accessing the history of the race.

<Daydream over> Back to work...
Harry Lorayne
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I don't know for sure why it "fits" here, but I've written it quite a few times - "...quite often for every bit of progress we take a step or two backward."
[email]harrylorayne@earthlink.net[/email]

http://www.harrylorayne.com
http://www.harryloraynemagic.com
Andrew Zuber
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Quote:
On Dec 14, 2014, Kabbalah wrote:
*Visual learning* is nonsense. How did folks learn before the computer age?

Books are forever.

You are very obviously not a teacher.
"I'm sorry - if you were right, I would agree with you." -Robin Williams, Awakenings
Remillard
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I for one find that the combination of books and video works best for me. Visual demonstration of sleights can help make the verbal descriptions much clearer. Having said that, books can go into much more detail on the reasoning and philosophy behind a move. A video may show you HOW a move is done, but a book will tell you WHY it is done.
Bill Thompson
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First of all I have nothing against DVD/Video, Heck I own several and they are wonderful tools to learn from. But, I still think that the ability to "read magic" must not be discarded. It is a skill that develops over time. Reading magic is hard, it hard to comprehend and written in what seems to be different language. But there is far too much that you will never know unless you develop this skill.
"To let understanding stop at what cannot be understood is a high attainment.
Those who cannot do it will be destroyed on the lathe of heaven." - Chuang Tse
Wilktone
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The idea of adapting instruction to a student's learning style originated in the 1970s (some of you my age might remember taking those standardized tests that were supposed to tell what sort of learner you were). There has been a lot of time to tweak this pedagogical approach and really investigate it scientifically. Our current understanding is that adapting instruction because a student has a supposed learning style does not show better end results. If you feel you're a "visual learner" what you really are expressing is a particular learning preference. Limiting yourself to only visual media will not help you learn as well as taking in other media as well.

Magic is a visual art. I don't understand why anyone would want to discourage a beginner from learning it in a visual medium. Books have a lot of value too. In-person instruction, of course, being the best case scenario. Depending on how serious a magician you want to become, everyone will have to make their own choices of which media to emphasize in their study according to their own goals and particular level of interest and ability.

That said, I think that the type of media you use is less important than the quality of instruction you're getting. Personally, I prefer to look for materials by magicians who demonstrate good teaching using good material, whether it be on the page or on the screen.

Dave
funsway
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Dave, you have a unique opportunity to chat with Ricky Boone there in Asheville.

You can learn things of magic other than from "learning styles.' Maybe you can even be part of the Vanishing WheelChair Project.

I am not far away either. and have some VHS's you might enjoy ;-)
"the more one pretends at magic, the more awe and wonder will be found in real life." Arnold Furst



ShareBooks at www.eversway.com * questions at funsway@eversway.com
55Hudson
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Quote:
On Jan 7, 2015, Wilktone wrote:

That said, I think that the type of media you use is less important than the quality of instruction you're getting. Personally, I prefer to look for materials by magicians who demonstrate good teaching using good material, whether it be on the page or on the screen.

Dave



Well said

Hudson
SamanthaO
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KenRyan, Idk if you know there's this DVD-player-disk-drive which you can attach to your laptop via USB port... That would solve your problems somewhat I should think.

Books are good in that they really force you to think about your presentation so much more. I find that most of the time when I learn from a video, I pick up the performer's way of doing it but when I learn from a book, I'm forced to be more creative. Pros and cons.

Def think it's also a matter of getting used to the style of writing.

Join a magic club! But also when you struggle on your own with books etc it forces you to adapt the handling to your own style and hands instead of continually doing it in XYZ's handling, which may not look as natural/as good as a way of doing it in your own hands.
B. Edwards
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The problem I had especially with card magic books is I'm left-handed, so while reading, in my mind I have to think "the left is right, right is left." Needless to say, this can make for slow learning and a bit confusing sometimes.

Videos work best for me because I can 'mirror' the actions as I see them. I am starting to warm up to e-books and have bought several so far. I've done a bit of PDF editing over the years, so if I can figure a way of batch editing and switching the words "right hand" and left hand" in the PDFs, I'll have a much easier time absorbing the information. As I would now have a left-handed magic book. Smile


Brian
1KJ
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I understand that streaming video is part of your business, but that always makes me nervous. What if the company housing the video goes out of business? I prefer to have either DVDs or downloads.
funsway
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Quote:
On Jan 27, 2015, B. Edwards wrote:
The problem I had especially with card magic books is I'm left-handed, so while reading, in my mind I have to think "the left is right, right is left." Needless to say, this can make for slow learning and a bit confusing sometimes.

Videos work best for me because I can 'mirror' the actions as I see them. I am starting to warm up to e-books and have bought several so far. I've done a bit of PDF editing over the years, so if I can figure a way of batch editing and switching the words "right hand" and left hand" in the PDFs, I'll have a much easier time absorbing the information. As I would now have a left-handed magic book. Smile


Brian


I can imagine you watching a video in a mirror -- and illusion of an illusion,

but then you might wind up performing with your back to the audience.

Seriously, if you look for the "method" rather than the "technique" the hand orientation will not matter so much.

My hand disabilities prevent me from doing many standard sleights such as CP, but I do not skip those effects -- and the learning approach doesn't matter. I use what is available.

I start with the desired end result and work backwards. I use alternative sleights or invent new ones.

However, recent neurobiological studies have shown that a left to right scanning is innate in the animal world.

This means your audience will be more comfortable observing effects that move from their left to their right.

Not saying you should learn to do all effects right handed -- just something to thing about.

You might also stick to card effect with vertical orientation and it won't matter.
"the more one pretends at magic, the more awe and wonder will be found in real life." Arnold Furst



ShareBooks at www.eversway.com * questions at funsway@eversway.com
B. Edwards
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Funsway, I appreciate the tips, thanks. Smile

But I've spent almost 50 years adapting to a "right-handed" world (I even learned to play guitar right-handed). Magic is just a hobby to me, I have no ambitions to get paid for what I do. I just want to study some great magic from the masters, and entertain a few friends when asked. No one has pointed out that I was performing left-handed in the past. So I see no reason to change now. I do practice a few things right-handed such as fans and peeks, I even do a decent right-handed Elmsley. Smile

I too, have some "hand disabilities". Numbness in part of my right hand and several fingers. I have had to change the way of doing some things. So I'm not likely to be an expert card manipulator in this lifetime. Smile

But, like you... I overcome and adapt.

It's something I've been doing since I was a child. Smile


Brian
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