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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The Science of Magic » » Chemically change milk brown? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

nautimike
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I'm trying to work out a routine where I "vanish" two chocolate bars (using Sugar Rush - Brian Platt) and then remove a silk/hanky that was covering a clear glass of white milk (preferably held by a spectator) to reveal it has turned "chocolate". Then I'd move into Overstuft - Bizzaro.

I'm looking for a way to make the milk appear chocolate without any suspicious moves like stirring, and I was thinking there might be a way to do it chemically. Does anyone have any ideas?

Mike
TheMightyRicardo
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Hi Nautimike,
Mix a little potassium iodide with the milk beforehand, then add hydrogen peroxide mixed with vinegar when you want to produce the "chocolate" milk. Other chemicals will work but these three are non-poisonous in small quantities. (The "chocolate milk" produced contains iodine and is poisonous)

Richard
nautimike
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Thanks Richard.
Do you know off hand if it requires stirring, or will it disperse automatically? Also, are you saying this mixture is poisonous, but safe in small quantities? Do you have any source you can point me in for quantities of needed of these chemicals?

-Mike
TheMightyRicardo
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Hi Nautimike,
In the lab you would just pour one solution into the other, which would cause it to mix without stirring. To perform you would need an excuse to add "water" to the milk while it is covered. Awkward.
Potassium iodide, hydrogen peroxide and vinegar are swallowed by people in small doses all the time (iodised salt, mouthwash and salads) but when mixed give a brown colour due to iodine, which should not be swallowed at all.
Vinegar and hydrogen peroxide you can get cheaply at any supermarket. Potassium iodide you may be able to get as tablets at a pharmacy (expensive) or order online. If you are performing for a High school or College, their science lab could easily supply you.

Richard
Stucky
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They make mugs that automatically stir from the bottom I have seen. Maybe modify one of those? Have syrup preset in the bottom.
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nautimike
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That sounds interesting. And definitely safer for a spectator to be holding on to.
What's your opinion of the mug appearing to self stir, or the noise it might make?
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Stucky
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No idea. I have never messed with one. I wouldn't have someone hold it however. I suspect that would be noticed.
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Stucky
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Payne
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Take a glass milk bottle and paint it white on the inside so it looks like it's full of milk. fill this with chocolate milk. show the milk bottle and put it in a paper sack. Wrap the paper sack around the bottle so you can see its shape. Vanish the Chocolate. Then, without taking the bottle out of the bag pour it's contents into a glass. This method allows you use real chocolate milk.

Or use a mirror glass.

A lot of chemicals that work with changing colors in water won't work with milk because of its chemical makeup.
"America's Foremost Satirical Magician" -- Jeff McBride.
TheMightyRicardo
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Hi Payne,
Nice simple solutions to the problem.

Richard
nautimike
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I like the milk bottle idea. As long as I paint it full and use a bottle I can cap, I see this as a perfect solution!
Off to buy me a milk bottle today! Thanks.

I've noticed from experimenting that water works better than milk with changing colors. I have never used fake milk, but I ordered a bottle of Milk Tex to see if it maintains the properties that will allow the color to penetrate more effectively.

Quote:
On Jan 14, 2015, Payne wrote:
Take a glass milk bottle and paint it white on the inside so it looks like it's full of milk. fill this with chocolate milk. show the milk bottle and put it in a paper sack. Wrap the paper sack around the bottle so you can see its shape. Vanish the Chocolate. Then, without taking the bottle out of the bag pour it's contents into a glass. This method allows you use real chocolate milk.

Or use a mirror glass.

A lot of chemicals that work with changing colors in water won't work with milk because of its chemical makeup.
nautimike
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Here's what I've found out. Plasti Dip company only makes white in a 1 gallon container, but they do make a 20 oz. "tint your own" kit for $21.00 that starts with a clear base and has white you can add to it. It is non-toxic and about the right viscosity for swirling around the milk container to coat it. The manufacture suggests tinting with entire white container.

Since delivery is about 2 weeks, I am trying a toxic version in the mean time. Menards tinted and thinned an 8oz can of Rust-Oleum LeakSeal (flexible rubber coating). I'll let you know how it works.
Stucky
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You don't have to tint the whole can. I have some of that and it's absurd. You can just tint a small amount of the clear and hold onto the rest for when/if you need it. It's very handy stuff to have around.
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wunceaponatime
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Great ideas. Thanks

David
nautimike
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I really wanted to use a plastic milk jug instead of a glass bottle as it is more common in our area to see. I was unsuccessful in getting the plasti-dip to adhere well after several coats. Admittedly, I used the spray version, but should have seen similar results. I ended up using my original device I made which worked well. I was able to use Milk-Tex to simulate milk, and the properties of the water allowed the coloring to mix well. I spent a great deal of time getting the coloring where I wanted it, but it all worked out in the end.

I will be continuing my journey of finding the ultimate milk to chocolate milk production. I have another idea, and we'll see where it takes me.
TheMightyRicardo
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Hi Nautimike,
If you prefer a plastic milk jug, why not use a magic milk pitcher? Then you immediately produce the chocolate milk as you pour the milk into the empty glass. (Brown dye in gimmick)

Richard
nautimike
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I'm not sure I follow. If I want to use a plastic milk jug, where does the pitcher and glass come in?

Quote:
On Jan 26, 2015, TheMightyRicardo wrote:
Hi Nautimike,
If you prefer a plastic milk jug, why not use a magic milk pitcher? Then you immediately produce the chocolate milk as you pour the milk into the empty glass. (Brown dye in gimmick)

Richard
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Hi Nautimike,
A Magic Milk Pitcher is a milk jug with a gimmick so you can be seen pouring milk into a hat, shoe, paper bag etc. and the milk vanishes. It is a classic. I use it in my parlour show.
The gimmick will also allow you to apparently turn milk into another liquid. You could turn plain milk into chocolate milk as you pour it into an empty glass. You could even drink the chocolate milk.
Simple and effective with no toxic chemicals. Photo of mine below.

Richard

Click here to view attached image.
nautimike
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Has anyone seen or used a pixie glass?
Abbott has them for sale, and it looks like you could use two and as one glass of white milk disappeared, one glass of chocolate milk could appear.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?x-yt-cl=85......22579428
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dnarayan
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Hi Mike,

Sorry, I'm a bit late finding this - would be interested to hear what you ended up using.

I love Payne's painting solution - nice and simple.

A couple of other thoughts - if you're happy to leave it covered while pouring it, could you somehow dye it on the way out? i.e. using the fact that the liquid is moving to mix it?

Also, how long is the milk covered up for? Long enough for a temperature change? I wonder if you could use colour-changing ink in the milk.

David
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