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Theodore Lawton
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Maybe someone can educate me. What the heck happened to our production of food that some of it is so loaded with chemicals? How did we get to that point anyway?

It seems strange to me.

I understand the occasional preservative here and there, maybe even what we once considered "safe" coloring agents. Food storage is a problem that man has been dealing with as long as we've been around.

But creepin crud, how did it ever get to the point that we had to have the big backlash that we're seeing in society now with the organic movement, etc? What made people consider altering our food to such an extent? And why?

I was talking about this with someone recently and we are both puzzled since it seems more cost effective, to us, to put as few things into a food as possible; thereby saving on production costs, research, etc.

And now you have companies saying things like, "We're going to start putting less of these unpronounceable chemicals into your food!" Like they're suddenly doing us a big favor by serving us more natural things to eat.

Do any of you truly understand this or have any light to shed on it for me? I don't get it. Did we just do it because we could? Is it really cheaper to add all these chemicals to our food? What in the double aitch ee hockey sticks is going on? Smile
Payne
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This is hardly a new problem. Humans have been tinkering with their food for centuries. We've just gotten more efficient in doing it.

The idea that in the past we ate unadulterated fresh naturally processed food is largely a myth.

http://www.history.com/news/hungry-histo......-of-food

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Jungle
"America's Foremost Satirical Magician" -- Jeff McBride.
Theodore Lawton
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Okay. I see your point to a certain extent. That lead thing is pretty creepy- because of the lack of knowledge about lead by the people using it, but for the most part that first article listed pretty natural ways of trying to preserve food or mask the fact that it was spoiling. Spices, dirt, stones, chalk. Basically, whatever we had laying around.

I think it's kind of insane that as science moved forward there was seemingly little effort given to preserving some foods in as natural a process as possible. Or maybe there was and I'm just stupid. The level of chemical additives far exceeds what is necessary for preservation in many of our processed foods today it seems. Again, maybe not and I just don't get it. But if the goal is to save money and increase profits it seems like something got lost along the way.

And it seems some things aren't just added to keep food fresh, they are just there... for some reason. Texture maybe, I don't know.

Or, maybe the amount of chemicals in our food isn't even that bad and I'm believing the hype? I mean, I eat pretty natural and healthy at home, for the most part. I think. There aren't a lot of additives in the food I eat. But when I read articles about the same chemical used to make yoga mats being used to bake bread; when it isn't even necessary, I have to ask myself, why?

Maybe it's the Illuminati trying to kill us all? Smile lol! kidding

Thanks for the reply.
Theodore Lawton
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I just checked to see if I had green olives in the fridge for a salad I'm making this week. Of course I had to read the label since we're having this conversation. Part of it reads: may contain traces of anchovies, almonds and hazelnuts. Smile Smile

Nothing like multitasking some machinery.

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balducci
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Quote:
On Apr 26, 2015, Theodore Lawton wrote:
I just checked to see if I had green olives in the fridge for a salad I'm making this week. Of course I had to read the label since we're having this conversation. Part of it reads: may contain traces of anchovies, almonds and hazelnuts. Smile Smile

Nothing like multitasking some machinery.

My understanding is that they often include warnings like that when such products are being present anywhere in the facility. An employee may spend an hour in the anchovies section, say, then move to olives. It's not that any machines are necessarily multitasking, it is that employees moving about can have trace amounts of different products on their hands / clothes and those can be spread around.
Make America Great Again! - Trump in 2020 ... "We're a capitalistic society. I go into business, I don't make it, I go bankrupt. They're not going to bail me out. I've been on welfare and food stamps. Did anyone help me? No." - Craig T. Nelson, actor.
Theodore Lawton
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Ah! thanks for that!
landmark
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I was talking about this with someone recently and we are both puzzled since it seems more cost effective, to us, to put as few things into a food as possible; thereby saving on production costs, research, etc.

That assumption is wrong. It's more cost effective, for instance, to put all kinds of chemicals in bread to increase its shelf life; it's more cost effective to put high fructose corn syrup than cane sugar; it's more cost effective to dye supermarket meat red so that it will appear more appealing than the weeks old animal flesh it is.

The so-called "Wisdom of the market" is a myth. It may take generations for consumer knowledge to catch up with what is happening.
magicfish
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Quote:
On Apr 26, 2015, landmark wrote:
Quote:
I was talking about this with someone recently and we are both puzzled since it seems more cost effective, to us, to put as few things into a food as possible; thereby saving on production costs, research, etc.

That assumption is wrong. It's more cost effective, for instance, to put all kinds of chemicals in bread to increase its shelf life; it's more cost effective to put high fructose corn syrup than cane sugar; it's more cost effective to dye supermarket meat red so that it will appear more appealing than the weeks old animal flesh it is.

The so-called "Wisdom of the market" is a myth. It may take generations for consumer knowledge to catch up with what is happening.

Dye supermarket meat red? ...no.
Tom Jorgenson
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I don't understand how we've let our food chain corporations become so grubby and money-hungry that our chicken meat, nationwide, is actually toxic before it even gets to us. So toxic they tell us not to wash it under running water...the droplets would be toxic and all over your kitchen! How poisonous is that, exactly? And, great question, how did we get here?
We dance an invisible dance to music they cannot hear.
S2000magician
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I blame Michael Igor Peschkowsky.
LobowolfXXX
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You omnivores got it rough.
"Torture doesn't work" lol
Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

"...as we reason and love, we are able to hope. And hope enables us to resist those things that would enslave us."
Destiny
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On Apr 26, 2015, S2000magician wrote:
I blame Michael Igor Peschkowsky.


You and Mrs Robinson?
S2000magician
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Smile
Theodore Lawton
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Then I guess we could also blame Diane Sawyer. Behind every man...
magicfish
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On Apr 26, 2015, LobowolfXXX wrote:
You omnivores got it rough.

All humans are omnivores. From the most dedicated vegan, to the inuit elder subsisting solely on meat for decades. Omnivores both. Smile
landmark
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Quote:
On Apr 26, 2015, magicfish wrote:
Quote:
On Apr 26, 2015, landmark wrote:
Quote:
I was talking about this with someone recently and we are both puzzled since it seems more cost effective, to us, to put as few things into a food as possible; thereby saving on production costs, research, etc.

That assumption is wrong. It's more cost effective, for instance, to put all kinds of chemicals in bread to increase its shelf life; it's more cost effective to put high fructose corn syrup than cane sugar; it's more cost effective to dye supermarket meat red so that it will appear more appealing than the weeks old animal flesh it is.

The so-called "Wisdom of the market" is a myth. It may take generations for consumer knowledge to catch up with what is happening.

Dye supermarket meat red? ...no.

A bit of an exaggeration, but not much:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/con......101.html
silvercup
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Food is made for profit not nutrition.

A safe bet is invest in soy. It's in nearly everything mass produced in one form or another.
Having developed an allergy to it I became surprised how many things have it.
tommy
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Eat drink and be merry.
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

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S2000magician
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[quote]On Apr 27, 2015, magicfish wrote:
Quote:
On Apr 26, 2015, LobowolfXXX wrote:
You omnivores got it rough. /quote]
All humans are omnivores.

Lobo, of course, meant practicing omnivores.
LobowolfXXX
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Quote:
On Apr 27, 2015, magicfish wrote:
Quote:
On Apr 26, 2015, LobowolfXXX wrote:
You omnivores got it rough.

All humans are omnivores. From the most dedicated vegan, to the inuit elder subsisting solely on meat for decades. Omnivores both. Smile


Depends on what dictionary you own. Not according to Merriam-Webster.
"Torture doesn't work" lol
Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

"...as we reason and love, we are able to hope. And hope enables us to resist those things that would enslave us."
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