The Magic Caf
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » All tied up! » » Strait jacket with crossed arms (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Dorian
View Profile
New user
21 Posts

Profile of Dorian
Does anyone do, or can do, a strait jacket escape from an ungimmicked Posey with friction buckles, front and side arm straps, with their arms crossed instead of one on top of the other? Just wondering why you never see escape artists cross their arms. Or how about arms crossed behind your back?

Dorian
KingStardog
View Profile
Inner circle
2134 Posts

Profile of KingStardog
I think Mark Cannons lecture video covers that. You can check with Cannons to be sure. I don't own it.
...think not that all wisdom is in your school. You may have studied other paths,but, it is important to remember that no matter who you are or where you come from, there is always more to learn.
DavidEscapes
View Profile
Inner circle
I'm Special!
1003 Posts

Profile of DavidEscapes
I have done it. In practice. It's hard and I don't want to do it again. Smile

Crossed behind the back is a nice idea. I will give that a go when my shoulder is fully healed. I just had an operation on it and can't put my right arm behind my back properly as yet. But when I can that would be a great challenge. Good thinking Smile

David Straitjacket
David Victor - The artist formally (and still occasionally) known as David Straitjacket.

My Website
Add me on facebook
James Peters
View Profile
Veteran user
Romford, UK
385 Posts

Profile of James Peters
I must admit, I've never not crossed my arms when donning a straitjacket. Have I missed something?

Thanks,

James.
Dorian
View Profile
New user
21 Posts

Profile of Dorian
All the pictures I've seen of you, you have your arms one on top of the other (at least you can get to that position by moving your hand around your elbow) and not interlocked. What I mean is kind of hard to explain, but your arms end up kind of supporting each other and they block each others movement. Each hand should be resting inside the elbow of the opposite arm.

Dorian
James Peters
View Profile
Veteran user
Romford, UK
385 Posts

Profile of James Peters
Ah! Got it. Thanks!! Smile

It never occurred to me to interlink the arms like that! I will have a go at it!

James.
Stuart Burrell
View Profile
Veteran user
England
385 Posts

Profile of Stuart Burrell
James, it is what I inadvertantly ended up doing at the close-up competition...you know the results.
James Peters
View Profile
Veteran user
Romford, UK
385 Posts

Profile of James Peters
Ok, just tried this out.

I found that when I folded my arms the same way as I usually do, then interlock, it's a whole load harder.

But when I folded my arms the other way (opposite to what I normally would) then interlocked, it actually wasn't too bad.

That will take some getting used to, because it doesn't feel as natural!

James.
SANTINI
View Profile
Loyal user
SANTINI
293 Posts

Profile of SANTINI
Hi all,
The first time I ever saw or got a chance to try a Humane Restraint jacket was when I was 14 years old. At the time Humane did not manufacture a jacket with a crotch strap.

The guy who showed me the jacket, and who was also a magician and escapist, told me that the proper way he was instructed to put on a Humane jacket was with the arms folded or interlocked and with the arm strap then looped under the lowest back strap.

The first time I tried the escape this way it took me about 45 minutes to get out. The interlocked arms prevented me from pulling the jacket up and over my head. The guy was probably correct in his claim that this is probably the way early Humane Restraint jackets were meant to be applied because in this manner they were quite secure even without the crotch strap.

In time and with constant practice I got my time on this jacket done up in this way down to about 1 1/2 to 2 minutes. Regards, Steve Santini

As a side note regarding difficult jacket escapes,

I really do not do that many jacket escapes these days and I think the reason may be worth mentioning.

This late October I began to get quite a bit of pain in the right elbow. It was quite intense and would even shoot from my hand to my elbow when I would try to strongly grip things or rotate my arm at the elbow.

This is a real bummer for me because I am right handed and always tend to use my right arm as the one I would first force over my head when doing any sort of jacket escape.

Well, finally the pain got so bad that 4 weeks ago I went up to the hospital for an x ray. Once the film came back the doctor called me in and showed me the cause of the pain. It seems that I have a very nasty looking bone spur which has formed in one area of the ball joint of my right elbow. This thing is rather large and is hooked shaped like a rose thorn.

The doctor went on to ask me if I had ever fallen on that elbow or smashed it badly against anything hard. I informed him that I had not had any such injury but that I used that arm during when most of the force is applied when escaping from countless straitjackets during my career. The doctor said that the over exertion of the arm and the elbow had caused a calcification build up and the bone spur and that the repetative and punishing straitjacket escapes were what brought it on.

I'll bet it was the first and last time he will ever see an injury like this caused by such unusual means! They want me to go for surgery on it but they cannot guarantee that it will be back to normal if they do go in and try and correct it. A bad set of options for your truly. Live with the pain and do nothing or let them have a go at it and possible damage it more.

This is a tough one... Regards, Steve Santini
James Peters
View Profile
Veteran user
Romford, UK
385 Posts

Profile of James Peters
Steve,

That is indeed a tough decision. Let us know how it goes.

Best wishes,

James.
AJP807
View Profile
Special user
New York City
559 Posts

Profile of AJP807
Thanks for sharing that story Steve. I have a small spur on one of the vertabras in my lower back from an injury I suffered years ago working as a Paramedic. It has given me a lot of pain over the years but has not bothered me as of late so I mostly forgot about it. But I always live with that surgery question in the back of my mind. I'm sure you will make the right decision. I'll keep you in my prayers.
Best regards, Tony Parisi
SANTINI
View Profile
Loyal user
SANTINI
293 Posts

Profile of SANTINI
Hi,
Thank you James and Tony for your well wishes. It does indeed seem there are some long term injuries which can result from prolonged and intense escapology work.

This injury and thinking about what to do about it makes me think back to when I first started in escapes. Back then I used to habitually hang out at a magic store in Toronto known as "The Browser's Den of Magic".

While spending weekends in the shop I quickly came to reaslize that there was very little stock on hand of escapology props and equipment of any merit. Back in "the good old days" what was available to the art in that store consisted of the Abbotts chain shackle, a stupid thing called the "Zanadu Death Device", thumbcuffs, and a handcuff and shim combination.

Because of this limited product line I was forced to "go it alone" and use normal and non tricked items I got from hardware stores, locksmith shops, and police supply distributors. While working in this way built up skills I now have which I would not trade for the world, it also no doubt brought on many injuries and damage which at 40 years of age I am just now beginning to suffer from.

I certainly think that working with real props is a good thing but many of the people new to escapes can be happy that there are firms like the EARL and Cannons to save them from the physical abuse I had no choice but to subject my body to while performing with non gaffed devices.

Regards, Steve Santini
Kondini
View Profile
Inner circle
3609 Posts

Profile of Kondini
Hi Steve, this seems to be quite common with escapologists, now coming up to over 450 challenge escapes over the past three years damage to both shoulder joints required an MOT, the fault was my own with contracts to fulfill and hefty clauses if not fulfilled I found that working even with a slight discomfort a nessecity due to that show the day after tomorrow ,ment that continued damage was inevitable, a progression caused by not taking time to heal, such is showbiz. Two other showground performers are also in this trap, one a fire-eater is loseing his stomach lining and the other who works with large marroons his hearing,I shall see them both on the circuit again this year, it seems the love of what they do outways the resulting pain they have to suffer (The Show Must Go On, what pratt said that).Or we all have to suffer for our art (Another saying which may be true) As for the way to go surgery or not all I can say is both you and me have had a good run so maybe its time you gave it up and I took over your bookings !!!!!!!

*******************************************************
Who`s starting to feel better now then Steve ?
SANTINI
View Profile
Loyal user
SANTINI
293 Posts

Profile of SANTINI
You know Ken,
The funniest thing seemed to happen the moment I just read your e mail and you won't believe it. My right arm, which has been killing me all day just seemed to stop hurting. It's a miracle! Nah, just kidding. It still hurts like Hell.

When the other one goes you can have the bookings Ken.
Take care, Steve
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » All tied up! » » Strait jacket with crossed arms (0 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2022 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.03 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL