The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Nothing up my sleeve... » » A little English lesson needed (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

RiffClown
View Profile
Inner circle
Yorktown, Virginia (Previously Germany)
1579 Posts

Profile of RiffClown
I'm curious, American magicians (myself included) seem to use the English penny a lot even though it hasn't been "valid" currency in 30 years.

How often do English magicians use the "Old Penny"?
Rob "Riff, the Magical Clown" Eubank aka RiffClown
<BR>http://www.riffclown.com
<BR>Magic is not the method, but the presentation.
jmcgrath
View Profile
Regular user
Tomorrow I'll make another
147 Posts

Profile of jmcgrath
Even though I would never call myself an English magician – I’m Scottish you see, I never use an Old Penny. The main reason though is that the few routines that I do with coins I achieve with either silver dollars (Crowded Coins – Paul Wilson) or whatever coins I am given/have in my pocket.

If I had a spellbound routine then I guess that it might be a little different. Basically I think that it is an ugly coin – as are most of the old copper coins. The only exception is a Chinese coin as the hole in it makes it more unusual.

Regards,

John
John McGrath
Hannes
View Profile
New user
Germany
83 Posts

Profile of Hannes
Hi,
I have got no English penny and I'm on the lookout for something comparable to use in a spellbound routine. If you do not use English pennies, what do you use instead?
Hannes
Peter Marucci
View Profile
Inner circle
5389 Posts

Profile of Peter Marucci
One of the good things about being a Canadian (and there are MANY!) is that our $1 and $2 currency are now coins.
And reasonably sized coins, too, not dinky little things.
While the $2 coin (the twonie or toonie) is not quite as big as the U.S. half or old English penny, it is close and works well for palming.
The $1 (or loonie -- so called for the picture of the loon on its reverse) is only a bit smaller.
Being coins in current use give them some legitimacy over the defunct big English penny and the uncommon U.S. half dollar.
cheers,
Peter Marucci
showtimecol@aol.com
Brian Proctor
View Profile
Inner circle
Somewhere
2317 Posts

Profile of Brian Proctor
What are English pennies made with? Iron? Because I just purchased one a few days ago at my local magic shop and it got dirty and dingy really fast after a few uses. I cleaned it and then scrubbed it lightly with a toothbrush. A little while later I noticed it started to rust. Was this a real English penny or a cheap imitation?

I guess it's not an iron copy. I tried using a magnet to it. It seems to be just a regular old copper coin, then. But what could make it seem like it was rusting? It had an orange reddish color on the face. I don't know...

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I'm just full of ignorance. Smile
Darrin Cook
View Profile
Special user
621 Posts

Profile of Darrin Cook
Don't be so hard on yourself.

Brass and copper both have a new look and a tarnished look. It's a matter of preference as to which look you decide to use. The new US Sacagawea dollar also has a new, bright copper look and an aged, tarnished appearance.
The Pianoman
View Profile
Veteran user
Lliving in Scotland.
336 Posts

Profile of The Pianoman
Brian, it depends on the year of the coin... I think.

I have lots of Old Pennies and recently tried to clean some with brown sauce... I left them a bit too long and whilst most were perfectly clean, the others were green where all the copper coating must have burned off. So they were left black and horrible.

We live and we learn.

Regards Alan
dchung
View Profile
Special user
Montreal
616 Posts

Profile of dchung
Quote:
On 2002-06-25 05:43, Peter Marucci wrote:
One of the good things about being a Canadian (and there are MANY!) is that our $1 and $2 currency are now coins.
And reasonably sized coins, too, not dinky little things.
While the $2 coin (the twonie or toonie) is not quite as big as the U.S. half or old English penny, it is close and works well for palming.
The $1 (or loonie -- so called for the picture of the loon on its reverse) is only a bit smaller.
Being coins in current use give them some legitimacy over the defunct big English penny and the uncommon U.S. half dollar.
cheers,
Peter Marucci
showtimecol@aol.com



This is indeed one of the good things about being Canadian. There's a coin of suitable size for any trick I wish to do. But I'm biased. My non-magician friends really hate having to carry around 5 dollars in change.
trevorsmagic
View Profile
Regular user
The U.K.
186 Posts

Profile of trevorsmagic
I tend to use the English 10p for sleights as they are a bit smaller than the old English penny. They are good, and as they are in circulation, they don't look suspect to the specs. There... just my bit .....Trevor Smile
danny
View Profile
Loyal user
England
258 Posts

Profile of danny
I never use the old penny because I feel the audience might think it is a trick coin. I just stick to currecy that is in circulation.
Brian Proctor
View Profile
Inner circle
Somewhere
2317 Posts

Profile of Brian Proctor
Well, you could possibly make up a story about the coin, like your grandfather got it for you, and let them examine it to show them it's real. But whatever floats your boat. Smile
Gary Alford
View Profile
Regular user
175 Posts

Profile of Gary Alford
The £2 coin is great for magic. The same size as a 1/2 dollar, milled edges for easy palming and a normal coin to be using in the UK. Very flashy as well due to the gold and silver.
swamigimmick
View Profile
Regular user
England
187 Posts

Profile of swamigimmick
There are lots of similar sized US and UK coins.

The US quarter dollar is the same size as the UK 10 pence (and the old UK half-pence)

The US half dollar is the same size as the UK £2 coin (and of course the UK old penny).

Gary is correct that the UK £2 coin is very attractive as it is two colours - Gold and Silver and is a must for a US magician.

Regards,
Eric.

Here's a link to explain the old English coinage system: -

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A506350

and another on the history of the penny: -

http://www.magicpenny.org/engpennyhistory.htm

the link above will also answer Brian's question about what metal the penny is made from. It changed over the years so you'll have to make a note of date on the penny.

Regards,
Eric.
Corinius
Mentalist and Hypnotist

"You cannot teach a man anything, you can only help him discover it within himself." - GALILEO
Peter Marucci
View Profile
Inner circle
5389 Posts

Profile of Peter Marucci
If you have a concern about odd or exotic coinage, then go all the way and use something extreme and fit the story to it.
I do a Bermuda triangle routine, using Bermuda half dollars, which are the same size as the old English pennies and the U.S. half dollars.
And if you can't come up with a story line using Bermuda coins, they you just aren't trying! Smile
cheers,
Peter Marucci
showtimecol@aol.com
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Nothing up my sleeve... » » A little English lesson needed (0 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2020 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.16 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL