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IonGrey
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As I progress in magic, I find myself running out of steam when it comes to magic tricks that I can perform.
Learning the staples of the magic world such as double lifts and card control has led me to quickly pick up the tricks.

Some powerful tricks that I have mastered and learned are
1. Two card monte
2. Sealed with a kiss
3. Hand sandwich
4. Ambitious card routines

Now I feel like I'm running out of material and content. The tricks I aforementioned were taught to me for free.
As I have a decent budget of $100-$200, I'm looking to buy and experiment with new effects and tricks.
I have a performance coming up in a month and I want to spice it up with some new material. I love tricks that
make people question their existence. My passion for magic is fueled by the love of entertaining people and astonishing them.
The joys of being a magician are the reactions and experiences you can share. If someone can lead me on the right path, that would be
fantastic. I'm very into street magic, sleight of hand and mentalism.
Father Photius
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By a copy of Card College, if you like cards, or Royal Road to Card Magic. Or expand into some other area of magic like coins, spongballs, illusion, mentalism, etc. Books are inexpensive and you can learn a lot of tricks. Harry Lorayne's The Magic Book, or any of his books for great card tricks. Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic. Tarbell (you can buy it volume at a time) You have far from learned all there is to learn about magic.
"Now here's the man with the 25 cent hands, that two bit magician..."
Andy Young
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First off maybe you have mastered them, maybe not.

If entertainment is your goal then take effects from Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic or the Tarbell books and create an entertaining act with that.

Both of these will give you the spectrum of magic.
pmarzionna
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With $200 you can buy a ton of books, which will provide you with material for a lifetime. I recommend you to take a look at the pinned topic at the top of this forum for more details and suggestions. If you want to keep working only with cards, with $200 you can buy the complete set of Card College, by Roberto Giobbi, for instance. Or 2 to 3 volumes of Harry Lorayne's Classic Collection.
If you think you might be interested in more areas of magic, with this money you can buy the 8 books from Tarbell (if you buy used you can spend less than 200), or simply spend $15 in Mark Wilson's book.
Anyway, invest in books. You won't regret.
Dick Oslund
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Hello Ion~!
Welcome to our motley crew, from an old geezer who has about 50 years as a full time working pro., and 20 as a part time pro.


The Chinese have a "saying": "The journey of a thousand miles, begins with a single step."

You're just beginning!!!

Much of my working act (It made me a good living for 50 years.) is tricks and routines, that I learned from TARBELL.

Tarbell will introduce you to PRINCIPLES. It was first written in 1926, as a correspondence school course. The patter suggested is ARCHAIC! --Skim it, and then forget it!!! The presentations are a bit old fashioned, (HERE COMES THE "BUT"::::: You will learn BASIC PRINCIPLES that you can easily ADAPT.

TARBELL IS AN I N V E E T M E N T!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! THAT WILL PAY DIVIDENDS.

Card tricks are fine, but, there is more to magic than cards. Broaden your horizons1!!

Most of my show is sleight of hand oriented, or at least "hand magic" I don't use tubes, pans, boxes, etc. I've never been 'at liberty'.
SNEAKY, UNDERHANDED, DEVIOUS,& SURREPTITIOUS ITINERANT MOUNTEBANK
Dick Oslund
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P.S. There is much more involved in PERFORMING, than SLEIGHTS!!!!

Read, Ortiz's "STRONG MAGIC" and/or Ken Weber's "MAXIMUM ENTERTAINMENT". (Those are just two, there are more!

Basic rule: "It aint the PROPS or the SLEIGHTS! IT'S THE PRESENTATION! 0r, It aint WHAT ya do, it's HOW ya do it!"

Write THAT on your shaving mirror, and read it every morning!!

To add a new trick to your repertoire, there are THREE things NECESSARY:

1. Learn how it's DONE.

2. Learn how to DO it.

3, Learn how to DO it, so that it ENTERTAINS AN AUDIENCE!!!

--MAGIC is NOT INHERNTLY ENTERTAINING! Your personaity annd your PRESENTATION are the REAL SECRET.
SNEAKY, UNDERHANDED, DEVIOUS,& SURREPTITIOUS ITINERANT MOUNTEBANK
DaveGripenwaldt
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I second Dick Oslund's Tarbell recommendation. The breadth of information is HUGE, so it has to...like an old joke says...be approached the same way you eat an elephant: a little at a time. More than once I've seen a room full of magicians fooled by something straight of Tarbel, not to mention all the "original ideas" that pop up that were sitting in Tarbell decades ago.

And Dick's point is well taken...it's easy to dismiss material in Tarbel as dated and stuff that wouldn't play well today. But strip off the outer garments and underneath is enough excellent thinking, routine, ideas, props and gimmicks to keep you in material for years.
vannma
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I would like to add an additional twist to this conversation. While I surely value books and courses, I (think) I find myself in the same boat as our friend Iongrey. I have been away from magic due to an extended illness, but I am back now. I have been performing semi-professionally (bi-vocationally if you will) since 1998 and I have been involved in magic since I could hold a sponge ball in my hand (since the late '60's). During the past 40 years or so, I have seen many effects come and go. After being away for a while, I now want to see what the incredibly ingenious minds of today's magic have come up with. Hence my return to the magic café. I feel that our friend Irongrey is also searching in this way (maybe I am wrong). I love the "latest greatest" section to see what is coming out next. Magic has come a long way since the late 60's (and no, I have not been gone that long). So maybe we could help him (and me) out by suggesting other clever props/methods that are proven in the real world. I would also add to limit the list to effects he could master since his next gig is in a month.

...and before anyone says it, yes Tarbell (and other publications/courses) are great, no I do not know all of the Tarbell effects, and yes perhaps what he and I are looking for may be in Tarbell ect.

But I think he is looking for a little more help in a specific way...
funsway
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"Magic has come a long way since the late 60's" -- not necessarily in a good way.

'Proven in the real world" -- you mean for audiences with stunted imagination and limited attention span.

The fact that a trick sells well to newbies or gets a lot of likes on YouTube has nothing to do with it being good magic.

I am not sure what you are looking for at all -- "in a specific way." You offerings are anything but specific.

Please sate some effect you have performed for years before various audiences that no longer seems to produce a response of awe and wonder.

Why do you feel a need to find something different in a search for something better.

The Title here says "out of ideas" yet only discusses card tricks. The solution is obvious.
"the more one pretends at magic, the more awe and wonder will be found in real life." Arnold Furst



ShareBooks at www.eversway.com * questions at funsway@eversway.com
pmarzionna
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Vanna,

I believe I'm not qualified to answer your question, but you've raised an interesting point on IronGrey's question, that we've ignored so far. He has only one month up to his next gig, and he wants to learn new tricks to add to his gig. Considering that he just mentioned Card Tricks, I imagine that the only new effects that he would be able to add to a gig one month from now would be other card tricks, basically using similar methods/sleights. I don't know exactly what is this gig that he has next month, nor his skill level, but I wouldn't recommend him to add a complete new effect, in a different field of magic, in such a short notice. Anyway, I think most of our suggestions here are going to be useful for him beyond this one gig, guaranteeing that he never runs "out of ideas" in the next 60 or 70 years...

Best,

Paulo

Quote:
On Feb 4, 2016, vannma wrote:
I would like to add an additional twist to this conversation. While I surely value books and courses, I (think) I find myself in the same boat as our friend Iongrey. I have been away from magic due to an extended illness, but I am back now. I have been performing semi-professionally (bi-vocationally if you will) since 1998 and I have been involved in magic since I could hold a sponge ball in my hand (since the late '60's). During the past 40 years or so, I have seen many effects come and go. After being away for a while, I now want to see what the incredibly ingenious minds of today's magic have come up with. Hence my return to the magic café. I feel that our friend Irongrey is also searching in this way (maybe I am wrong). I love the "latest greatest" section to see what is coming out next. Magic has come a long way since the late 60's (and no, I have not been gone that long). So maybe we could help him (and me) out by suggesting other clever props/methods that are proven in the real world. I would also add to limit the list to effects he could master since his next gig is in a month.

...and before anyone says it, yes Tarbell (and other publications/courses) are great, no I do not know all of the Tarbell effects, and yes perhaps what he and I are looking for may be in Tarbell ect.

But I think he is looking for a little more help in a specific way...
motown
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I would suggest looking into the Magic of Aldo Colombini. Entertaining and strong magic that's perfect for someone starting out.
"If you ever write anything about me after I'm gone, I will come back and haunt you."
– Karl Germain
IonGrey
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Thank you for all the suggestions. I am really glad that the magic community is really helpful and open to newer performers.
One additional piece of information I want to add is that I am currently 17. That makes me naive to all the types of magic
there is. I know there is much more than just card magic. As I am still young, I found myself gravitating towards one
type of magic as a base for my magic career. I picked up card magic and quickly fell in love. I would like to expand my
knowledge and control of cards. I already have a basis for a routine revolving around Sealed with a Kiss and ambitious card.

As I find myself repeating the same tricks, I would like to figure out a way to tweak and add to my routine to give it more spice.
I would like to expand my arsenal of card tricks I can do regardless of if they require a gimmick or not.

For the gig in a month, I have to do a walking act. By that I mean I am just walking around entertaining people with tricks.
Doing the same 3-4 tricks isn't exciting to me. It also requires that I have to find a new audience every time because I don't
want to repeat the same tricks. I'm told that a magician should find a few tricks and master them. After proficiently doing the tricks,
I find that I can move on to NEW tricks and effects but I don't know what to look for. Will these books help appease my magic appetite?

I also learned that each magician should have their own special touch. I have looked into performance and found a niche for myself. I find
myself easily connecting with my audience but I occasional have problems dealing with crowd control. I would also like to learn to control the
mood of the crowd and stimulate reactions.
Dick Oslund
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The WISE PERFORMER realizes that when HE is getting bored with performing a trick, THAT is when he must also realize that, "when you stop getting better,
you start getting worse"!

Go back and read my post again!

The performer's aim MUST BE to ENTERTAIN THE SPECTATORS, N O T H I M S E L F !!! Otherwise, as we say in the business, he is just masturbating on stage.

In 70 years of performing (for $$$) I've presented, with just a few variations, THE SAME TRICKS! I knew those tricks so well that I COULD CONCENTRATE ON

THE P R E S E N T R A T I O N. I performed in thousands of HIGH SCHOOLS, from coast to coast, and border to border, and, got ENCORES and STANDING

OVATIONS.

Did you skip over what I said regarding how to add a new trick? IMHO, if you try to add new material with less than a month to do #3, you are very likely

to fall on your butt.
SNEAKY, UNDERHANDED, DEVIOUS,& SURREPTITIOUS ITINERANT MOUNTEBANK
funsway
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"For the gig in a month, I have to do a walking act. By that I mean I am just walking around entertaining people with tricks."

I guess this means no table and for a small group.

are they expecting tricks or magic? What is the purpose of the gathering? Why does the host want a wandering magician?

You also mention dealing with large groups as a challenge. So, I am not clear on what your objective is.

For many card effects a single spectator must serve as witness for the group. This is difficult for a group of strangers.

Yet, the host apparently knows you only do card tricks and may think thta is what his guests may like. If so, you don't need anything "new."

Ideally one should never plan on using an effect they have not mastered. Is a month long enough to search, practice and master?

If they can be mastered in a couple of days will they meet the expectations of the audience?

By extension, why did you accept a gig for which you were not prepared?

This may be the first opportunity for some in the audience to experience a good magic effect live. What story will they tell after?

So many things to consider beyond finding anew trick.
"the more one pretends at magic, the more awe and wonder will be found in real life." Arnold Furst



ShareBooks at www.eversway.com * questions at funsway@eversway.com
pmarzionna
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Quote:
On Feb 4, 2016, IonGrey wrote:

For the gig in a month, I have to do a walking act. By that I mean I am just walking around entertaining people with tricks.
Doing the same 3-4 tricks isn't exciting to me. It also requires that I have to find a new audience every time because I don't
want to repeat the same tricks. I'm told that a magician should find a few tricks and master them. After proficiently doing the tricks,
I find that I can move on to NEW tricks and effects but I don't know what to look for. Will these books help appease my magic appetite?



I would recommend you to keep working with the same 3-4 tricks for this gig, but you should definitely buy some of the books that we've recommended. If I might suggest, start with Card College vol. 1 (you'll probably review some techniques that you're already familiar with) and with Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic or The Magic Book by Harry Lorayne. You'll spend only 50 dollars, and you'll have a great introduction to the formal study of Card Magic (and you'll probably buy the following volumes in the future), as well as a good introduction to other areas of Magic.

Of course, you can still buy one or two packet tricks (e.g., color monte), but try to focus on the books, which will give you a solid basis for further development in magic...
JoeHohman
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IonGray, welcome to the community!

Do follow up on some of the advice you have received regarding Tarbell, the Mark Wilson book, and Harry Lorayne's "The Magic Book" -- you might also want to look into Harry's classic called "Close-Up Card Magic." This one assumes you are not a beginner, but it sounds like you'd be ready for it; there is a lot of strong, workable material in there.

If you pursue Tarbell (there are eight books in all, and each one is pretty big), do not be put off by the old-fashioned patter. Write your own patter. Don't dismiss the tricks in Tarbell just because you think the patter sounds too hokey or corny -- I myself am a fossil, and the patter sounds hokey and corny to ME! And this same advice will hold true for Royal Road to Card Magic as well -- jam-packed with great effects, but you will need to update the patter.

Don't let anyone tell you that you should study this for years and years before you consider performing in public. There are many sleight-of-hand giants who are unable to make eye contact with people; there are magicians who are merely competent at sleight of hand, but they know how to interact with people, they know how to (succinctly) tell a joke, and they know when to stop performing. Furthermore, the good ones know how to market themselves. These are the magicians the public remembers. Good luck!
Ed_Millis
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If you are looking for another trick or two to add with only a month until a gig, then I suggest you need new definitions of "master" and "entertain". Just because you can do a series of moves and make a specific outcome happen correctly does not mean you have mastered the routine, nor does it mean you are entertaining. Please seek to temper your youthful enthusiasm for the next greatest thing with a dedication to the entertainment value that takes time to develop.

Actually, repeating a set of three or four tricks all night long for different groups is excellent. You can begin to pick up patterns in their reactions and your rough spots. When they start bringing their friends up to you with " you just gotta see this", then you are beginning to master a routine.

Ed
Dick Oslund
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Very well said, Ed!

I didn't have the time or the patience to express the facts so well.
SNEAKY, UNDERHANDED, DEVIOUS,& SURREPTITIOUS ITINERANT MOUNTEBANK
IonGrey
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Quote:
On Feb 8, 2016, Ed_Millis wrote:
Actually, repeating a set of three or four tricks all night long for different groups is excellent. You can begin to pick up patterns in their reactions and your rough spots. When they start bringing their friends up to you with " you just gotta see this", then you are beginning to master a routine.
Ed


It seems the best thing to do is keep doing the same tricks I know and continue gradually getting better. I am just wondering how to prepare
for the situations you have mentioned. Often times, someone brings their friend and says " you gotta to see this" At what point do I stop
repeating the same tricks? For the new audience, they see the tricks for the first time. If people from the old audience have stuck around,
they see the same tricks over and over again. Do I just just perform my routine and move to a new audience? What is a solution to this problem?
Ed_Millis
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It's *not* a "problem"! How many people have seen Star Wars more than once? Yes, we are told not to give in to someone who begs "do that one again!" That's to deflect the people who just want to bust you, because the second time they'll put your hands under a microscope! In fact, that moment right there is when you break out the one they haven't seen yet. If they come find you with a friend, it will almost always be because you've given them a magical experience and they want to share it with a friend.

I don't do walk-around, but I have spent hours in a booth presenting to small groups. What I find works is a group of three - no more than four - routines. The last one is your powerhouse, and your first one involves more than one person. In the middle is where you put the one or two that need work. Keep a couple of back-ups close to hand, in case one isn't working out or you need an extra surprise.

If you really insist on getting something new (I do not recommend it, but if you must), you might look at Twisted Sisters. Easy enough if you've got some skills, and open to a variety of presentations if you go beyond the instructions.

Ed
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