The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » How do I scare away the little kids? (1 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

trampabroad
View Profile
New user
81 Posts

Profile of trampabroad
So we've been doing a show at a couple of local country clubs. We work pretty hard on the show and it's got a little of everything--saucy jokes for adults, some stuff for moody teenagers, and a few silk tricks for younger kids. Only one problem....

Every time we mention having a magic show, people think "Oh great, I'm gonna bring my five-year old!" The word "magic" literally makes people think "tiny kids." We just booked our first show at a new CC, and it's sold out--to parents with 5-6 year old children.

Now, I don't mind a few smaller kids in the show, but they're not the target audience. A room full of four-year-olds requires a kids' show We do have a different show, written for small children, which we do for birthday parties and such. It is not the same show.

So I guess this is a branding problem. How do I advertise a show to say--nicely--that it's not (just) a little kid's show? Likewise, how do I avoid turning off older kids/adults? (Magic? pfft--I'm too old for that)
ibm_usa
View Profile
Special user
In Your Mind, Ky, USA
722 Posts

Profile of ibm_usa
How are you marketing your act? What do the venues see in your marketing material?
From my personal experience with working with the theatres around here - if I don't want audiences of a particular age group - I simply put "For Mature Audiences Only" or " Some Material Not Suitable For X (enter age range).
I tell people straight up that what I do isn't meant for young children. I have no problem with late elementary - middle school, I've had luck with 5 year olds but as mentalist I don't see things going over well for younger crowds.
"You may think that i only talk of things from the past, you know, history, well magic is history"

-Guy Jarrett

"Curiosity isn't a sin Harry, but it should be exorcised with great caution."

-Albus Dumbledore (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire)
http://www.jordanallen-mentalist.webs.com/
WitchDocChris
View Profile
Inner circle
York, PA
2422 Posts

Profile of WitchDocChris
Agreeing with ibm_usa - Most likely the marketing isn't being clear about it not being suitable for certain ages.

Like it or not, "magic" is a word that is associated with kids birthday parties. Some areas more so than others - in Fresno if I ever said I was a magician folks automatically translated that to "clown" due to the unusually high number of clowns in that city.

Out in this region (I'm in PA now) the perception is a bit different but folks still expect a classic magician if I say "magic" anywhere in my marketing.
Christopher
Witch Doctor

Psycho Seance book: https://tinyurl.com/y873bbr4
Dannydoyle
View Profile
Eternal Order
20019 Posts

Profile of Dannydoyle
I think to blame it on geography misses the point.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
trampabroad
View Profile
New user
81 Posts

Profile of trampabroad
Thanks for your comment.

Most of our marketing is done through the country clubs themselves--we provide the posters, and they send them through their networks and such. We're a reasonably large expat community in a giant city. Since most of the social life revolves around alcohol, it's kind of expected that families will look for any entertainment they can get.

I suppose we could put in a parental warning or something.
Mindpro
View Profile
Inner circle
9761 Posts

Profile of Mindpro
I agree. The key point to be taken here is the words "Magic Shows" and "Magician" without any proper context, to most people they automatically think of kids party magician. Regardless if right or wrong it just is. The problem is then to change this perception some will use the term "Illusionist" which is usually wrong unless of course you have a large illusion show, which most don't.

So it's a matter of using the words in the proper context. Context can mean many things including the actual venue. If it's a comedy club and you read comedy magic show, you automatically think adult show (or over 18) because of the venue. When having a mobile show as yours in a non-traditional venue, you have to make the extra effort to crate the proper context and positioning. One way this can be done is with your wording. Terms like Family Magic Show can be a bit more all encompassing but I wouldn't stop there. I'd include a descriptive liner, burst or bullet points clearly stating "tweens, teens, adults and seniors...even something for smaller kids too." Deliberately downplay their automatic default by offsetting it with your specific message. Then, if you choose you can add the part at the end to establish this is relay something for all family members and ages. DON'T just use a simple term like "All Ages Show", people do not know what that means in the exact sense you are trying to state, they will still hear "kids show, but others can stay too."

Also another way is to establish your message subconsciously or more indireclty. Another way to do this is by using proper photos. Every photo used in a sign, poster or website should have a specific purpose and reason (more than just "I like that photo of me"). Use teens, adults, moms and dads and even seniors or grandparents in your photos. If you have an onstage photo with several ages of family members different ages), use it. If you use a photo with a bunny, people will think kids. Get it?

There are many other ways to establish this too, such as USP, descriptive liners and positing statements, and having a specific website for this demographic rather than a general all-purpose website. Also play to the country club mindset and mentality. I hope this helps.
Bill Hegbli
View Profile
Eternal Order
Fort Wayne, Indiana
22240 Posts

Profile of Bill Hegbli
It is true, a picture is worth a thousand words. I once used a flyer showing my picture in a suit and holding playing cards, the mistake I made is the flyer had drawings of rabbits on it. Thus I got calls for children shows. The next year I changed to poster designed with line drawings, and a picture of a golf club floating.

This got me more adult banquet shows.
Vietnam Veteran 1967, Sgt. E-5

Graduate of Chavez College of Prestidigitation and Showmanship

"Magic With A Twist Of Comedy"
Stephen Wilbury
View Profile
New user
68 Posts

Profile of Stephen Wilbury
It's the same wth juggling, people think kids show. Have a hard look at your pictures and how you're presenting yourself maybe.
Dannydoyle
View Profile
Eternal Order
20019 Posts

Profile of Dannydoyle
It has everything to do with how they hear about you and where. It has to do with how you present it.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
ibm_usa
View Profile
Special user
In Your Mind, Ky, USA
722 Posts

Profile of ibm_usa
Quote:
On May 24, 2016, WitchDocChris wrote:
Agreeing with ibm_usa - Most likely the marketing isn't being clear about it not being suitable for certain ages.

Like it or not, "magic" is a word that is associated with kids birthday parties. Some areas more so than others - in Fresno if I ever said I was a magician folks automatically translated that to "clown" due to the unusually high number of clowns in that city.

Out in this region (I'm in PA now) the perception is a bit different but folks still expect a classic magician if I say "magic" anywhere in my marketing.

I have no problem doing demonstrates for kids who are old enough to get it - but the association is the reason why I stress venues I'm performing for to never mention "magician" with my name not just because that isn't what I do (I'm a mentalist and a purist to the highest degree) but because I don't want that association. I don't want what I do to get muddled in with what magicians do. I don't make a living doing tricks, I don't want to be associated with trickery - I want to be emotionally and intellectually connected with my audience and I want the audience to feel that connection.
Magician = tricks sad to say it but it is true. There are way too many bad magicians out there that have ruined it for everyone.
"You may think that i only talk of things from the past, you know, history, well magic is history"

-Guy Jarrett

"Curiosity isn't a sin Harry, but it should be exorcised with great caution."

-Albus Dumbledore (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire)
http://www.jordanallen-mentalist.webs.com/
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » How do I scare away the little kids? (1 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2020 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.22 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL