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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Table hoppers & party strollers » » Tricks and flow (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

xtreme_mixers
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How would one put a set of tricks to do table magic together i.e how they flow into each other and how to approach a table (sorry I got my first table job on april 10th) any help greatly needed thanks
Matthew 7:5
You hypocrite, first take the plank out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother's eye.
carlomagic
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Hello there,

I have read differing opinions with regards to whether tricks actually need to 'flow' or not. Each trick having a beginning, middle and end seems straightforward, but as far as I am concerned it is not essential for each trick to link seamlessly into the next one.

I think of my routines in terms of effect. Whether kids show or close-up and table, I start with the biggest gasp-getter I have, then use a variety of effects that build to a finale that will leave a lasting impression in the minds of those who witness your work. I think those principles are pretty much universal.

I hope that is of some use. Let me know how you get on...

Regards,

Carlo
MacGyver
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Sorry, but I would turn the job down....

If you don't know "how to aproach a table", then you aren't ready to do magic at tables.


Perhaps you are an accomplished stage magician that got hired for tablehopping.... Take Scott Guinn's Advice and turn the job down!!!


Don't take on a job that you aren't prepared for!

If you are dead set, start working on things NOW!!! I would find a place to practice close-up magic and start approaching people until you get comfortable with it.
carlomagic
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Quote:
On 2004-03-17 06:18, MacGyver wrote:

Don't take on a job that you aren't prepared for.



Good advice MacGyver,

Amongst other things, if you aren't fully prepared you are likely to feel very nervous and appear underconfident and unprofessional. It is a brave step, and experience will always be of benefit, but really prepare what you are going to do in detail.

One piece of advice that helped me was from 13Steps in the interview section - Write a script, learn it, practice it, and allow it to become part of your natural patter. It helped me with professional delivery and 'patter', and although I was a naturally confident person anyway, it took away the remains of nervousness that I had before performing to an audience.

Confidence in what you are doing is so important. If you don't feel ready; if all eventualities aren't catered for, then MacGyver's advice is the best there is.(Although something always tends to pop up mid-act that I haven't thought of!!)

Good luck,

Carlo
xtreme_mixers
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Thanks Carlo
Quote:
On 2004-03-17 06:18, MacGyver wrote:
Sorry, but I would turn the job down...

how can I progress and become a table magician if I turn the job down? I can perform very well and have good patter (continuing on patter though) but never done table magic. I just needed the views and approach to it I think it would help to steady nerves as well.
Matthew 7:5
You hypocrite, first take the plank out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother's eye.
Mr. Ed
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Well I sortof disagree here. There are variables we may not be aware of.

How did you get this gig?
What are the expectations of the customer?

There are some venues where it is appropriate to cut your teeth, and some that are not. If you are going into a restaurant, without exception I say pass on it. You are not ready. If you look bad then they will look bad. If it is a friends party or banquet or other relaxed environment, then let the customer know your concern and level of competancy and let them make the decision.

Never represent yourself as something that you are not sure you are. If you represent yourself as you are and let them know your inexperience and audition for them, then they can make the decision and you won't dissapoint them.

If they are looking for a more professional person, then refer them to someone in your area. This will make the customer happy, the magician you got work for happy, and should give you a good reputation with both. This type of behavior does not go unnoticed or unrewarded.

Now where to "cut your teeth"?

Approuch bars or happy hours and explain your situation and what you looking to do and offer them a lower rate for a trial basis. Approuch fraternaties or college houses and offer to stroll at their parties. Both of these last ones are very difficult, but good experience.


That said, remember, if you know everything you need to know to do a job, they couldn't afford you to do the job.
He who laughs, lasts.
Mike Walton
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Congratulations on the gig.

Eugene Burger talks about approaching a table in Gourmet Close Up Magic. You can find some information there, and see how his effects flow together to become a routine as his specialty is restaurant magic. It's a great video and teaches some outstanding effects as well that will build out your table/bar/restaurant routine. Real Secrets of Close Up Magic by the same magician also has some great magic that may help plus Burger gives you an idea of how to frame an effect, which may help with the flow. I was very impressed with both of those videos and they took my skills up a big notch in both of the areas mentioned.

As was mentioned earlier, confidence is key not only to your own personal success and enjoyment as a performer but also to the spectator's enjoyment. Their trust and openness to you and your magic comes from your confidence, poise and presentation. Of course, this only comes from presentation so it sounds like you're plugging along.

Check some of the topics listed in the Café. I faintly remember some good insight about approaching a table. Good luck with the gig.
xtreme_mixers
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Well these have all been helpfull but I'm taking the job its in a club I'm familiar with and I don't have a problem performing and practicly never look bad in performance I just want advic on a aproach to a table that was all but these replys have opend a few thoughts for me so that's been helpfull thanks guys.

Special thanks to jive-turkey for congradulating me as he was the only one cheers m8.

GB xtreme
Matthew 7:5
You hypocrite, first take the plank out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother's eye.
p.b.jones
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How can I progres and become a table magician if I turn the job down I can perform very well and have good patter (continuing on patter though)but never done table magic I just needed the views and approach to it I think it would help to steady nervs aswell.

Hi,
Well first you put together several effects that are your strongest/most entertaining script your patter including what you say between effects and your introduction /parting words and then you REHEARES them as an act this is what will give your act the flow when you have done this many times (much more than you practice the individual tricks) try the act on some friends or associates teak it as required through repeated performances then when you are really comfortable you are ready to "progres and become a table magician " perhaps for free or little pay until you have honned the act
Phillip
twistedace
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Hey man, congrats. I think you should do the job regardless. The only way to actually get better at table hopping or anything in magic for that matter is to actually DO IT. Plus it's free advertisement. You may get other jobs from this job. My introduction is very sincere. I introduce myself and what I do there...I don't force magic on anybody who doesn't want it. You'll get in the groove after about an hour your first night...you'll see. Whoever is telling you NOT to take the job is nuts...don't want to present yourself as something you're not? I know that I would present myself as whatever it takes to get the job....how about everyone else? I know I'm not the only one who "expands the truth" to get certain gigs. It's all about confidence in the approach and be dressed a notch above what you believe everyone else will be wearing. I tend to always wear a suit.
MacGyver
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Do it for free at other places: charities, hospitals, retirement homes, wherever to get some practice in.

You can't start getting jobs until you've "paid your dues".


"Plus it's free advertisement."

I would be worried about the kind of advertisement offered at your very first table job.


I think you should PRACTICE and learn how to do routines and tables BEFORE YOU ACCEPT A JOB!!!!


That's like saying, "I'm never going to become a good brain surgeon unless I just jump right in surgery and start hacking away at a brain... after a couple attempts I'll have it down better"....
xtreme_mixers
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P.B.Jones twistedance Macgyver and jive-turkey you've been the best help I am getting a new flow of my strongest hitters and testing it on my family when I'm comfortable I'll hit people on the streets with it to test the waters (I don't mean throw things at passers by lol Smile)cheers guys been great.
Matthew 7:5
You hypocrite, first take the plank out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother's eye.
MacGyver
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Awesome!!!

Really, approaching a table isn't THAT different from approaching a circle of people. The difference is the choice to sit!!!!

You have like 3 weeks, that is plenty of practice time to get all your patter and presentation down pat, and plenty of time to work on your approach.


Now go out there and put in some practice time approaching real people at real tables!!!
carlomagic
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Hello there,

I hope all goes well for you and I am sure you will love the experience. There was great advice about what to wear - dressing up in a smart suit certainly has an effect for my own confidence and makes a great impression too - and I am sure you know anyway but for the sake of it I will add - have super-clean everything: Nails, shoes etc. It sounds really obvious, but I have seen one or two children's shows with a magician that looked like he had just crawled out of a back street (although it could have been part of the act I suppose!)

I am no expert, I merely speak from experience, and I hope the advice was helpful. On reflection, if you feel confident enough (which you obviously do!) you should never turn a job down and perform everywhere and anywhere you can.

Best regards,

Carlo
illuzns
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Hey xtreme-
I congradulate you also. But I think you need to accept this thing as it is.You will perform whether or not anyone here tells you to or not. Youobviously have a love for the art of magic.And I would do the same in your situation. You've already told them you'd do it and that's fine. The only thing you can do now is to prepare yourself for it. If this means that you sit down and go over your routines endlessly for days and days on end to prepare for it, then that is what you must do. That being said, lets get back to the original question at hand:
How do you prepare the "Flow" of your table magic?
Well, I would agree it would be wise to do your best and most well rehearsed tricks. You won't need an overwhelming amount of stuff to perform as you will more than likely be performing for different groups throughout the night.
I begin with Rocky the raccoon and have him do a couple simple stupid tricks/Gags and say "His tricks aren't that good, but mine are better...wanna see one of mine?"then just go right into my normal close up material.
I myself, start with something simple,but impressive.
Crazy mans handcuffs works nicely.After the trick, I then say "Rubber band magic was always fun, but not nearly as much fun as money magic... everyone loves money magic..." I then proceed to show them a coin trick.
You really don't need to have a "Flow" of one trick to the other literally, just a logical connection for introducing the next trick. It's just like a conversation. We're talking about magic right now. I wouldn't suddenly ask you about something totally out of context in the next sentence right? Just give it a logical reason for being introduced and go into the next trick.
You gotta start somewhere....
Remember...If at first you don't succeed,
then failure just might be your thing. Smile
Take care and good luck.
your friend in magic,
Illuzns
Mike Walton
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Regarding approaching a table, I remember Burger noting that it will be awkward no matter how much experience you possess. Rather than approach their table, turn their fork into a magic sceptre and hope you can continue with your routine, he recommends just to note that you're the magician and ask if they would like to see something completely astounding. He mentioned he was slammed once as he started into his routine, and the table didn't want any magic. The situation was extremely awkward and embarrassing and it was a lesson he's remembered ever since.

It's hard to compare, but I do bedside magic at a hospital and I tell the patient I'm the house magician, which is BS but all of a sudden that makes me part of the hospital rather than an outsider. Rather than me being this guy who is doing something not normal at a hospital, it makes my work part of their stay and the same could be beneficial in a restaurant, at a table, etc.

Finally, and I don't do this enough, put on that big, natural, relaxed smile before you approach the table. It's so important as it shows confidence and poise, and lowers their guard a bit. I just forget to do it sometimes and realized this week that I don't think about it and that I need to add it to my checklist so I can make a conscious effort before I step in front of a spectator.

Tell us how it goes.
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