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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The Good News! » » Gospel Magic for Teens (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Andini
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Columbus, OH
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I know a lot of the gospel magic performed is performed for elementary school-age kids. And while I think that it's important for that age group to grasp the basics of their religion, I think that getting a hold of a solid faith is more important for the high-school age.

Have any of you done magic for the teen age group? What do you have to do differently than younger kids? What messages do you share and how?

I'm really looking forward to your feedback.
-Andy Smile
drkptrs1975
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North Eastern PA
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Basically the same thing. Not that much of a difference. Same Rope Tricks, and Card tricks, as well as some Math Tricks and handkerchief tricks as well.
Rob Johnston
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I have done many presentations for the teen age group and have had GREAT success. I recommend trying it out. You get some great reactions if you are a good performer.

They love cards and coins ecspecially.
"Genius is another word for magic, and the whole point of magic is that it is inexplicable." - Margot Fonteyn
BroDavid
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A lot of my audiences are high school and young college teens.

I find that they like just about anything that will fool them.

They especially like fire and D'lites and anything "in your face" type of effects where you fool them up close. My 3 ring routine is one that gathers crowds of teens, and often has them leaving only to gather others to bring back and "See this".

And Astinus makes a good point. They will like everything you do, if you do a good job. But if you slip up, or are not confident as a performer, they will eat you alive.

BroDavid
If you stand for nothing, you will fall for anything.
Jon Gallagher
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Elmwood, Illinois
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I do an awful lot of "after-prom" parties this time of year and one thing I've found about performing for teenagers: DO NOT CHALLENGE THEM.

Get them on your side. Knock their socks off, but whatever you do, do not go in with a chip on your shoulder. That's when they'll eat you alive.

I've learned that if I go in, start strolling and do some simple, knock your socks off magic (sponge rabbits, believe it or not, is VERY popular) and get them to like me. That way, if someone comes up later who wants to call me out on certain effects, the rest of the kids come to my rescue. It's happened more than once.

The key: Get them on YOUR side.
www.jongallagher.com

Hey! I'm finally a Dot Com!
Andini
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Jon, I see what you're saying...sort of. Could you give an example of a routine and how you present it so that they're on your side? Also, explain what you mean by not "challenging" them, please.

Thanks for the awesome response already, though. You've all got some great points.
Jon Gallagher
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I guess it's more of an attitude thing. I've seen magicians go in with the attitude of "I'm better than you and you're not going to figure this out." That attitude will kill you.

I guess the best example I can come up with is a chop cup routine I do. I start with a couple of real corny jokes, then do some very subtle moves. Sometimes even I'm wrong about where the little red ball is at which makes them laugh (of course I know where it is all the time, but they don't know that).

I know of one magician up your way who just takes himself way too seriously. He never pokes fun at himself and he's trying to make the audience believe that he's doing "real" magic. David Blaine might be able to get away with it, but this guy ain't no David Blaine. And because of that, the kids burn his hands and TRY to catch him. He told me he'd never do another show for teens again. That's fine; I'll take the shows. Smile

Last year at a Prom, I did Deep Astonishment. We joked about it all the way through, chanting the "magic" word, and just goofing around with it. At the end, when I pulled out their magic word, there wasn't a jaw that wasn't on the table. I knew what kind of climax I was going to get, but I didn't get cocky about it, before OR after. Two of the teenage guys (GUYS!) went running up to the principal. "DUDE! You shoulda seen what he just did!" I think it was as successful as it was because of my attitude rather than my patter or my handling of the effect.

Hope this helps.

-Jon
www.jongallagher.com

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BroDavid
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Well said Jon!

When I said that you had better be confident, I didn't mean cocky. And Jon's explanation in his post really said it correctly.

You need to work WITH them. You cant get cocky, or show them up. And I try never to make my audience (young or old) the brunt of the joke, or the "victim". When that is necessary for the effect, I am one that takes the "hit". But they love it when you elicit their help, and let them take the bow.

BroDavid
If you stand for nothing, you will fall for anything.
Rob Johnston
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Yes...get them on your side. I never realized that, but when I think about it, that is why I have success. Be their friend, not enemy.
"Genius is another word for magic, and the whole point of magic is that it is inexplicable." - Margot Fonteyn
Mario Morris
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Mario Morris
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Hi,
I work a lot with teens from rough backgrounds as part of church outreaches, high unemployment, burgerly and car theft is admired.
I find hard hitting magic, Guillotines, Escapes and stunts get their full attention. You've got to earn their respect in the first seconds of meeting them; you can't hide behind your magic with these teens. If they know that you take them seriously, they will sit up and listen.
I do use a lot of comedy and I will build up to a finish if I am doing a show.
So it could be something like rope magic to start. I will then do my cup and ball routine, as I talk about choices we make in life and there is only one way and that's God's way... or I might share my story, which is hard hitting to some. My cup loads blow them away, every time I produce six orenges and a mellon from under my hat (Gazzo Style, God's Patter) Which will lead me to the Head Guillotine.

Where I talk about "why one does not know God" is that we live for the big number one. The Bible teaches this is sin and it separates us from God. Then I talk about Jesus' ministry using a metaphor between the Cross and my guillotine. Here I lay the message of the Cross on thick and hard. If all goes well my volunteer will survive and return to their seat, which enables me to complete the message with the resurrection.
Some of my shows are bigger and longer but from my experience, my build-ups may be the same but my finish will be different for children.
I hope that helps
Mario
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