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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Ever so sleightly » » Ambidextrous training for cups and balls (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

BlindWizard
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Is it worth the time to try and learn a trick or slight both left and right handed with the cups and balls. Or can it be done. If not how do you know what hand to use because new slights feel shaky and uncomfortable either way.
jakeg
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"I'd give you right arm to be ambidextrous."
Actually, about a year ago I was hit with a pretty bad case of arthritis. Sometimes it would only effect one hand, sometimes both hands. For almost 6 months I couldn't close my hands tight enough to finger palm a small enough ball. I set out to learn the C&B moves so I could do it with either hand. I'm not finding it terribly difficult, although still prefer using my right hand. Right now, I cant hold a ping pong ball in my left hand without the use of my thumb. Fortunately neither thumb is effected.
Dick Oslund
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Ah! --The "Golden Years"!

Our minds are still functioning, eh Jack!

I learned the Downs palm when I was 15, from an old carnie. I could do it with both hands (5 coins--each hand). I learned Magrum's Five Coin Star, at 18 (both hands) I could do the "spring" or Cascade "shuffle" with a spread of 18". (I have an 8 x 10). I could do the coin roll with four coins simultaneously (only right hand).

Now, I can barely get a 12" spread, with the cascade. I can "fumble" the Downs. The Star, I can do once in awhile. The coin roll with one coin, and some days a couple.

When I was working, I did 350-400 school shows (45 minutes) for fifty years. Now, when I do 15--20 minutes, my back hurts.

In six weeks, the birthday cake will have 85 candles.

Ah! The "Golden Years"!
SNEAKY, UNDERHANDED, DEVIOUS,& SURREPTITIOUS ITINERANT MOUNTEBANK
NotThatLarson
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Its actually easier to learn the sleight for the second hand because you already learn how the mechanics work. And once you learn with the other hand , you will have a deeper understanding for the slieght itself.
BlindWizard
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I've been working on shuffles both left and right handed the over hand and the riffle Shuffle and the controls associated with both I have found it makes me focus on the mechanics and smoothness of each Shuffle more because I'm having to slow down considerably. I'm hoping this extra time will make it better wizard in the long run.
ROBERT BLAKE
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I think it is good to tru to learn it both hands. your tevhnical skill will develop. it also give you advantage when you van do it with the other hand. you do not have to do it but when exploring new ways it is good to it. I play around with the 3 shell game and sometimes I do the game with my left hand and then right hand. the same pattern but different look and result.
BlindWizard
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I need to find a book with the three shell game in it I think it would help me with the C&B. I already practice C&B left and right handed. It helps with understanding the movements more closely I believe.
Tom Fenton
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Leeds, UK (but I'm Scottish)
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I practiced the drummer's wand spin and the Silent Mora/Vernon wand spin with both hands.
Strangely, even though I am right handed, I can do them better using my left hand.
"But there isn't a door"
BlindWizard
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Quote:
On Nov 5, 2016, Tom Fenton wrote:
I practiced the drummer's wand spin and the Silent Mora/Vernon wand spin with both hands.
Strangely, even though I am right handed, I can do them better using my left hand.

Aren't the drummers wand spin and the Mora/Vernon wand spin the same?
BeThePlunk
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West of Boston, East of Eden
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I think there's plenty of proof that people can learn to do things with their off hand (look at how accident victims re-learn), but you have to accept that it takes concentrated work to strengthen new pathways from brain to muscles. I taught myself to do Al Schneider's C&B steal with both hands simultaneously.
Tom Fenton
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BlindWizard,

The drummer's wand spin only uses the fingers.
The Silent Mora/Vernon wand spin uses the fingers and the wrist.
"But there isn't a door"
ROBERT BLAKE
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The advantage of doing it both hands is that of an audience susspect something you can throw them off by doing it with the other hand.
AndreOng1
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SIngapore
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Quote:
On Nov 6, 2016, ROBERT BLAKE wrote:
The advantage of doing it both hands is that of an audience susspect something you can throw them off by doing it with the other hand.


haha, I totally do this every once in a while.
TheAmbitiousCard
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IMO the best way to learn anything that requires something new ..such as a skill with the other hand is to learn and perform a trick that requires it.
www.theambitiouscard.com Hand Crafted Magic
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HenryleTregetour
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As someone fairly new to magic, I am having the same issue as the original poster.

First, in line with the original poster, I would appreciate it if people could relate their experiences with the problem of "handedness," ie. did they and how did they overcome the problem, is there anyone who pretty much performs cups and balls with just one active sleight hand, etc.

Second, to relate my own experience: As I write with my left hand, one could say I am "left-handed." However, ambidextrous would be a better description for me, as there are things that I can do with one hand and not the other. For instance, I use scissors with my right hand, but it is very difficult for me to use them with my left hand. So, for me being "ambidextrous" does not equate to being able to doing things with both hands; rather, I can do some things with one hand and other things with the other hand. (Yes, I am stating the obvious.)

Now with regards to my handedness and sleights, I find that using my right hand as the active hand for sleights is natural. For instance, I have been practicing the French drop, and when my right hand holds the ball it feels totally naturally. However, when the left hand holds the ball, I am fumble fingers.

Of course, a person who is able to do sleights with either hand will be a far better magician than one who only able to execute sleights with one hand. So last night when I was playing with my cup and balls (no pun intended)I did quite a bit of practice with my left hand. I also developed a drill which I think any new person would find helpful, but I will comment on that later.

So, I have stated the issue as I see it. I would appreciate any help that others might offer.

Thanks,

Henry
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