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Leo H
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I want to see your list of the percentages of these words shared between Gallaway and Erdnase. Sanders shared all these words:

contrivances
longitudinal
vocation
axiom
curriculum
post-graduate
culled
countenance

I doubt that you can produce this list of shared percentages--and you still haven't after asking you several months ago.

This is your best example of Gallaway's French? misnomer, nonpareil, homilies, bourgeoise.

Evidently he fell asleep in his high school foreign language class.


Both Sanders and Erdnase mimic dialectical speech, accents, and various colloquialisms. Feel free to post here when you can locate examples of Gallaway's vernacular writing.

Erdnase:
A colored attendant of a club-room, overhearing a discussion about running up two hands at poker, ventured the following interpolation: Don't trouble 'bout no two han's, Boss. Get yo' own han'. De suckah, he'll get a han' all right, suah!

Sanders

and dormitzer as coxswain, with his lurid "langwidge" free
how in the name of "Heavings" did columbia...pasht th' nowlidge av the saints.
(stockholders lafin' fit ter kill when you got down ter biz);
We see you slayin' Mexic's sons with seven-foot machetes,...[more, in Dwight bio]
an event occurred that was so "amoosin'" that it has stuck in the minds...
he is not married but 'as 'opes
and faseeshusly smileth his smisle...for to sin till late once in a whisle
if half they say is true, B'GOSH, THE GAME IS UP, B'JINKS!
the while the BLOOMIN' octopi..
all this BLOOMIN' coil
of one, the fiercest of them all, YELEPT YE standard oil
the Divvil's own crew
lith'rachure -- in but one minnit ... that contains a sthick to lick wid;
Chris
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Quote:
On Jun 2, 2018, Leo H wrote:
I want to see your list of the percentages of these words shared between Gallaway and Erdnase. Sanders shared all these words:

contrivances
longitudinal
vocation
axiom
curriculum
post-graduate
culled
countenance

I doubt that you can produce this list of shared percentages--and you still haven't after asking you several months ago.

Why does Gallaway have to share exactly these words? Most of them aren't very rare to begin with. In my post before I gave you an example for longitudinal that Gallaway used: "long longitudinal". Gallaway shares much rarer words and phrases than the list of the ones Erdnase matches with Sanders. Here are some of the matches Gallaway has with Erdnase:

- subterfuge
- hard luck
- end for end
- misnomer
- proportionately
- for all practical purposes
- as a matter of fact, the
- "doctored" / "doctor"; "doctoring"
- endwise
- imparting the knowledge / impart that knowledge (both use it in the preface)
- jog, jogged
- squaring
- longitudinal
- interlocked

These taken together are much more significant, because much rarer in usage, than your short list.

Regarding slang, Gallaway did use the word 'didja' in a company report. I also claim that Gallaway is Eugene Edwards. In his "Jack Pots" you will find lots of Ebonics slang: "Wen I pick up my han' I mos turn pale. I ketch wun mo king en two jack. Sambo he lay low, bekase he em bline. I bet fibe cent, en Washinton he liff me fibe mo." "You ain't been tole me nuttin' 'bout 'em. What kine er narrer scape you mek?", as well as German slang: "Vell, I dell you how it is," said he. "I dinks de way to pluff is to vait undil you gets apout dree aces, and den sock it to dem."
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Leo H
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Are you saying that "longitudinal", 'axiom", and "contrivances" are not rare and unusual words? Even you don't believe that. Who are you kidding here?

You claim that Gallaway is Eugene Edwards but you have no evidence whatsoever. Nothing! Zero! For the time being--all this vernacular speech you posted could be from anybody. Anybody!

Here are more unusual words and phrases that Sanders and Erdnase share:

CULLED:

Erdnase: These examples of CULLING, if FAIRLY WELL executed. [p81]
Sanders: FAIRLY WELL filled with data CULLED in a measure from geologic reports...

DALLIANCE:

Erdnase: If DALLIANCE with the deck is allowed [p60]
Erdnase: when the company will stand for DALLIANCE at all [p62]
Sanders: to tread the primrose paths of DALLIANCE and joyance.

ARCHEOLOGY:

Erdnase: It is a fact well known to ARCHAEOLOGISTS that many very wonderful arts which were possessed by the ancients have, through the course of ages, been completely lost to modern civilization. [p175]

Sanders: the various objects which might serve to enlighten us upon the ARCHAEOLOGY and Ethnology of the Northwest; and such narratives and relics as would be of future interest...

ON THE SQUARE:

Erdnase: it is generally dealt ON THE SQUARE in gambling rooms that are run openly [p18]
Sanders: Is not the western game I yearn To see played ON THE SQUARE

COUPS:

Erdnase: Two or three COUPS in the course of an evening will not flush the quarry [p19]
Sanders: In fact, we're in a precious mess through all their COUPS des main

Also distinctive distinctive/unusual UN-words. ----
Erdnase: with the sublimest UNCONCERN [p10]
Sanders: with UNWHISPERED request that tears and other paraphernalia be reserved for future occasion.
Chris
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Yes, that is exactly what I am saying. I can also proof it. Go to the Google Ngram Viewer https://books.google.com/ngrams , which is a tool that allows you to check how frequently a particular word was used during a certain time period, and put in these words.

Longitudinal we can exclude, because both Sanders and Gallaway use it, but you can included it in the comparison. As you can see in the Google Ngram Viewer longitudinal, axiom, and contrivances were not particularly rare around 1900. Axiom and contrivances appear about 3 times every million words. Anything above one-in-a-million isn't considered rare. Compare this to 'subterfuge' and 'misnomer' for example, which are all below 1 in a million. 'Hard luck' and 'end for end' is even rarer than that. In other words, the list of words that Gallaway matches with Erdnase are a lot rarer and therefore a lot more significant than the ones Sanders shares with Erdnase.

Quote:
On Jun 2, 2018, Leo H wrote:
You claim that Gallaway is Eugene Edwards but you have no evidence whatsoever. Nothing! Zero!

I have lots of evidence. I have an entire chapter of evidence in my ebook "The Hunt for Erdnase" https://www.lybrary.com/the-hunt-for-erd......843.html
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Leo H
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Except that Gallaway doesn't write like Erdnase. Those examples of Gallaway's French you provided are very anemic. Let me know if Gallaway also shares these words with Erdnase as Sanders does:

JOG:

Erdnase: 191 occurrences (card sleight)
Sanders: in this way the JOG can be avoided

COUNTENANCE:

Erdnase: Where the civil authorities COUNTENANCE these institutions [p11]
Sanders: ever at the front to give the light of his COUNTENANCE
Sanders: our friend Page was removing from his COUNTENANCE a week's ragged growth of whiskers

INTERWOVEN:

Erdnase: so that the left hand holds several cards that are not INTERWOVEN at the bottom [p162]
Sanders: so closely INTERWOVEN as to make their undergraduate lives warp and woof of the same fabric

NOWISE:

Erdnase: REVELATIONS are calmly dismissed with the ASSERTION that this or that artifice is employed; in NOWISE attempting to EXPLAIN the process or give the detail of the action mentioned. [p14]
Sanders: are too insignificant for MENTION in this connection, while in other points the DESCRIPTION of the surrounding region in NO WISE tallies therewith.


Quote:
On Jun 2, 2018, Chris wrote:I have lots of evidence. I have an entire chapter of evidence in my ebook "The Hunt for Erdnase" https://www.lybrary.com/the-hunt-for-erd......843.html


An attempt to get people to purchase your overpriced $45.00 e-book? You fell off your rocker and landed on your head. You need to post your evidence here, otherwise it doesn't exist.
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Quote:
On Jun 3, 2018, Leo H wrote:
Except that Gallaway doesn't write like Erdnase.

Pretty much every linguistic point you have raised I documented here in this thread that Gallaway is a better match. Scare quotes, Gallaway matches better. Rare words and phrases, Gallaway is a much better match. Common contractions Gallaway is a perfect match with Erdnase. Sanders not at all. Let's continue below

Quote:
On Jun 3, 2018, Leo H wrote:
JOG:

Erdnase: 191 occurrences (card sleight)
Sanders: in this way the JOG can be avoided

Important to note with jog is that Erdnase is the first in the magic and gambling literature to use jog as a verb. Sanders does not do that, but Gallaway uses jog as a verb as in jogged or jogging like Erdnase. Gallaway is a much better match to Erdnase than Sanders.

Quote:
On Jun 3, 2018, Leo H wrote:
COUNTENANCE:
INTERWOVEN:

As I have shown above, Gallaway matches many more and rarer words than Sanders matches. You have to provide real examples and leave out all the poetry stuff.

Quote:
On Jun 3, 2018, Leo H wrote:
NOWISE:

Erdnase: REVELATIONS are calmly dismissed with the ASSERTION that this or that artifice is employed; in NOWISE attempting to EXPLAIN the process or give the detail of the action mentioned. [p14]
Sanders: are too insignificant for MENTION in this connection, while in other points the DESCRIPTION of the surrounding region in NO WISE tallies therewith.

Sanders writes it 'no wise'. Erdnase 'nowise'. In other words, Sanders is not Erdnase. Different spelling. Gallaway uses 'lengthwise', 'crosswise' and 'endwise' as does Erdnase. Again Gallaway is a better match than Sanders.
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Leo H
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Since Gallaway never wrote "nowis" nor "no wise" as Erdnase and Sanders did, which by the way is a less common word than "lengthwise", "crosswise", and "endwise" Sanders would be a much better match. Also there is no published evidence of Gallaway ever using any UN-words at all such as "unconcerned" and "unwhispered" as used by Sanders and Erdnase.

Gallaway is not Erdnase. He never walked into a gambling joint in his life as Sanders did numerous times. There is no evidence he ever gambled for money. This is an important point since Erdnase admitted to losing money at the gaming table. There is no evidence that Gallaway ever gambled. Nothing! There is also no evidence that Gallaway wrote Jackpots. There is also no credible anagram theory for Gallaway other than your ridiculous idea of a nickname, or the malarkey of the great aunt named Andrews.

Another uncanny similarity between Sanders and Erdnase, the use of the word USUAL:

Erdnase: The USUAL METHOD of "forcing" is to bring the particular [p143]
Sanders: when the USUAL METHODS of timbering may be resorted to.

Erdnase: The USUAL PRACTICE is to deal from the bottom. [p83]
Sanders: the USUAL PRACTICE in the West being for each
Sanders: the USUAL PRACTICE being to make the inner faces of the station sets aline with those of...

Erdnase: bring it down IN THE USUAL WAY of shuffling on [p160]
Sanders: are hung IN THE USUAL WAY by lag-screw

Erdnase: card with the thumb in the USUAL MANNER [p56]
Sanders: to afford secure support to the sets by blocking and wedging in the USUAL MANNER.
Chris
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On Jun 3, 2018, Leo H wrote:
Also there is no published evidence of Gallaway ever using any UN-words at all such as "unconcerned" and "unwhispered" as used by Sanders and Erdnase.

Where exactly does Erdnase use "unwhispered"? And where does Sanders use "unconcerned"? You are fantasizing. Erdnase is ONLY using "unconcerned" and Sanders is ONLY using "unwhispered". That's your similarity? Because they both use a word starting with un- ? Really? That is your linguistic insight? I guess you make statements as they pop into your head without checking the facts. So you end up writing nonsense all the time. "Unconcerned" is not really an unusual un-word. Here is a short sampling of some un-words Gallaway used: uncoated, unfolded, uninterrupted, unmounted, unprinted, unsealed, untrimmed, unwieldy, ... I could go on.

Quote:
On Jun 3, 2018, Leo H wrote:
Another uncanny similarity between Sanders and Erdnase, the use of the word USUAL:

Erdnase: The USUAL METHOD of "forcing" is to bring the particular [p143]
Sanders: when the USUAL METHODS of timbering may be resorted to.

Erdnase: The USUAL PRACTICE is to deal from the bottom. [p83]
Sanders: the USUAL PRACTICE in the West being for each
Sanders: the USUAL PRACTICE being to make the inner faces of the station sets aline with those of...

Erdnase: bring it down IN THE USUAL WAY of shuffling on [p160]
Sanders: are hung IN THE USUAL WAY by lag-screw

Erdnase: card with the thumb in the USUAL MANNER [p56]
Sanders: to afford secure support to the sets by blocking and wedging in the USUAL MANNER.

Here again you simply take a common expression and pretend it is unique to Erdnase and Sanders, or it is an uncommon phrase. Gallaway uses these, too, USUAL MANNER, USUAL METHOD, USUAL WAY, AS USUAL. But I don't think it is particularly Erdnase like, because many use these phrases.
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Leo H
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Quote:
On Jun 6, 2018, Chris wrote:Where exactly does Erdnase use "unwhispered"? And where does Sanders use "unconcerned"? You are fantasizing. Erdnase is ONLY using "unconcerned" and Sanders is ONLY using "unwhispered". That's your similarity? Because they both use a word starting with un- ? Really? That is your linguistic insight? I guess you make statements as they pop into your head without checking the facts. So you end up writing nonsense all the time. "Unconcerned" is not really an unusual un-word. Here is a short sampling of some un-words Gallaway used: uncoated, unfolded, uninterrupted, unmounted, unprinted, unsealed, untrimmed, unwieldy...


Those Un-words you posted are not distinctive, nor are they unusual Un-words. In fact they are fairly common. "Unconcern" and "unwhispered" are examples of very unusual and rarely used Un-words, and they happen to be used by Erdnase and Sanders--not Gallaway. You haven't found any unusual Un-word used by Gallaway.

Another relatively uncommon word shared by both Erdnase and Sanders: PROPRIETORS

Erdnase: we do not refer TO THE PROPRIETORS or managers of gaming houses. [p11]
Sanders: both TO THE PROPRIETORS and to the staffs thereof [montLib]

And also the shared use of the word: MISTY

Erdnase: require nothing more than a bare suspicion of skill to immediately seek a less MISTY atmosphere. [p24]
Sanders: As o'er fair stretches MISTY curtains drift
Sanders: Save MISTY years, save through some vagrant rift

And also the shared use of the word: LOFTY

Erdnase: I shall call upon all four Jacks to execute their ground and LOFTY tumbling at the same time [p192]
Sanders: the victim and principal actor in the comedy has found fame and worthily won his way to proud and LOFTY eminence
Sanders: In imagination let us ascend to some LOFTY height from which we may view...

Proprietors, lofty, and misty. I wonder if Gallaway shares these words with Erdnase...
Chris
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On Jun 6, 2018, Leo H wrote:
Those Un-words you posted are not distinctive, nor are they unusual Un-words. In fact they are fairly common. "Unconcern" and "unwhispered" are examples of very unusual and rarely used Un-words, and they happen to be used by Erdnase and Sanders--not Gallaway. You haven't found any unusual Un-word used by Gallaway.

Every sentence you write is blatantly and provably incorrect. Per Google Ngram viewer UNCONCERNED is more frequently used than these un-words Gallaway used: UNCOATED, UNMOUNTED, UNPRINTED, UNSEALED, UNTRIMMED. Only UNWIELDY is slightly more frequently used. So most of the examples I have given are much rarer than "unconcerned". "Unwhispered" is very rare, but Erdnase is not using it. Your argument therefore makes zero sense. You are incorrect in pretty much every linguistic point you tried to make so far.
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Leo H
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Answer the question! Proprietors, lofty, and misty. Did Gallaway share those words with Erdnase as Sanders did? Never mind--I'll clue you in:

Gallaway never used these three words.

Gallaway never walked into a gambling joint and never wrote Jackpots. Never in his life wrote vernacular speech to create a believable character as Erdnase and Sanders have done. Your examples of Gallaway's French are pitifully anemic and laughable. Most English speakers who have never studied French are already familiar with those few examples you provided.

You have no evidence for any of your outlandish claims--and yet expect/hope? to be paid for your half-baked and overpriced ebook?

Both Erdnase and Sanders share an affinity for the derivation of terms:

Sanders was very interested in the derivation of words and names. While librarian for the Montana Historical Society, he wrote an in-depth article on the derivation of the name Montana. And in his Columbia class reunion bios, he explicates the sources of the nicknames of his classmates. In addition, his mining articles also describe the derivation of terminology.
Sanders: the WORD is an adjective form that is DERIVED from the noun mount or mountain. [MONT]
Sanders: making their way over to the headwaters of the Musselshell river, SO NAMED because of the shells that are to be found along its banks. [MONT]
Sanders: Of Starek we remember the CAUSE which led to the NICKNAME by which he was known to us all, that of "Pop" Starek. [CRbio]
Sanders: ERNEST JULIUS HYACINTH AMY...a name which served the double use of his COGNOMEN and our own mark of affection, for he was never known to us by his FRONT NAME or any of them.
Sanders: This designation is now generally applied to the plates of both the vertical and inclined shafts, although it is probable that the NAME ORIGINATED in connection with the timbering of the latter ...and this SIGNIFICANCE of the TERM was finally EXTENDED TO comprehend the similar longer plates of vertical shafts as well. [MT]

Erdnase displays a similar interest in the derivation of names and other terms. He mentions the likely source of the term "cold deck" and points out that the standard name of a sleight ("back palm") is actually a misnomer. He also takes time to describe the origins of names that he, himself, has invented.
Erdnase: The "Cold Deck" ... The NAME is probably DERIVED from the fact that the deck must await its opportunity long enough to contract a chill in the interim. [p18]
Erdnase: The Back Palm.-- We are afraid the above title is a MISNOMER.
Erdnase:The Longitudinal Shift.-- This shift, for which we have to thank no one, is GIVEN A VERY LONG NAME ... [p135]
Erdnase: The S. W. E. Shift. We have not DUBBED the following process with OUR INITIALS because we wish to appear "big on the bills," but merely to GIVE IT A NAME. [p134]
Chris
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You really do amuse me. When your earlier 'linguistic' arguments turned out to be flawed you quickly come up with new ones, also flawed.
Quote:
On Jun 6, 2018, Leo H wrote:
Answer the question! Proprietors, lofty, and misty. Did Gallaway share those words with Erdnase as Sanders did? Never mind--I'll clue you in:

Gallaway never used these three words.


Neither of these three words is rare or uncommon. Look it up. Shared use is therefore not an authorship indicator. But to satisfy your curiosity, Gallaway used "proprietor" several times. Here is one example: "The PROPRIETOR of the office buys a composing machine to enable a man to work at five or six times his speed setting type by hand."


Quote:
On Jun 6, 2018, Leo H wrote:
...and yet expect/hope? to be paid for your half-baked and overpriced ebook?

I don't need to hope. My ebook has sold well and is funding the ongoing research into Gallaway.

Quote:
On Jun 6, 2018, Leo H wrote:
Both Erdnase and Sanders share an affinity for the derivation of terms:

You may be interested to learn that Gallaway coined his own terms: copyfitting, square-pica

Quote:
On Jun 6, 2018, Leo H wrote:
Erdnase displays a similar interest in the derivation of names and other terms. He mentions the likely source of the term "cold deck" and points out that the standard name of a sleight ("back palm") is actually a MISNOMER.

MISNOMER is an interesting word, because it is uncommon, much more uncommon than your lofty, misty, proprietor, longitudinal, unconcerned, etc. How often is Sanders using misnomer? Zero times. Gallaway is using it multiple times.
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Leo H
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On Jun 7, 2018, Chris wrote:Neither of these three words is rare or uncommon. Look it up. Shared use is therefore not an authorship indicator. But to satisfy your curiosity, Gallaway used "proprietor" several times. Here is one example: "The PROPRIETOR of the office buys a composing machine to enable a man to work at five or six times his speed setting type by hand."


Oh? So Gallaway did use the word "proprietor" but you still haven't found any examples from Gallaway's writings where he used the words "misty" and "lofty"? One out of three words is not good. If these three words are not rare and uncommon as you claim, then why don't you submit examples of Gallaway using "misty" and "lofty"? There should be examples of Gallaway using these two words then...right?


Quote:
On Jun 7, 2018, Chris wrote:
I don't need to hope. My ebook has sold well and is funding the ongoing research into Gallaway.


If your half-baked and overpriced ebook is selling well, it might be due in part to your aggressive hyping and marketing on magic forum threads where the advertising is free for you.

Quote:
On Jun 7, 2018, Chris wrote:
You may be interested to learn that Gallaway coined his own terms: copyfitting, square-pica


And nothing Erdnasian about "copyfitting" and "square-pica" is there? And I have not seen any evidence of an interest in the origins of words as shown by both Sanders and Erdnase.

Erdnase and Sanders both take delight in pointing out hypocrisy and pretense. In this example, they sarcastically mock so-called "professionals" and their ruses and deceptions. And in doing so, they use identical metaphors (EXHUMING) and alliteration (Wicked/Wiles/Waste).
Erdnase: Self-styled "EX-PROFESSIONALS" have regaled the public with astounding disclosures of their former WILES and WICKEDNESS, and have proven a wonderful knowledge of the subject by EXHUMING some ANTIQUATED moss-covered ruses [p13]

Sanders: certainly in part it is too good to keep, and in a spirit of benevolence and as an offering upon the shrine of professional goodwill toward PROFESSIONAL brethren, the following extracts have been EXHUMED from their OBSCURE place of burial [...] and how many reports presuming to describe mining properties are written that should never have been penned - because of the WICKED WASTE of ink resulting therefrom.
Leo H
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Quote:
On Jun 7, 2018, Leo H wrote:
Quote:
On Jun 7, 2018, Chris wrote:Neither of these three words is rare or uncommon. Look it up. Shared use is therefore not an authorship indicator. But to satisfy your curiosity, Gallaway used "proprietor" several times. Here is one example: "The PROPRIETOR of the office buys a composing machine to enable a man to work at five or six times his speed setting type by hand."


Oh? So Gallaway did use the word "proprietor" but you still haven't found any examples from Gallaway's writings where he used the words "misty" and "lofty"? One out of three words is not good. If these three words are not rare and uncommon as you claim, then why don't you submit examples of Gallaway using "misty" and "lofty"? There should be examples of Gallaway using these two words then...right?


Quote:
On Jun 7, 2018, Chris wrote:
I don't need to hope. My ebook has sold well and is funding the ongoing research into Gallaway.


If your half-baked and overpriced ebook is selling well, it might be due in part to your aggressive hyping and marketing on magic forum threads where the advertising is free for you.

Quote:
On Jun 7, 2018, Chris wrote:
You may be interested to learn that Gallaway coined his own terms: copyfitting, square-pica


And nothing Erdnasian about "copyfitting" and "square-pica" is there? And I have not seen any evidence of an interest in the origins of words from Gallaway as shown by both Sanders and Erdnase.

Erdnase and Sanders both take delight in pointing out hypocrisy and pretense. In this example, they sarcastically mock so-called "professionals" and their ruses and deceptions. And in doing so, they use identical metaphors (EXHUMING) and alliteration (Wicked/Wiles/Waste).
Erdnase: Self-styled "EX-PROFESSIONALS" have regaled the public with astounding disclosures of their former WILES and WICKEDNESS, and have proven a wonderful knowledge of the subject by EXHUMING some ANTIQUATED moss-covered ruses [p13]

Sanders: certainly in part it is too good to keep, and in a spirit of benevolence and as an offering upon the shrine of professional goodwill toward PROFESSIONAL brethren, the following extracts have been EXHUMED from their OBSCURE place of burial [...] and how many reports presuming to describe mining properties are written that should never have been penned - because of the WICKED WASTE of ink resulting therefrom.
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Quote:
On Jun 7, 2018, Leo H wrote:
There should be examples of Gallaway using these two words then...right?

No. You should learn statistics.
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Quote:
On Jun 8, 2018, Chris wrote:
Quote:
On Jun 7, 2018, Leo H wrote:
There should be examples of Gallaway using these two words then...right?

No. You should learn statistics.


And you should be looking for more evidence on Gallaway, especially in matters of the gaming table. Statistics will not help you.

Bob Coyne recently updated his linguistic analyses between Sanders and Erdnase:

http://www.cs.columbia.edu/~coyne/erdnas......ss-photo
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The hours, indeed years, people have been trying to find out who was Erdnase.

The only questions I've ever had on this subject are:

- what does it honestly matter, and
- what are you going to do exactly when you find out? Is it going to be a life-changing revelation (no pun intended)?

An anonymous bloke (or even blokes) wrote a book on card sleights in 1902; indeed, I think it was written (and illustrated) very poorly. Because he/they remain anonymous and let's be honest, nobody will probably EVER know for certain who wrote it, people start arguing the toss and trying to outshine each other with 'their invesitgative knowledge'.

I just don't get the hype - firstly about the actual book; nor the purpose of worrying about who wrote it.

People must surely have a lot of free time in their lives. Smile
Barry Allen

"The Rules of the Sleight-of-Hand Artist, are three and all others are vain; the first and second are 'practice', and the third one is 'practice again'.

Edward Victor 1936
Leo H
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On Jun 11, 2018, Merc Man wrote:
The hours, indeed years, people have been trying to find out who was Erdnase.

The only questions I've ever had on this subject are:

- what does it honestly matter, and
- what are you going to do exactly when you find out? Is it going to be a life-changing revelation (no pun intended)?

An anonymous bloke (or even blokes) wrote a book on card sleights in 1902; indeed, I think it was written (and illustrated) very poorly. Because he/they remain anonymous and let's be honest, nobody will probably EVER know for certain who wrote it, people start arguing the toss and trying to outshine each other with 'their invesitgative knowledge'.

I just don't get the hype - firstly about the actual book; nor the purpose of worrying about who wrote it.

People must surely have a lot of free time in their lives. Smile


People had enough free time on their hands to find a cure for polio and other illnesses. Thanks to those people you survived your childhood fairly well with vaccinations.

If you actually take the time to read the book, you will realize that it is clearly, and concisely written. The illustrations are pretty good as well.

Why does it matter to discover the identity of Erdnase? Because the truth matters. And what will people do with the information if his identity is confirmed? Probably hold symposiums and discuss why he did it.
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Profile of Cleverpaws
Quote:
On Jun 11, 2018, Leo H wrote:

People had enough free time on their hands to find a cure for polio and other illnesses. Thanks to those people you survived your childhood fairly well with vaccinations.



Comparing Erdnase to the creators of the polio vaccine is just ridiculous.

The two vaccines have eliminated polio from most of the world and reduced the number of cases reported each year from an estimated 350,000 in 1988 to 22 in 2017.

Can anything erdnase did compare to that?

Jonas Edward Salk (October 28, 1914 – June 23, 1995) was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital.[1] Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.[2]
Leo H
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Profile of Leo H
In that case--stick with the study of the history of medical science and forget about magic, since you deem it a trivial matter.
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