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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » Easy tricks that have built-in misdirection (9 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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funsway
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old things in new ways - new things in old ways
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In an attempt to put the OP in perspective, I reviewed some foundational material. One is "Principles and Deceptions" by Arthur H. Buckley

"(1) Misdirection, (2) Sustained Attention, (3) Diverted Attention, (4) Restriction, (5) Repetition, (6) Conclusion, (7) Climax, (8) Anti-Climax, (9) Mannerism, (10) Surprise, (11) Expectancy, (12) Memory, (13) Mnemonics, (14) Reconstructive Imagination, (15) Dramatics and (16) Humor are the abstract or psychological factors that aid in its accomplishment."

So, without defining exactly what misdirection is we can see what it is not. It is also distinct from the "principles of magic" or the "types of illusion"

So, I have erred to some degree in including examples of psychological ploys as "misdirection" that might better fit as "reconstructive imagination" or "conclusion."

tricky subject, this ...
"the more one pretends at magic, the more awe and wonder will be found in real life." Arnold Furst



ShareBooks at www.eversway.com * questions at funsway@eversway.com
jimgerrish
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One of the real masters of guided focus is Tommy Wonder, and one of the best examples of it is his Two Cup routine: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzFu_IuK8-k It will cost a bit more than $5 to learn the secrets either from his DVDs (Visions of Wonder) or his Books (Books of Wonder)but it is always a pleasure to watch him at work.
Aus
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Understanding the principles of misdirection is important so when you do a magic trick which requires it, you know where your focus should be. A trick with misdirection requires study and understanding, so well we can all suggest tricks where misdirection plays it's part I'll offer points to focus that study.

The fundamentals principles of misdirection are the following:

The audience will pay attention to what moves. They will also pay attention to what makes noise.

What doesn't move and doesn't make noise doesn’t attract attention.

The audience will always look where the magician looks.

The magician must never look at what he wishes to conceal.

The audience will treat as important what the magician treats as important.

The audience will treat as unimportant what the magician treats as unimportant.

The magician nearly always treats what is important as if it were unimportant. Likewise, he treats what is unimportant as if it were important.

When ever you do a trick that requires misdirection look and keep this principles in mind.

Now as for tricks, I recommend the following.

The first trick I recommend is the salt shaker through the table, yes it is in many elementary books on magic but don't let that fool you, the impact that trick when performed correctly is astonishing.

You can learn the trick for free by going to penguin magic and download their "Secrets of Magic by Rick Lax".

http://www.penguinmagic.com/p/7876

Just a subtlety I add to the trick on the reveal of the coin after it's first failed attempt to pass through. I suddenly notice that the coin is heads up instead of tails up. No wonder it didn't work, I then turn the coin over and cover it with the salt shaker, and again utters some magic words.

Points to remember when performing:

1. Just as you must make the coin seem important to the trick, you must make the salt shaker seem unimportant.

2. Always handle the shell as if it really contained the shaker.

3. Learn what kinds of napkins will hold a shape. Stiff paper napkins are ideal. Newspaper is an excellent substitute.

4. Never lift the shell so high or tilt it at such an angle that the audience will be able to see inside.

3. Never rush through the coin part of the trick. Act as if you genuinely expect the coin to penetrate the table.

6. Keep the shell even with or slightly below the edge of the table when you release the shaker. If you do so, the maneuver will be impossible to
detect.

7. Work on the timing of the coin turn and the shaker drop, so that you do them simultaneously and without hesitating or fumbling.

8. Add or subtract from the trick whatever makes it work best for you. Many magicians steal the shaker on the second peek. It’s a matter of choice

Just as a abstract lesson, look at the misdirection elements of this performance and see if you can see the misdirection principles being applied that I quoted earlier .



Magically

Aus
Ado
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IIRC, the effect taught along the top change in Card College (card under coin?) is a great example of misdirection that teaches how a well-crafted trick makes the top change impossible to see.

P!
Kanawati
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There is a technically really easy to perform quick coins across in Bobo's Modern Coin Magic called Two Pennies on the Leg. Great misdirection built into that one two.
funsway
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In this routine the performer combines 10-count, two in hand, Benson Bowl and more.
Each approach uses misdirection in a direct way.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YECtg4Ut2CA
"the more one pretends at magic, the more awe and wonder will be found in real life." Arnold Furst



ShareBooks at www.eversway.com * questions at funsway@eversway.com
jimhlou
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The absolute best trick with built-in misdirection is the pen through dollar. When done, everyone is completely focused on the dollar bill. They completely ignore the pen! I've done this dozens of times, and it's always the same.
Bob G
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Jimhlou,


That sounds intriguing. Can you recommend a good place to learn this? I may be wrong, but I can imagine that there are millions of pen-through-dollar-bills. I want to make sure I find the version you're talking about. Thanks for posting!
Doug Trouten
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Bob -- It involves a prop purchase. Are you fortunate enough to have a brick-and-mortar magic shop in your area? If so, they could probably set you up with this. If not, I'm sure one of the fine vendors who advertise on the Magic Café will have a selection available. (I use "The Stealth Pen.")
It's still magic even if you know how it's done.
Terry Pratchett
Bob G
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Thanks, Douog. Sadly, we no longer have such a shop -- we used to have one, but, like so many these days, it went out of business some years ago. There's one about an hour from here (it includes a little theater and is center to a thriving magic community), so when I have time to drive out there I'll check with them about ordering the prop for me.
Bob G
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Kanawati, I just looked up the Two Pennies on Leg in Bobo and it looks really fun, and, with enough practice, within my range. You're absolutely right about the built-in misdirection. I never would have thought to look so far into Bobo for a trick that I could perform, so I'm grateful to you for pointing it out.


Aus, thanks for taking so much time to lay out the practical side of misdirection, and the specifics of the shaker-through-table effect, in such detail. If you're not a professional teacher, you still have a teacher's instincts: assigning an exercise. (I'm a math professor -- though not a fan of mathematical magic tricks -- so I know good teaching when I see it.) I have yet to carry it out your ideas, but they're on my short list.


Ado, thanks for the "top change" suggestion. I love Giobbi. The top change is beyond my reach at the moment, but I'll read the trick to get an idea of the misdirection involved.


JimG, thanks for the Tommy Wonder idea. I haven't had a chance to look at the youtube yet, but I will soon.


Funsway, thanks as always. I had seen the Ryan Hayashi video before, when I was unfamiliar with the Ten Count. Having looked at it again at your suggestion, I can at least I can recognize that he's incorporated the Ten Count. Clearly this video will stand much rewatching as I gain more knowledge and experience. If anyone says that magic isn't an Art, this video would be a good rebuttal. I wonder if Hayashi has some dance training -- he's beautiful to watch, and that adds to the pleasure of his magic.


And I want to add a heart-felt thanks to everyone who's been responding to my question. I'm getting a real education about the practical and philosophical sides of misdirection, and a nice collection of tricks to learn and with which to put misdirection into practice. I'm touched that so many experienced magicians are willing, even eager, to help a beginner start on the "Royal Road.



Bob
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