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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » Changing double lift? (4 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Arnaud M
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France
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Curently if I want to do a double lift I just grab two cards from the hand right inner corner and turn them over. I do it... not so bad : I someties get caught (if I do it many times in a row) but they are clean. So I thought to learn a cleaner one. But before I go in learinnig a new and harder sleight I just want your opinion on the question: shall I learn a more advanced double lift or try to improve the one I use?
Ado
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Pittsburgh, PA
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Stop doing many in a row.

P!
WooG
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First and most important is to learn the time of when to do the lift or when to do the get ready.
Eventually learning a good pushoff second deal will transition perfectly to your double lift or a pinky count. But first I would just focus on timing and off beats. Make eye contact with them to avoid them from looking for the move
danaruns
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The City of Angels
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Are you getting caught because you don't have the move down, or because the DL is just a crappy move to begin with?

It is the rare routine that requires a bunch of DLs in a row. You might simply be doing too many of them. Any move repeated enough can be spotted, and anyone who knows what a DL is can spot it no matter how well it is done.

If your DL is good, can you do fewer of them? Why would you do it "many times in a row"?
"Dana Douglas is the greatest magician alive. Plus, I'm drunk." -- Foster Brooks
Pat Fash
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The DL is a weird move...I probably do the same DL you do, which is basically a Stike DL. At least that's what your description sounds like. And even though I have done this move for ever I still am not comfortable with it. My solution would be the same as anyone elses in this thread.: Don't do it that often. And if you do it, try doing it on the off-beat. My whole AC routine contains a whooping 2 DLs because I avoid it as much as I can.
Arnaud M
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Ok thanks I'll try to change my ACR Smile
davidpaul$
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When you are performing, hand a deck to different spectators and just ask them to turn the top card over. Notice how they do it.
I was surprised that no one turned the card over as most of US do. They turned it end over end as opposed to side to side.
Also keep the deck tilted downward which hides the thickness of the card (s) from those with eagle attentative eyes.

You might like Larry Jennings Snap Double. (Great advice above.)

I remember Jay Sankey flicking a single away from the deck while getting a break and putting the card back on top of the deck
to execute the DL. I often use this technique.
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Ado
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Quote:
On Sep 2, 2017, davidpaul$ wrote:
When you are performing, hand a deck to different spectators and just ask them to turn the top card over. Notice how they do it.
I was surprised that no one turned the card over as most of US do.


Why would they?
Give a guitar to someone who doesn't play, and see how they pluck and press the strings. Give a rubik's cube to someone, and see how they handle it.
There's nothing wrong with not being utterly awkward with whatever props you use regularly...

P!
Livaudais
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Quote:
On Sep 7, 2017, Ado wrote:
Quote:
On Sep 2, 2017, davidpaul$ wrote:
When you are performing, hand a deck to different spectators and just ask them to turn the top card over. Notice how they do it.
I was surprised that no one turned the card over as most of US do.



There's nothing wrong with not being utterly awkward with whatever props you use regularly...


I agree with your general sentiment here, absolutely. We're going to handle our tools a bit differently than a layperson of course. I cannot speak for David, however, I suppose what they meant was be natural.

It's a good rule of thumb but I think you've got to be natural to who you are as a magician. We've all got our particular and unique way of handling things and that's what we have to work with.

Personally, I've been working on a DL that's a little difficult to explain because it is a combination of a Strike DL and (if I need to show it around)
a reverse handling of the squaring action of Nash's KO.

It works well for my personal style.
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WitchDocChris
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York, PA
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I think magicians practice odd sleights so much it's easy to forget how we handled cards when they were just a thing we were using to play a game. My family and I used to play card games when I was a kid, but not super frequently. During that time I developed the habits of shuffling certain ways, dealing cards certain ways, and flipping over cards to show them in certain ways. When I started doing magic the doubles I learned didn't reflect those natural actions for me.

Then I got the best advice for doubles I've ever heard: Make your doubles look like singles, and make your singles look like doubles.

Turns out, I naturally show a single card in an action that looks just like a push off double. So I worked at that for a while to make it smooth (Excellent advice in Expert Card Technique on a good push off) and I also worked at making sure no matter how many cards I lifted, I did the same motions.
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RyanWhiteside
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Practice the one you have next to actually turning one card over. Practice actually turning over the top card and notice how you do it, try to make your double lift as close to the real thing as lpossible, or on your case, do this the other way around.
Cheers
R
DaveGripenwaldt
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Quote:
On Sep 7, 2017, Livaudais wrote:
Quote:
On Sep 7, 2017, Ado wrote:
Quote:
On Sep 2, 2017, davidpaul$ wrote:
When you are performing, hand a deck to different spectators and just ask them to turn the top card over. Notice how they do it.
I was surprised that no one turned the card over as most of US do.



There's nothing wrong with not being utterly awkward with whatever props you use regularly...


I agree with your general sentiment here, absolutely. We're going to handle our tools a bit differently than a layperson of course. I cannot speak for David, however, I suppose what they meant was be natural.

It's a good rule of thumb but I think you've got to be natural to who you are as a magician. We've all got our particular and unique way of handling things and that's what we have to work with.

Personally, I've been working on a DL that's a little difficult to explain because it is a combination of a Strike DL and (if I need to show it around)
a reverse handling of the squaring action of Nash's KO.

It works well for my personal style.


I'm with L on this one. Slights that lead someone down the garden path and then take a surprising turn (DL, coin vanish, etc.) are not the same as being smoothing out the incidental handling of objects. Approximating how a spectator does something, like turning over a card, is key to fooling them with a move that looks like what they do, but does a hidden something extra.

A long time ago, Earl Nelson told me about his own version of the experiment suggested earlier. He asked people to turn over a card and found that, even thought they may revolve that card differently, there was one thing they all did the same...pushing the card off the deck with their thumbs. Does that mean no other double lift other than a push-off double will go by? No, but but I think it is arguably better when a spectator identifies an action you do as entirely natural...and how they personally do the same action is their go-to template for what natural looks like.
Tap Roniart
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This is interesting. I would think that an onlooker would see another person's card flip as different than their own-maybe not even recognizing it as the same due to reverse angle/view. Jean Hugard mentions any hand work as needing to be consistent. If you do something different, it gets noticed. Casinos do the same thing watching dealers. Anything out of the ordinary catches the eye-even if they aren't watching the monitor directly.

If you are presenting yourself as a showman/woman/person, then there is already an assumed level of 'showmanship' expected, I'd hope, in that they know you handle cards differently than a 'normal' person. So should you give them what they expect, or take the low road and try to present yourself as 'one of the crowd'?

I've always thought that there are different reasons for choosing one DL over another, like position of hands & audience, misdirection in place, or even general body movement. I'd like to think any movement is not restricted to one body part, and the rest ignored. You know, like a fluid, efficient movement of the whole presenter, but so natural looking that there is no attention drawn to anything but what you want them looking at.

For example, if you precede a DL by laying a card down, where is the spectator looking?
Tap Roniart

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