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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The little darlings » » Giving treats to children in the audience (3 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

REV BILL
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Glen Burnie Maryland
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How many of you magically produce and give treats to children in the audience? I heard horror stories about kids getting sick or choke so the parents brought legal action against the performer.
Specializing in Family Entertainment,Gospel,Comedy and Educational programs for over 30 years.(Order of Merlin)
Ken Northridge
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Atlantic City, NJ
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In one of my first magic shows (1975, 13 years old) I produced a dish full of candy from my dove pan. The chaotic scene that followed convinced me never to do it again.
"Love is the real magic." -Doug Henning
www.KenNorthridge.com
Dick Oslund
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I tell a story in my book about this!

Twinsdale Ohio Elementary (K-4)

A LOCAL magician had appeared in the school, and produced a pan full of candy to close his "show".

A "near riot" occurred, as the K-4 audience rushed the platform. Torn shirt, broken glasses, bloody noses, ETC.

Producing "treats" may have been OK in Victorian parlor shows, but, not in the 21st century.
SNEAKY, UNDERHANDED, DEVIOUS,& SURREPTITIOUS ITINERANT MOUNTEBANK
MaveriQ
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Dayton, Ohio
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I produce suckers at most parties. I clear it with the hiring party first. I just pass them around in a bowl. I DON'T do it if there are more than 25 or so spectators. I do it because it's a great lead in to LOLLI HERO, which is amazing! It is a close up effect, so I wouldn't do it for large audiences anyway. Lolli Hero is so good, it's worth a small inconvenience while kids are reaching for a sucker.
Russo
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There's a LOT of allergies around - even with a parents permission - they wont know all the childrens problems - better SAFE than sorry. Best NOT TOO-
REV BILL
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Glen Burnie Maryland
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I don't do it for the reasons I have mentioned. Better ways to finale a show.
Specializing in Family Entertainment,Gospel,Comedy and Educational programs for over 30 years.(Order of Merlin)
Russo
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I would finish our kids program by haveing them all stand up - then ask them to bring their hand together real fast 10 times - when they did, I' say, "thank you for a standing ovation" L-O-L .
Dynamike
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What would you guys do if the host wanted you to pass out the candy he/she purchased at the end of your show?
MaveriQ
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Dayton, Ohio
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That would be a tough one. Kids waiting until the end and watching the candy might be distracting. For me, the candy leads into another trick. If I couldn't use it for that reason, I probably wouldn't use it at all.
Dick Oslund
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If watching a bowl of candy, is more interesting, and/or entertaining than your performance, YOU, apparently, have a problem.

MAYBE, Ken Weber's "Making Magic Entertaining", MIGHT help.
SNEAKY, UNDERHANDED, DEVIOUS,& SURREPTITIOUS ITINERANT MOUNTEBANK
MaveriQ
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Dayton, Ohio
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Touche
apparently, your local magician should've done his candy trick in the middle of his show instead of the end. then he wouldv'e had no problems.
Dick Oslund
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Maybe I'm missing something! Please share your thoughts! How would tossing out, or handing out, free candy to primary school kids, in the middle of the program, have made a difference?
SNEAKY, UNDERHANDED, DEVIOUS,& SURREPTITIOUS ITINERANT MOUNTEBANK
arthur stead
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When I played soccer, I hit
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I learnt the hard way about making candy appear and then passing it out to the kids. Never again!

Although, I once had a birthday mom start handing out cake to the kids DURING my performance! After that, I created a “guidelines” agreement for clients, wherein I stated all my requirements (which were specifically designed to avoid any complications).
Arthur Stead
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MaveriQ
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Dayton, Ohio
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"a bowl of candy, is more interesting, and/or entertaining than your performance, YOU, apparently, have a problem."
If he was a good entertainer the kids would've just ignored the candy, as was most certainly your implication in replying to my post.
REV BILL
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Glen Burnie Maryland
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Arthur wrote: "I created a “guidelines” agreement for clients, wherein I stated all my requirements (which were specifically designed to avoid any complications".I do something like that too. I learned the hard way as well yearssssssssssssss ago.
Specializing in Family Entertainment,Gospel,Comedy and Educational programs for over 30 years.(Order of Merlin)
longdeademperor
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Sometimes I produce and give out candy during the middle of the show. Sometimes I produce and give it out at the end. It just depends on how I am structuring the individual performance and that show's finale. Usually I am performing for groups at home birthday parties or for a single class in a school. There are normally no more than 30 children present. Often there are about 20 or less. I have never produced candy before a school audience of several hundred children. If I had to, I think I would do so at the very end of the show and entrust it to the principal or other official teacher in charge so that it could be distributed to each class separately once the show was over and the children had returned to their classrooms. Under those circumstances it could even be given out at the end of the school day as a reward for good student behavior. I would clear this all up in advance with the school too, especially as some schools do not want any candy to be distributed. On balance, I think I would probably avoid producing candy for a large school audience, particularly if they were under six or seven years old.

I produce my candy in a coffee reception vase. I find that because the candy is contained by the prop and is not seen at all if the lid is replaced on the vase, even if I produce and distribute the candy in the middle of the show, the children quickly lose focus on the candy. Also, it helps that I put the coffee reception vase away in my case immediately after the candy is distributed and I distract the children by moving on to a different routine. I think it would be a very different state of affairs if I produced a pile of candy that sat visibly on my case for the duration of the rest of the show!

Mainly I produce and distribute gummy bears. With Jewish and Muslim events etc., I will use culturally appropriate candy.

I have a volunteer, normally the birthday child, assist me in producing the candy. Then, before I give out any of it, I get the children to sit down with crossed legs, their two hands cupped together in front of them and their eyes closed. I tell them that if they do all this, I know that they are ready to receive the candy. It also shows me who does not want the candy as sometimes children don't, whether for dietary, medical or other reasons. I go around the group and individually put candy in each child's hands. I tell them that they cannot open their eyes until they feel something in their hands. Sometimes I have the volunteer or an older sibling or parent help me distribute the candy if the group is on the larger side. The children who are complying and sitting with their hands cupped in front of them and their eyes closed will receive the candy first and I praise the children by name who are complying in order to encourage the stragglers to follow suit. If I get to a child who has not followed my directions, I repeat them in a friendly manner to that child and say that I cannot give them candy until they are ready. That often gets them to quickly comply or the child then tells me at this juncture that they don't want candy and I move on to the next one.
danfreed
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West Chester PA
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I do Photoshop by Will Tsai to produce 1 Hershey Kiss, not during a show but for strolling magic, or for the birthday kid after the show before I leave. It's a great trick an easy to do. If you order it, make sure the magic vendor checks the wallet for you because the photos are put in the wallet in advance and get stuck in storage sometimes and ruin it.
Mary Mowder
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Sacramento / Elk Grove, CA
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Candy sounds so sweet but it is a mine field. Believe me I've wanted to try it a number of times but thinking it through I've always decided not to do it.

Kids with allergies, Parents limiting sweets, sticky hands, crinkling wrappers, Kids making a mess at the hostesses house, siblings who did not get the stage treat etc can ruin the Magic.

Let the host hand out anything he/she wants. If it were brought up ahead of time one might consider producing candy but not till the end and the host would have to hand it out.

Since I don't have such a production, I probably would not do it myself but someone else might.

When we connect everything good with food it makes everything good a trigger for eating. I don't want to add to a national problem.

-Mary Mowder
Firestorm60
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U.K.
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I was at a wedding and they had an flower decorated market sweet cart for the guests and at a another they had a help yourself sweet table so it is popular
Sseizing the moment I did Dave Loosely sweets using the bags they had and pastels. But I agree with the sugar argument the parents seemed to spend a lot of the time chasing down hypo kids Why not use penny toys instead depending on your fee
BradenCarlisle
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I leave the treats to the event organizers. I like the kiddos to be focused on the show and even one kid getting water can send EVERY kid to get water, so I stay away from treats. That's not to say I don't have goodies to give away, just nothing edible. Food can be a sensitive subject.
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