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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Rings, strings & things » » What is the origin of the "Oddball" trick shown here? (17 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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1KJ
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I love this effect as well. Some years ago I did a magic workshop and I cut a bunch of wooden "stickmen" figures with a hole through the waist. the routine I taught involved a cowboy scene where the "good guy" was tied up by the "bad guy" and he had to escape. It was a lot of fun and the participants loved it!

KJ
docguitarman
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Quote:
On Dec 7, 2017, docguitarman wrote:
Quote:
On Dec 7, 2017, Dougini wrote:
Love the trick! The problem I am trying to solve is the setup. They examine all components. You thread the ball and put it in the little box. Proceed normally. I know there has to be a way without the distraction of a space shuttle launch for misdirection. I have a way I've been doing, but think there must be an even better way. This one really is a trick for more experienced magicians due to the difficulty in setup.

Doug


The Royal Tube 'n Cord version was fully examinable and required no set up, IIRC. Instead of the usual configuration of the cords, they were visibly tied around a ribbon then inserted in the tube with the ribbon protruding from the hole in the side. The cords are cross tied as in all versions. Pulling the ribbon out the tube escaped and fell.


A few months back I tried to reconstruct the method of the tying of the ropes to the ribbon and failed. I gave up. Pondering it again recently I think the cords were not tied but just sneakily wrapped around the ribbon and two ends of rope pushed through the tube and then the ribbon pulled out of the hole. Then the ropes were cross tied, etc.

My question: Does anyone here have access to the original instructions? I don't want to spend over $100 for a "Royal Treasure Chest of Magic" to get the "Lessons in Magic by Tarbell" booklet that came with the set. I don't need a copy, just confirmation that my new recollection is correct. I'm pretty sure it is, and it only requires a simple move.

PM if anyone wants to discuss it in private.

Thanks!
Julie
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You are right, there's no real "move". The audience helper is instructed to hold the ribbon outstretched between her two hands. Performer drapes the cords evenly one at a time over the ribbon. The two ends of each cord are grasped by each of the performer's hands (i.e. both ends of cord "A" are held by the performer's left hand and and the two ends of cord "B" by the right.)

The two ends of each cord are kept separate from the other cord and are handled as one as the cords are tied into a loose knot around the ribbon. The knotted cord (two ends) is slid into the tube with a hole in its side. When the ribbon arrives at the level of the hole, the performer stops the pulling process. The situation now is that there are two ends of cord outside each end of the tube. Performer has pulled one end of the ribbon so it is protruding from the hole in the tube.

Audience helper is holding two ends of cord in each hand and the entire assembly is displayed by this outstretched posture (the tube with ribbon protruding through the hole is in the center). Performer instructs the audience helper to drop ONE cord from each of her hands. Performer ties these two cords into a loose knot over the metal tube and returns one cord to each of the helper's hands. Note: you can expand the scope of the effect by using TWO audience helpers and each one holds one set of cords.

All that remains is for the performer to pull the ribbon out of the tube through the hole. At the same time (with the other hand) hold onto the cords and the tube so the whole assembly doesn't come apart until you are ready for the dramatic moment. Wave the "magic ribbon" over the tube or make an incantation etc. and remove the tube AND the knots are gone!

As I recall, Tube 'n Cord was supplied with the strip of ribbon, the metal tube and two long pieces of velvety
drapery cord with a fringed tassel at each end. A lot of Magic for just 50 cents!

Julie
docguitarman
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Thanks Julie,

What you describe is what I thought I had done! But obviously not! I must have been staring at the shoe strings cross-eyed when I tried it a few month back and failed! Did it just now with a home made cardboard tube (holographic paper), ribbon and black boot shoe laces. Worked like a charm!

I'm surprised this effect is not marketed these days as it is so simple and requires no set up.

Phil
docguitarman
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Well I did it twice in a row, then failed on the 3rd time... The tie around the ribbon got too snug and basically turned into a messy taut granny knot and the ribbon wouldn't pull out and just kept getting tighter as I pulled on it. Got to keep the first "knot" rather loose!
John Long
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Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic contains a method that sounds very similar to what you are trying to reproduce - look for Cords of Fantasia.

Instead of a ribbon, he uses a rod.
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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Rings, strings & things » » What is the origin of the "Oddball" trick shown here? (17 Likes)
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