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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » Scott Tokar - How to Make 6 Figures in Magic (18 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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brehan
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Joe and Christopher,

Thanks for the tips and reaction to my question. Very helpfull.

Brehan
Stokar
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Greetings,

I hope this response will answer a few questions you might have regarding my masterclass:

This is NOT a "motivational", get rich quick, Tony Robbins type program... This is a focus on the BUSINESS of making a career out of being a magician. It will take work, daily work, many times more work than practicing a new trick... It is kinda like a "Chilton Guide" (Car repair manual) is to fixing your car... A guide will SHOW YOU how to do the work, but YOU still need to provide the hand tools, the man-hours, and elbow-grease to fix a car or build your magic career. But, the more you work on it, the easier it gets (just like fixing a car is easier for a professional mechanic than it is for a weekend tinkerer). Side note, if YOU personally get motivated by hearing other magicians tell you how THEY made it and how you can do it, I cannot be held responsible for that motivation, it is a mere side effect.

And, you are right, it would be arrogant for me to believe that I, (Scott Tokar) personally know it ALL in the magic business... Sure, I can tell you tons about tradeshow magic (and I do), but I know when to turn to the REAL experts for the many other vertical markets in the business. This is why I insisted on including focused interviews on subjects like: Magic as a General Practioner with Danny Orleans, YouTube and Leveraging you Magic with Justin Flom, Street Magic with Kosmo Kos, Gospel Magic with Greg Davidson, Working State and County Fairs with Frank Thurston, performing Sales Meetings and Speakers Bureaus with Shep Hyken, Levent on Cruise Ships, David Kaye (Silly Billy) on Kids Shows, Dana Daniels on Corporate and After Dinner Shows, Kevin James on BIG Theater Shows and Broadway, Adam Wilber on Websites and SEO, Doc Eason focusing on Bar Magic, Erick Olson talks about 4 Walling your own show, Bruce Gold - Booking with agents and Cruise ships, Garrett Thomas talks about Restaurants, Michael Carducci on CRM and automation, and David Penn on Weddings in the UK...

I have personally put my heart and soul into this Master Class, and I over delivered with SO MUCH raw footage and material that Ellusionist had to push back my release date 3 times just edit it down to only EIGHTEEN HOURS! Yes, 18 hours of solid focus on the business of magic. At times, I know the content can be dry and boring (it's business not sleights), but I tried my hardest to make it as entertaining as possible to watch… This turned out more like a college crash course in magic as an MBA than just a magic masterclass...

As a full-time tradeshow magic performer and CEO of the Corporate-Fx Tradeshow Magic Group, I don't have unlimited resources in time and energy to personally coach everyone that asks me, but I will do my best to respond to as many magicians as I can... The BEST way to reach me regarding this project, or ask me questions about the magic business is via my Instagram account and through private messaging at: https://www.instagram.com/scotttokar

Again, thanks to all my friends for all the support and encouragement in producing this class.

Scott Tokar, M.I.M.C.
Visual Communicator, Tradeshow Magician
Corporate-Fx, Inc.
Danny Kazam
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Interesting course. One thing I find most magic courses on marketing fails to address is the "how to". It's one thing to teach what needs to be done, but it's another to teach others how to do it. Scott does touch a little on the "how to", but in my opinion does not on the more important parts of marketing.

For example; We all hear how we should find our target market, but unless you go directly to an expert in marketing, (someone who has made a career in creating marketing strategies for other companies)via seminar, or books, you may not know how to go about it.

Two issues I take with the lecture part of the course. "Magicians are not our competition". This is not correct. Regardless if one wants to believe it or not, but other magicians who serve the same market as you in your local area ARE your competition. Competition isn't a bad thing. In fact, there are many positive things that come out of competition. It keeps us from becoming complacent, it motivates us to become better, helps us strive for excellence and be all that we can be. It creates friendships and relationships, and elevates the art of magic just to name a few things.

Sure, there are some who want to use unethical, and sometimes illegal means to cheat. It happens in all kinds of competition. Those people are frowned upon, and punished one way or the other when caught. Some feel so inferior that the only way they think they can compete is by belittling their competition, spreading rumors and lies. They think they have to destroy their competition at any cost.

Reality is, other local magicians who are working the same market as us are competing for local gigs. It doesn't mean we can't help each other out, or give each other support. We can even be really good friends. Our greatest competition is no doubt ourselves. We should always strive to be better than our last show.

The other issue is, trying to compete with Chuck E Cheese (which was used as an example). We are performing entertainers, we are not a catering service. The example Scott gave was illogical. 1- he suggest hiring a Princess assistant to set up the birthday show, play games with the children, and clean up after words all for the same rate she gets paid to just walking around, smile, and take pictures with children. In other words, have her work harder and do more for the same rate she gets paid for other gigs.

2- Provide pizza, snacks, games, 2 magic trick give-aways to each child (20-25) provide set-up and clean up. All this for a 2 hour birthday party to compete with Chuck E Cheese, at the cost of $500. When you break things down in price, pizza can cost about $40-60 bucks for a group of 20-25 children (2 slices each) $50 for 2 hours service of a Princess who would have to be willing to leave her other gig to work harder for the same rate, 2 tricks per child, (40-50 tricks around $1 each = $40-$50), paper plates, napkings, cups, beverages, (approx: $30), roughly totaling around $160. Subtract that from $500 = $340 in your pocket.

Ordering pizza is not a challenge to do. Any parent can simply pick up a phone and make a delivery order. Not a big selling feature, but extra work you have to do.

Here's the thing, you make that same rate by not doing all that extra stuff, by simply offering more entertainment value in your birthday packages. My top package includes all my add ons for $375 for 1 hour birthday magic show. I don't provide food, or games, or any of that stuff. I don't need to take advantage of a Princess, and believe it or not...I've been hired for a birthday party that was located at a local Chuck E Cheese.

Scott explains that balloon artists, face painters, Princesses and Super heroes are our competition. I completely disagree because I have done many, many events that not only hired me as the magician, but also hired a balloon artist, face painter, Princesses, and Super Heroes. Many events even had a bouncy tent, or several of them. Sure, there are times a parent may have to choose between a bouncy tent or a magician, which then makes them a competitor. But when has a parent ever hired 2 magicians for the same event? How many times will a parent rent a bouncy tent and a magician? I have worked several birthday parties where the parents went all out. Bouncy tent, face painter, and a magician. I've never been to an event where they hired 2 magicians. There of course is the exception of bigger events that hire several magicians for the same evening, but even then those magicians hired competed with other magicians if they are aware of it or not. Whenever someone is deciding on hire a magician for their event or party, they are choosing the one they want over the others.

There are times we are not competiting with anyone, or any other business. Client knows what they want, and already know who they want to hire. (regular clients, repeat clients) That magician only had to compete once to get that gig.

I know I'm not the best person to explain this as best as it can be, but I felt compelled to at least try.

Scott Tokar does a good job in addressing some important points about running a magic business, all the other video's and interviews are very interresting, some of them very informative as well, but over-all I found it lacking in real meat. By that, I mean the kind of stuff you can learn from taking a marketing course, or reading books by authors of well known experts in the field, who have helped teach the "how to" of each step of marketing your business.
Keep your dreams alive. Understand to achieve anything requires faith and belief in yourself, vision, hard work, determination, and dedication. Remember all things are possible for those who believe.
Mindpro
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Unfortunately, all of this sounds like a bunch of magician's thinking. I prefer to operate from an entertainment business and industry perspective.

The first thing that is a red flag for me is when a course pushes marketing before understanding business models, practices and operations. All the successful marketing in the world won't make a difference. This all seems to be based on the magicians thinking, beliefs, and perceptions and quite frankly that is not who purchasers of such services, in consumer or professional markets, operate - plain and simple.

I had others discuss this course with me and I see nothing new or inquire or really different here.

There are some things I agree with and disagree with. Other musicians are your competition as well as any other performers or entertainment offerings competing for that client's dollars. Including cake, catering, food, decorations, etc. Funds are usually on a budget and limited and it all becomes a concern to the prospect.

As I have said before I would never buy a magician's marketing course. I would make my wise investment into an entertainment business course, training or system. Do you want a piece of fish or learn to how to learn how to fish so you'll be set forever?

Also just because the creator is a great performer in no way qualifies him to offer business advice. Now I'm sure for beginners or one with little or no knowledge on this it would surely be helpful. I didn't care for the promotional copy and hype surrounding the course myself.

I have found it interesting that after 6 months so little has been touted about this course. I'm glad some found it helpful.
Mindpro
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I forgot to mention that I think the interviews can be helpful to some in the very same way as David Divinci's Magic Masters Summit. Some seem to enjoy and find value in those while others come up a bit short so it really depends on what you are seeking and your current level. I can see how some would find them helpful but again, they are just talking about their way and how they did/do things.
Stokar
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Thank you for the honest review Danny Kazam! I sure hope that the other remaining 18 hours in the course were of some value to you...

Regarding your comment, you may be right, but here are my thoughts.

If I asked most people “who is competition to the Boston Redsox” most people might say “The Yankees”. This is true, in the sport, but in the BUSINESS of baseball, the competition to the Redsox is other opportunities to spend entertainment dollars... In reality, movies, concerts, even other sports are competing for those entertainment dollars... So, in answering the competition question BOTH the Yankees and a Concert are competition to the Redsox...

If a mom and dad are going to throw a birthday party for their son or daughter, everything they might spend their birthday party budget on is a Magician’s competition. If you want to compete with these other birthday party options you must understand how much the mom and dad are willing to spend and why they might go somewhere else (besides spending it on a magician). Like bounce houses, princess, clown, games, and locations like a trampoline park or Chuck E Cheeses.

I think you may be misiing the MACRO part of my Chuck e Cheeses example while focusing on the MICRO in competing with other magicians...

For example, if you want a sweet after dinner treat, you may choose from Mrs. Fields Cookies, Baskin Robins Ice Cream, or the Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory. But once you choose from the competing deserts and select Ice Cream, you can worry about what flavor may win, Chocolate or Vanilla (if you consider the flavors competition).

I hope these examples are not too ethereal, but my point was that Chuck E Cheeses were purposely designed for kids birthday parties, and after spending two million dollars per Chuck E Cheeses franchise to host birthday parties in YOUR neighborhood, we as magicians should realise that making ONLY six figures in the same neighborhood on birthday parties is actually quite doable...

So, if you can maximize your offerings, increase your availability (by adding other employees) you can indeed make WAY more money in birthday parties. Now if you are concentrating on competing with Chuck E Cheeses, you will automatically be thinking steps ahead of the other magicians in your area, and I am willing to bet that you will no longer see them as competition.

Again, I hope my short rambling is understandable, feel free to contact me personally, I would love to help your business grow!

With respect, Scott Tokar
Oscar999
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I actually thought the Chuck E Cheese example was "mind expanding."

I enjoyed this course and felt like Scott did an excellent job of delivering solid information. For me, the Chuck E Cheese example was a way to think "differently" about the business we're really in and to appreciate the bigger opportunity. And I think it squares with some of what Mindpro has been sharing as well.

Oscar
thomasR
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I guess it depends on what type of business you are looking to be in. Do you want to be a "we do everything chuck e. cheese does" solution to birthday parties? Ok... I mean why not buy your own pizza oven while you're at it?
Mindpro
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On Jan 28, 2019, thomasR wrote:
Ok... I mean why not buy your own pizza oven while you're at it?


You may be saying that sarcastically, but I know several performers, primarily in the 2/4 walling and fundraising areas, that do carry 4-6 single pizza ovens, popcorn machines, cotton candy machines, slushy machines, hot dog wheels, etc.
cafecheckers
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On Jan 28, 2019, Stokar wrote:
I hope these examples are not too ethereal, but my point was that Chuck E Cheeses were purposely designed for kids birthday parties, and after spending two million dollars per Chuck E Cheeses franchise to host birthday parties in YOUR neighborhood, we as magicians should realise that making ONLY six figures in the same neighborhood on birthday parties is actually quite doable...

So, if you can maximize your offerings, increase your availability (by adding other employees) you can indeed make WAY more money in birthday parties. Now if you are concentrating on competing with Chuck E Cheeses, you will automatically be thinking steps ahead of the other magicians in your area, and I am willing to bet that you will no longer see them as competition.
With respect, Scott Tokar


I agree with Scott here, in that making six figures should be doable, but also think that figuring out the micro is where the real work is. Simply following what has worked for others seldom is the answer, as we have discussed many times before. For example, there are magicians who
-charge $1,000 for a Birthday Appearance,
*show up with a small bag of props and charge $375 for 45 minutes
*have a full party service offering for $500
*have BOR add-on
*use SEO to fully book
Many of these choices cannot be used in combination because it confounds the business model. Additionally, there are many other venues and markets for children entertainers that should be understood and considered. This is why it makes most sense to invest in learning the entire spectrum of possibilities as well as your individual capabilities and interests before moving too far down any path, especially when it involves adding employees, as that adds another layer of opportunity and challenges.
Dannydoyle
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There are small rural towns where you won't get more than $250 on the high end for children shows. Places like New York City you will squeak by with only a hundred grand.

The idea that one size fits all is just silly in my opinion. What works in one place is death in another. Individual markets vary tremendously in terms of absolutely everything.

None of these things guys write are necessarily wrong. Not at all and in context in the right region they are probably dead on accurate. All I'm saying is it needs to be considered.
Danny Doyle
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<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
Mindpro
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Cafécheckers and Danny's post says a lot, especially about magic marketing courses. 98% of them are nothing more than "this is what I've done, how I do it".

In reality, there is so much more to it. At the very root is understanding different business models and more than just the typical surface thinking and perceptions. Secondly is the understanding that it is not marketing that these guys need, its business skills, strategies and knowledge. I see it on a daily basis - performers put all their efforts into marketing, yet are completely unprepared on how to properly present and sell their shows and service their clients and the market. So they put their efforts into marketing, because that's what all the magic course gurus tell you to do to get more bookings, and then they are like a deer in headlights when someone does call for more information and to express interest.

The closeing/booking rate for may magicians is between 15 an 25%. This is terrible compared to 65, 70, 89 or even 85% closing/booking ratios from thos ewith the proper skills and knowledge.

I'm also constaly amazed at how little may actually know about the market they serve or specialize in.

Cafécheckers is correct, there are so many more (lucrative) markets for kids performers than most ever realize.

Also because of the general nature and approach to all of these guys is the implication or actual stating that "this information and techniques can also be used for jugglers, comedians, hypnotists, and other variety perofrmers. Rarely is that the case. If you have a course in how to be a closeup magician or a restuarant magician it is not the same if you are a hypnotist or comedian, I'm sorry. Worse yet the creators make such claims without ever personally trying or testing the information with actual comedians, DJs, jugglers, hypnotists, etc.

The firts sign of "run away as fast as you can" is when a course states that their general information is applicable across the board.

Café checkers comment "This is why it makes most sense to invest in learning the entire spectrum of possibilities as well as your individual capabilities and interests before moving too far down any path..." is the most inportant to understand of most advice offered here. Most other busiensees ential market research, industry knowledge, and a complete understanding of the busienss potential and oppotunirty BEFORE ever starting or opening a business - based on actual numbers, stats, data and reseacrch. Not for most magicians, the (the uneducated performers) decide to create and operate their busienss based on their personal beliefs and limited knowledge. This is a key for failure. This is also what separates the top 15-20% that are successfull from the remaining 80-85%.

I also agree that many performers are terrible at actually hiring (or outsourcing) others and attempting to scale. Since most are not business-inclined to begin with themselves, they are poor at hirig and traiing others employees or contracters to work with them, but that's another whole thread of its own.

Market knowledge is a major key as it dictates so much of what the foundation of your business should be based upon.

Also, if you look closely most magic marketing courses say the same things - you need a website, SEO, automation, and many other kinds of tech. These models were created for onlne marketing and infoproduct busiensses, not lactual live service-based bsuiensses.

I have a couple that I work with that made $400,000 in ten months - without a busienss card or a website, just working locally in their home area.

You won't find this in a magic marketing course.
Stokar
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Mindpro,

In this post you are square-on! Most performers ingnore the “business” aspects of magic. This is why I spent so much time in the lecture part of the course talking about business plans, expectations, and measurable results (especially at the 3 year mark).

Regarding the “this is what I’ve done and how to do it”... you can learn from those that have done it before you, but you are right that most courses cast the teacher as a know it all... This is why I spent so much time talking with so many others in the course about THEIR specialties (cruise ships, night clubs, corporate events, kid shows).

In the 18 hours, we only spent 45 minutes on web, search engines, and SEO. Frankly, if that is what interests you, you should seek a course specifically on web marketing by web marketers themselves, not their clients.

Regarding rural magicians making less than a New York magician, agreed, supply and demand. But, listen closely to my Chuck E. Cheeses example again, someone else (the person that bought the franchise) thinks there is enough birthday party money to be made in that rural community to invest nearly 2 million dollars to buy, open and run for the first year a Chuck E. Chesses. So use THEIR marketing research (by watching them, and their spending) and realize that THEY had to convince a bank (or investors) to get their loan to fill the same local birthday party market with an establishment in the same city you are selling your birthday party magic.

If you are just in love with doing magic, great I commend you... But if you are willing to work as hard at establishing your business and hire employees, and serve more than (just games for Chuck E Cheese) just a 45 minute show for a magician, you can earn way more and capture a market! Now, can we figure out how you can do more parties in the same 24 hour day, and get paid more fore each party?

I realize that my single $350 business course in magic will not in itself make you six-figures, the student has to do the work too, and part of that work is more study apart from the course, research in the vertical market, and business planning... Lke owning a 7-11, it takes more than a day’s worth of Slurpy sales to make your business a success.

By the way, I personally began my focus on tradeshow magic as my singular market in 1992 at the age of 27 (after doing kid shows from age 13-21, and then clubs and ships from 21-27 years old)... I am blessed to now own and run the most successful Tradeshow Magic Company, Corporate-Fx in the business today. I still to this day at 53 years old, study marketing and read/watch what others have to say about business in the magic community and in the greater business community. The day I stop learning is the day I should retire. I am well aware that there are smarter business people than me, my goal is to not be jealous of them, but to be motivated by them more and more each day... I hope I can do the same for others in the magic community.

A rising tide lifts all ships... My goal is to help the magic community as a whole, so that we can all benefit.

Again, thanks for the constructive criticism. I want to learn and improve from it!

Scott Tokar
cafecheckers
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Scott- I agree that knowing there is a Chuck E Cheese in town can help place some realities on the viability of owning an kids entertainment company, but not sure where the rest of what you suggest lands. People choose Chuck E Cheese because it is a no brain solution. Just covering party needs is a small part of it. How does one address the many concerns birthday party parents have that include: parking, room for guests, intrusion, house prep? Often the people hosting parties at their house with entertainment have a very different mindset regarding hosting a birthday party than those who choose Chuck E Cheese.

Adding employees is not a simple thing, when your reputation is on the lines and there is travel, uncertain hours, and high people skills required. I would think that unless you are working with family, you would need a large enough operation to account for vacation, sick leave, personal time and unforeseen circumstances (car breaks down, accident) before bringing anyone to assist at parties. It is hard enough to manage these things for oneself, while running a entertainment business.

Regarding your program, it sounds like it offers good content at a fair price and could open peoples eyes to possibilities.
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Why would one want to purchase a business in which they spend a hundred plus hours a week working in the restaurant game in order to land some 45 minute shows? It is going around the block to get next door!

If one spent the time and resources needed to do the restaurant correctly on doing the business of shows correctly I bet the ROI is much better at the very least on their time.

If I want to know what time it is all I have to do is know how to tell time and buy a watch. I do not have to learn how watches work and I certainly don't have to build one. To my way of thinking that is a bit odd.
Danny Doyle
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<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
Danny Kazam
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No offense, but no where in your lecture about the business aspect of magic did you mention how to study and research the market, nor how a magician can discover more about who their market, or markets are.

When it comes to our competition, I never stated that we only compete with other magicians. I stated that you mentioned that magicians were not our competition, and disagreed with it. Providing the same services as Chuck E Cheese does not eliminate other magicians as competition either. All it does is add more value to our service that we provide. If one is willing to decide to become a catering service while also providing entertainment, that is a person's choice. As long as they fully understand all that is involved, both from the business aspect, licensing, employee wages, taxes, etc, and the extra time and effort that goes into it.

(By the way, Chuck E Cheese thrives on much more than just hosting birthday parties. It is a family restaurant with a carnival like atmosphere. Birthday parties is just a small percentage of their over-all business.)

Danny Doyle says it really well when it comes to what works in one place, may not work well in another place. That's why it's so important to study and research your market, know how to figure out who are the people that will benefit from your service the most, know how to directly reach them, and how to get them to see the value in what you have to offer them.

Birthday parties are just one type of service I offer. Other markets I focus on is schools, libraries, festivals, and fundraisers. Each of those markets required me to study and research each one separately to better understand with whom I was dealing with, what their wants were, and how to create a show that would be of most value to them. Knowing this also helps me when putting together ads, or promoting myself to successfully target those markets directly without wasting effort or money.

I think we are quick to always think outside the box, but the box is pretty big, and plenty of idea's within the box to work with. I'm not focused on making a whole bunch of money. I gave up my painting company that was doing that for me to pursue my real passion in life, which is performing and entertainers others. It has brought me tremendous joy and fulfillment. It has been that passion that has fueled my journey of success so far, and has led me to being able to make a very good living at it.

One of the things I did like about your lecture is when you talked about working with other service providers. Personally, I think it's a great idea to contact Chuck E Cheese and work out some kind of business collaboration. Perhaps Chuck E Cheese can include the entertainers service in one of their birthday party packages? Or, cross promote with the local bouncy tent company, party supply store, etc.

I can reach out to face painters, balloon artists, super hero characters, princess', etc, and market myself to festivals and fundraisers as the person who can book all their entertainment needs. One shop provides it all.

Anyhow, for all the hours of video's in your lecture series, there is some value in it. I just personally believe it brings nothing new to the table, and fails to hit the mark on what's really important. I think you are a great speaker, and very talented.

Just want to add that I personally think Mindpro is dead on accurate in everything he has stated.
Keep your dreams alive. Understand to achieve anything requires faith and belief in yourself, vision, hard work, determination, and dedication. Remember all things are possible for those who believe.
Dannydoyle
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One danger of the partnership thing is that a company as savvy as that will soon realize that they can provide what you do for FAR less than they would pay you. I have seen it happen to balloon twisters.
Danny Doyle
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<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
Mindpro
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House Acts, exactly.

The problem with such types of interviews of other performers is it becomes a collection of everyone's individual "this is what I've done" and nothing more. Its then is up to the listener/viewer to put and piece together all of it into something possibly applicable to their business. Then they soon find that what one person was talking about in their interview is how it applied directly to them in their area and in the market they serve. More than likely it will be much different from your personal interests, markets, and performance area.

Same for summits. It can be a nice collection of interviews from a bunch of guys trying to make a living in magic, but it is just a collection of thoughts and things a sit pertains to them (usually by friends of the host which limits the knowledgebase and topics being covered).

Rarely if ever, do I see any of these guys operate from an industry position or perspective. It is always from a peer perspective. They mistakenly believe that if I have one guy that does restaurants, another that does kids parties, another that does schools, another that does festivals or fairs, and another one that does cruise ships, that they are somehow covering everything that needs to be covered. Again, they're not. They're in fact offer the majority of information that WILL NOT apply to most of the readers/viewers, so while it looks like so much info in the program, it creates less actual usable content for most. Hence the reviews they always get. Nothing about the industry or industry operations - only personal insight, thoughts, and opinions. Based only on their own experience.

Sure it can possibly be helpful to a newbie, but these guys rarely invest in this type of information and education. The worker that is stuck or has seemed to peak is who needs assistance needs help but they don't need it from others thoughts as it pertains to their own business. They want information specifically as it pertains to their business and their current situation (hence coaching and individual education) and from an industry perspective. truth be told, most are not qualified to teach this as most don't know and understand this.

Magicians must stop thinking like magicians if they ever want to cross the default threshold. Also, conventional business approaches and thinking also has great limitations. This is why I often lump all of these magic courses together. Many of them I have been asked to review and that is the problem I often have is they all come from the same place. Also just because a performer may be successful in their own business in no way makes them an authority to teach or train business. Again, at best they can only teach the limited version of what they know and have experienced, and it is almost always from the perspective of a magician.

I agree with Danny Kazam, just because something is covered in an interview or mentioned in text in no way makes it actual valid research or learnable content. So many focus on the "what" and rarely the "why" and "how".

Magician's would rather listen to online information marketers than entertainment industry professionals. They would rather base their efforts and beliefs on guru online marketers than credible entertainment industry (not magic) professionals. I would much rather sit down and listen to an entertainment company executive than an online guru.

Good thoughts.
Stokar
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On Jan 29, 2019, Cafécheckers wrote:

Adding employees is not a simple thing, when your reputation is on the lines and there is travel, uncertain hours, and high people skills required. I would think that unless you are working with family, you would need a large enough operation to account for vacation, sick leave, personal time and unforeseen circumstances (car breaks down, accident) before bringing anyone to assist at parties. It is hard enough to manage these things for oneself, while running a entertainment business.


Exactly! Thank you for helping me make my point! "It is hard enough to manage these things for oneself, while running an entertainment business", but that is what I am saying, if you want to make more money, you will be "running an entertainment business", not just doing the performing! Being in show business requires BOTH show and business. If you want to GROW in the SHOW eventually you WILL be hiring assistants, marketing people, PR people, etc. Ask David Blaine, David Copperfield, or even PIFF... Treat your magic offerings as a business, with a business plan, and have measurable goal points to see if the direction your business is going is the right direction... This is NOT a get rich quick course, if you want to make $$$ and that is all, go spend the time to become a lawyer, it will take about the same amount of time as growing the magic business, and it is a more guaranteed success than being a magician.

It was hard to write a basic enough marketing program to sell to the general magic population on Ellusionist while also trying to explain more critical business foundational truths for more experienced magicians. If you are already making $100,000+ per year maybe what I am teaching is too basic for you... Also, maybe a careful review of the fundamentals could kick someone's magic business into higher gear. Either way, That is OK, I can't be everything to everyone, even college courses have a 101, 201, etc. You can't get an MBA from an eighteen-hour course.

In "How to make six figures", I talk about many "vertical specialties" within magic. The hardest one is "general practitioner", but Danny Orleans does a great job of giving advice on that subject in the interviews. Hopefully, the course will help you focus on a specialty, and market specifically to it.

Please keep in mind, the course is only $350, if you are doing things right that should be around 1 show's income (or less). In the 4 hours of lecture alone we cover so much that is critical, I hope that you can get your money's worth out of it... The main thing is to INSPIRE you and to show you that making a solid living as a magician is doable, as much as it is fun.

The reviews thus far in magic magazines, and in THIS thread from those that have seen the course speak for themselves. But again, I can't please everybody.

Thanks again for your focused interest in the course. I appreciate and respect you.

Scott Tokar
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On Jan 29, 2019, Danny Kazam wrote:
No offense, but no where in your lecture about the business aspect of magic did you mention how to study and research the market, nor how a magician can discover more about who their market, or markets are....

Danny Doyle says it really well when it comes to what works in one place, may not work well in another place. That's why it's so important to study and research your market, know how to figure out who are the people that will benefit from your service the most, know how to directly reach them, and how to get them to see the value in what you have to offer them...

Birthday parties are just one type of service I offer. Other markets I focus on is schools, libraries, festivals, and fundraisers. Each of those markets required me to study and research each one separately to better understand with whom I was dealing with, what their wants were, and how to create a show that would be of most value to them. Knowing this also helps me when putting together ads, or promoting myself to successfully target those markets directly without wasting effort or money...



Where did we discuss researching and studying a particular market?
It starts in slide #15 "Learn all aspects of your specialty" Study your market first. We talk about why you should first work in the market to learn how to sell to it. How to become a recognized expert (outside of magic), and we go deeper in module II.

"That's why it's so important to study and research your market, know how to figure out who are the people that will benefit from your service the most, know how to directly reach them, and how to get them to see the value in what you have to offer them..." In slide #39 we talk about: "What is your potential?" and How big is your market/location/population? How are other businesses selling to the same market? Do your customers exist already or do you have to make a new market? How much did it cost to enter the same market? Estimated Start-Up Capital: $100K+ is needed when opening an indoor bounce-house business. PLUS first-year cash reserves of at least $300,000 to cover operating expenses like rent, payroll, marketing, and insurance.

And, a BIG part of what I teach is to focus and specialize in ONE aspect of magic. In slide #48 I specifically address the benefits of being a "specialist". I say something like "when you have an emergency, any doctor will do. But, when you are diagnosed with cancer, you will take the time to seek out THE specialist and pay him more. We need to do the same thing in magic. To be sought after as THE specialist in our vertical market, it will make you more marketable and profitable."

In just these three examples, I am sure you can see that I am not just teaching SEO and a "get rich quick scheme".

I attempt to teach the REAL world of making magic your business. I hope it can lift the entire industry, even if that is too lofty a goal...

With respect, and appreciation.

Scott Tokar
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