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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » ADVICE on Criss Cross Cut (5 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Ravenspur
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I'm learning a trick that Shim Lin does. The mechanics are simple, requiring a ribbon spread and a criss cross cut.

He seems to misdirect his closeup audience with patter about cutting cards and some patter about poker tells. An advice on getting the criss cross cut to work before I try it out?
Wizard of Oz
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You answered your own question Ravenspur. The Criss Cross force is a devastating tool, but it does require some time misdirection to be undetectable. Just work 20 seconds or so of additional patter after you've made the cut and you should be good to go.
Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.
MGordonB
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You just have to jump in and do it. This is one of those moves that really depends on your patter and interaction with your audience.
danaruns
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The key to the criss-cross cut is time misdirection.

You want a devastating false cut that is probably the easiest false cut there is? Try the Jay Ose (or "trinary") cut. https://youtu.be/jMnmN6YZoGE?t=100
"Dana Douglas is the greatest magician alive. Plus, I'm drunk." -- Foster Brooks
HeronsHorse
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Quote:
On Feb 21, 2019, danaruns wrote:
The key to the criss-cross cut is time misdirection.

You want a devastating false cut that is probably the easiest false cut there is? Try the Jay Ose (or "trinary") cut. https://youtu.be/jMnmN6YZoGE?t=100

Great video. But op is looking for a force, not a cut..! If he's doing the cross cut force then an alternative would be another force...
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Link774
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My favorite super-easy force is the double-turnover force. Just have them cut the deck twice, putting the cut section on top of the deck face-up, with the second cut larger than the first. It seems pretty obvious, but I haven't had an issue with folks figuring it out.
Ravenspur
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Thanks for the suggestions.
I don't think I described things well. I left out the fact that the cut is actually a force.
I suppose more than one cut could be used, depending on my presentation.

A audience member chooses the card from a shuffled deck and puts it on top of the deck and the false cut makes it look like it's buried. (I apologize for confusing Shim Lin with Vinh Giang who actually performs the trick).

If any of you experts watch the video, you can see what he does. It's mechanically simple enough for a sleightless guy like me to tackle; the genius is in the presentation, which I have more skill at.

https://www.geniionline.com/2018/01/30/v......formance
danaruns
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Quote:
On Feb 21, 2019, HeronsHorse wrote:
Quote:
On Feb 21, 2019, danaruns wrote:
The key to the criss-cross cut is time misdirection.

You want a devastating false cut that is probably the easiest false cut there is? Try the Jay Ose (or "trinary") cut. https://youtu.be/jMnmN6YZoGE?t=100

Great video. But op is looking for a force, not a cut..! If he's doing the cross cut force then an alternative would be another force...


Yeah, guess I wasn't clear. The Ose false cut is the exact same force as the criss-cross cut. It forces the top card.
"Dana Douglas is the greatest magician alive. Plus, I'm drunk." -- Foster Brooks
Link774
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Yeah, you could definitely do that with any force you're comfortable with. Good opportunity to practice the criss-cross cut though! I'd say just give it a go a few times and see how it works out. Seems like adding a bit of time after the cut, as others have mentioned, is the key. You'll also notice he doesn't say anything about selecting a card until the end, so folks don't start thinking about whether the selection is fair as the cut happens.
HeronsHorse
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Quote:
On Feb 21, 2019, danaruns wrote:
Yeah, guess I wasn't clear. The Ose false cut is the exact same force as the criss-cross cut. It forces the top card.


Got you. And I'm showing my lack of experience Smile
I should probably learn that cut myself then!
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Those who think that magic consists of doing tricks are strangers to magic. Tricks are only the crude residue from which the lifeblood of magic has been drained."
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Ravenspur
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I'm on vacation and sat down to work on a John Bannon self-worker this afternoon.

It's a good thing I was in a good mood. I kept screwing it up. No one was watching, of course. I'd do the set up have the right cards turn up in the wrong place and then do it try to fix it. But I'd space out, do an overhand shuffle and mess up the very simple set up. I finally got right what was supposed to be simple. I guess it's not enough to follow the directions (which I wrote from watching a video) you have to understand how things move and work.

Mark
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Specific advice on any trick, but especially those that are called self working:

Rehearse it. Over and over. When you read about it and think “oh, that’s so simple nobody could screw it up,” you may be tempted to go out and try it on someone right away. I am. And that’s when it goes wrong. But if you rehearse it out loud, imagining all the ways somebody could misinterpret your instructions, either deliberately or by honest mistake, then you can figure out what you can do in those situations.

This is true for all tricks, but when there is more physical dexterity and muscle training involved, it is fairly natural to do this in the course of learning the trick. Henry Hay wrote that easy tricks can be the hard ones. It is true.

Patrick
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Quote:
On Feb 23, 2019, Mr. Woolery wrote:
Specific advice on any trick, but especially those that are called self working:

Rehearse it. Over and over. When you read about it and think “oh, that’s so simple nobody could screw it up,” you may be tempted to go out and try it on someone right away. I am. And that’s when it goes wrong. But if you rehearse it out loud, imagining all the ways somebody could misinterpret your instructions, either deliberately or by honest mistake, then you can figure out what you can do in those situations.

This is true for all tricks, but when there is more physical dexterity and muscle training involved, it is fairly natural to do this in the course of learning the trick. Henry Hay wrote that easy tricks can be the hard ones. It is true.

Patrick


This is so true …
I learnt it the hard way, a long time ago.
Great advice, Patrick

Mark
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Ravenspur, are you having success, with the Cross Cut? It's very simple and the only thing to really practice, is audience management. After the cut get them to look into your eyes and say "now gaze into my eyes as I try to hypnotize you with my piercing glare." Smile and say "just kidding" and the time manipulation will have done it's job.

It's amazing to me, how these simple things still work on muggles but they do.
No matter how many times you say the wrong thing, it will NEVER be right.

If I'm not responding to you? It's because you're a TROLL!
Ravenspur
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Senor,

I will give the Cross Cut a try. I have been using Ose, however.

It's an adventure. My wife keeps volunteering me to do tricks for her piano students. The last two were in 5th grade. The problem is, they really don't understand playing cards very well. I do a self-working John Bannon trick that uses post-it's on the back of the key card jokers. When I turned the jokers over to show the post-it's, they thought it was "magic." And then I did Vinh Giang's Lie Detector, which requires a brazen peek, a false cut and a force. I did the Ose cut, and after I read one of their minds about their card choice, they thought I did a peek with the cut. If they are fooled, but think they aren't, the effect is the same. I'll give the cross cut a try this week and see what happens. I'm working on a trick Sudo Nimh sent me right now and the Turbo Stick, which I just bought.
Senor Fabuloso
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You can learn a lot from Sudo's material Smile
No matter how many times you say the wrong thing, it will NEVER be right.

If I'm not responding to you? It's because you're a TROLL!
Mr. Woolery
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For 5th graders, think visual magic. The one card trick I do for kids (works even for kindergarteners!) is card through handkerchief. The card must be signed. No signature, no trick. Then the real key element is that your handkerchief needs to be a character. It is acting as a puppet. The entertainment comes from the bit of cloth finding a card because of whatever silly explanation you come up with.

Sponge balls work very well for kids. But my best success is generally with storytelling magic.

Patrick
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