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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » Guess Who With Three Clues (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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magicfish
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This is easy? Wow
Animated Puppets
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Easy-ish... the obscurity of the references is the only veil available to prevent an obvious answer.

... though this answer is equally obscure Smile
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Animated Puppets
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Person:

1.) Octum
2.) Zooty
3.) 1/2
4.) Silent-ish
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magicfish
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Teller
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See easy-ish.

Teller voiced Octum (a mutant) in the animated movie "Gandahar" which had a wonderful riddle "In a thousand years, Gandahar was destroyed, and and all its people massacred. A thousand years ago, Gandahar will be saved, and what can't be avoided will be."

He also played Zooty on Babylon 5 along with Penn who played Rebo as a comedy team.

1/2 of Penn & Teller.

... and though silent for the most part he has been known to a few speaking parts.
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Cliffg37
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I have had three conversations with Teller in the last 30 years or so. He is very well-spoken.
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magicfish
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1. Victory
2. Nile
3. Copenhagen

...and no googling nor binging
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Dr. Livingstone ?
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S2000magician
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I find it interesting how this thread has veered away from Arthur's original premise.

In his original, the clues are straightforward, and easy to understand even if you have no idea who the person is. Everyone understands what "He was a fan of American football" means, for example.

However, later installments have morphed into cryptic clues: "Nile", "Copenhagen". Unlike "He was a fan of American football", in which the relationship between American football and the person in question is explicitly clear, we are not told what the relationship is between "Nile" and our mysterious individual. We don't know if this person likes Copenhagen, lived in Copenhagen, was born in Copenhagen, or what.

I find this particularly interesting because of my work with the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) exams. On the real exams, the questions are extremely straightforward and clear (like Arthur's clues), and extremely difficult. On many practice exams provided by third parties, however, the questions are difficult precisely because they are unclear, or convoluted, or ambiguous. In short, they're awful, both as learning tools and as tools for preparation for the actual exams, because they look nothing like the actual exam.

I propose that we try to return to Arthur's original model: give clues that are easy to understand, while still making the individual difficult to identify. It's an interesting art.
arthur stead
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I second that, S2000magician!
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Cliffg37
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I agree with S2000, especially since I seem not to have a clue about any of these. I have a straight forward one ready to go if anyone wants me to. I was waiting till I got one right, but, well that ship seems to have sailed.
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Quote:
On Sep 16, 2019, Cliffg37 wrote:
I agree with S2000, especially since I seem not to have a clue about any of these. I have a straight forward one ready to go if anyone wants me to. I was waiting till I got one right, but, well that ship seems to have sailed.


Your recognition of chess players from the 60's solved mine.
.


.
magicfish
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Ok so mine has been the easiest one so far- by far.
The answer is Horatio Nelson. Whose Flagship was the HMS Victory, who altered the course of history by smashing the French at the Battle of the Nile, and the Dutch and Danes at the Battle of Copenhagen.
Two of the most significant battles in world history.
I basically gave this one away.
magicfish
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Quote:
On Sep 16, 2019, S2000magician wrote:
I find it interesting how this thread has veered away from Arthur's original premise.

In his original, the clues are straightforward, and easy to understand even if you have no idea who the person is. Everyone understands what "He was a fan of American football" means, for example.

However, later installments have morphed into cryptic clues: "Nile", "Copenhagen". Unlike "He was a fan of American football", in which the relationship between American football and the person in question is explicitly clear, we are not told what the relationship is between "Nile" and our mysterious individual. We don't know if this person likes Copenhagen, lived in Copenhagen, was born in Copenhagen, or what.

I find this particularly interesting because of my work with the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) exams. On the real exams, the questions are extremely straightforward and clear (like Arthur's clues), and extremely difficult. On many practice exams provided by third parties, however, the questions are difficult precisely because they are unclear, or convoluted, or ambiguous. In short, they're awful, both as learning tools and as tools for preparation for the actual exams, because they look nothing like the actual exam.

I propose that we try to return to Arthur's original model: give clues that are easy to understand, while still making the individual difficult to identify. It's an interesting art.

Cryptic?
Oh dear. How very disappointing, Bill.
Victory at the Nile and at Copenhagen while sailing the VICTORY??? LOL my goodness nothing could be more straight forward nor less cryptic.
But then, I suppose just because you know grammar doesn't mean you know history. I'll leave this thread now before I say something I'll regret.

Have fun.
S2000magician
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Quote:
On Sep 16, 2019, magicfish wrote:
Quote:
On Sep 16, 2019, S2000magician wrote:
I find it interesting how this thread has veered away from Arthur's original premise.

In his original, the clues are straightforward, and easy to understand even if you have no idea who the person is. Everyone understands what "He was a fan of American football" means, for example.

However, later installments have morphed into cryptic clues: "Nile", "Copenhagen". Unlike "He was a fan of American football", in which the relationship between American football and the person in question is explicitly clear, we are not told what the relationship is between "Nile" and our mysterious individual. We don't know if this person likes Copenhagen, lived in Copenhagen, was born in Copenhagen, or what.

I find this particularly interesting because of my work with the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) exams. On the real exams, the questions are extremely straightforward and clear (like Arthur's clues), and extremely difficult. On many practice exams provided by third parties, however, the questions are difficult precisely because they are unclear, or convoluted, or ambiguous. In short, they're awful, both as learning tools and as tools for preparation for the actual exams, because they look nothing like the actual exam.

I propose that we try to return to Arthur's original model: give clues that are easy to understand, while still making the individual difficult to identify. It's an interesting art.

Cryptic?

Yes: cryptic.

Is Victory to be taken literally, or is it a name?

Is Copenhagen a city, or a chewing tobacco?

Quote:
On Sep 16, 2019, magicfish wrote:
Oh dear. How very disappointing, Bill.

Sorry about that. I certainly didn't intend to disappoint you.

Quote:
On Sep 16, 2019, magicfish wrote:
Victory at the Nile and at Copenhagen while sailing the VICTORY??? LOL my goodness nothing could be more straight forward nor less cryptic.

Nothing?

How about saying that he had a victory at the Nile, and a victory at Copenhagen, and that he sailed a ship named Victory? That's clearly straightforwarder and less cryptic.

You know: in the same manner that Arthur told us what all of the words mean.

There's nothing intrinsically wrong with they game you're playing. It's simply a completely different game than the one that Arthur proposed.

Quote:
On Sep 16, 2019, magicfish wrote:
But then, I suppose just because you know grammar doesn't mean you know history.

Well, duh!

I know some history, but certainly not all history.

Quote:
On Sep 16, 2019, magicfish wrote:
I'll leave this thread now . . .

That's too bad, and it was not my intention to make you uncomfortable here.

Quote:
On Sep 16, 2019, magicfish wrote:
. . . before I say something I'll regret.

If your concern about regret is that you might say something that would offend me, let me allay that concern: you won't.

It is, after all, just a game.

Quote:
On Sep 16, 2019, magicfish wrote:
Have fun.

I intend to.

I hope that you can, as well.

And I trust that you know that I mean that sincerely.
arthur stead
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S2000, since Magicfish has chosen to leave, why don’t you jump in and submit 3 clues to resume the game?
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Cliffg37
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I'm on it. I've been waiting for it anyway. See if these clues are more appropriate...

1) I am not a "Dame" but the Queen did bestow me the title CBE (Commander of the British Empire) 1 step below knighthood.
2) I invented the head worn microphone that allows music performers to dance while they sing.
3) I have had several huge hits in England, but in the U.S. I am sadly a one hit wonder.
Magic is like Science,
Both are fun if you do it right!
Cliffg37
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4) an unofficial album of my "B" sides and rarities has been called, "Shrubberies."
Magic is like Science,
Both are fun if you do it right!
S2000magician
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John Cleese?
Cliffg37
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Nice one, but no.

5) I am not related, but I share my last name with two United States Presidents.
Magic is like Science,
Both are fun if you do it right!
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