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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Rings, strings & things » » Favorite color-changing knife routine? (21 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Leo H
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It was Michael Skinner's routine, the first half, then I use Johnny Thompson's ending. Skinner's ending is unsatisfying. Afterwards the spectator looked at me deadpan and said something like funny how the blade jumped to the other side. The blades on Mogar knives really stand out. You can hardly see them on Merrill knives.

Some people are really observant of small details. They can surprise us. I performed the routine really close with the individual standing about a foot away. At a bar or restaurant table the distances are greater so the blade discrepancy shouldn't be noticed. A strolling magician might want to stand back just a little and do the paddle move with a bit more hug around the knife.
Pop Haydn
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I wonder if there is something about the way the move is done that lets them notice the turnover. I have never had that problem, and I have done this routine for many years. I suspect it may have to do with the way the moves are done, for example, the knife is "shown" on both sides to the spectator. That should not happen. The move should be done for yourself, as if you are checking to see the back of the knife. If it looks like a move, or you are "proving" with the move, the audience will be on alert. If the knives are handled casually, and the performer uses the Friedman Flip and other convincers, the audience should not be so focused. It is important to have a routine that controls the audience's thinking, and answers their objections before they are voiced. Most color-changing routines have too much proving, and not enough leading. You want to use both hands working separately with two knives as much as possible, to split focus.
thegreatscungilli
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Pop, your comments and advice on this topic have been great and very helpful to me in improving this routine..
Pop Haydn
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BTW, I have used the Mogar Knives for many years and never, ever had the problem of people noticing the knife blade move. The new Boker knives from Rodger Lovins have much less noticeable blades, but it really shouldn't be important. If you ask for agreement in any way, by turning the knife over to show the back of the knife to the spectator, he will want to take the knife and look at it. This is what provokes that response. When you "show" both sides to the audience, it is asking for agreement--"See it is white on both sides." You do that, and the audience is provoked into "checking" and their gaze will sharpen. If you casually check for yourself, and not show towards the audience, they can see "over your shoulder" and check for themselves. Since you are not seeking "agreement" they will not feel they are being tricked.
sethb
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I think it's also important to note that almost any magic trick or sleight has a weak spot -- bad angles, illogical moves, phony or suspicious-looking props, and so forth.

It's our job to either strengthen or cover up that weak spot, through routining, misdirection or technical work, so that's it's less noticeable or almost invisible. And having good control over the audience helps, too. There is also a fine line between convincing the specs that something is "normal" by your handling or your words, and either handing everything out for examination (never a good idea) or being challenged to do so. SETH
"Watch the Professor!!" -- Al Flosso (1895-1976)
"The better you are, the closer they watch" -- Darwin Ortiz, STRONG MAGIC
Comedy Writer
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The reason I ask is Professional; I'm now making CC knife sets and want a good beginner and advanced routine to include. (With permission, of course!)
FrankFindley
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Quote:
On Mar 31, 2020, Comedy Writer wrote:
The reason I ask is Professional; I'm now making CC knife sets and want a good beginner and advanced routine to include. (With permission, of course!)


Aldo Colombini's routine is one of the best beginner ones because it simplifies bringing knives in and out of play. https://www.lybrary.com/color-changing-k......235.html

The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Rings, strings & things » » Favorite color-changing knife routine? (21 Likes)
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