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Harry Lorayne
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I posted this elsewhere and was just asked to also post it here - because some here may be interested in the good stuff! So - here's that post:

So; just received one call (ONE) from a guy asking where he can acquire my books (mentioned above by Chi Han, who obviously knows about the good stuff) - REPUTATION-MAKERS and RIM SHOTS. So; for others who may be interested in the good stuff --- both those books, PLUS my book, AFTERTHOUGHTS, plus new ideas/concepts, are re-written, updated, etc, all in LORAYNE: THE CLASSIC COLLECTION, Volume 2. (My favorite of my five CLASSIC COLLECTION volumes - Volume 1 sold out long time ago - and Volume 2 heading in that direction.)

I can't imagine a better bargain. C'mon...over 120 effects/routines, etc., plus many "handlings" like my HaLo Cut, Ultra Move, Status Quo Shuffle and many, many more. (Over the years, many have told me that just the very first item in that volume - CARD SHARP & THE FOUR GAMBLERS - is worth many times the cost of the book. Many have said the same about my Memory Magic Square and Instant Magic Square, all in that one volume.)

You can find out more about the book - even order! - at harryloraynemagic.com . Or, email me at harrylorayne@earthlink.net with any questions.
[email]harrylorayne@earthlink.net[/email]

http://www.harrylorayne.com
http://www.harryloraynemagic.com
Slack23
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Hi Mike,

That’s exactly the same for me, my partner does point out where I’ve gone wrong and when I retreat back to the office, tail between legs, I practice some more and reflect on what she has said – slowly learning to accept that she is actually a very good source of feedback due to her non-inhibited straightforwardness, “it’s in your hand, you’ve been doing it all week!” haha.

I will definitely send you a PM, thank you for that. And sincere apologies from the massive delay in replying to you – I set aside time for magic and during this past week managed to join myself a magic club which I’m so chuffed with and not at all what I expected! Also, been catching up on some sleights I should know by now!

Thanks again Mike,
Slack23
Slack23
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Thanks sirbrad – sincere apologies for the late reply, please don’t think I don’t appreciate your message!

I’m glad you mentioned The Amateur Magician’s Handbook and Mark Wilson, they are the ones that I have started out with. I have ordered Harry Lorayne’s Magic Book due to many recommendations from a few of the posts on the café. I will definitely look into Scarne and Stein and Day Handbook – after researching these I feel these would be right up my street.

Believe me sirbrad, long essays, theory and psychology are exactly what I enjoy, but after a few tips and bits of advice from others, the presentation has started to click and I am seeking out more information on presentation – I believe this is what I really need to put the work into, the sleights and the tricks are the dessert for me, I need to put the work in for the Showmanship aspect. What an excellent journey to begin. Even though I have already began, still very excited to continue, I suppose that’s how I know that this is definitely for me.

Thank you for all the tips on favourite books – I will check them out, as much as I try not to, I am always on the look-out for as much information as I can to help me in my studies.

I know that I have mentioned this a lot, but I really do appreciate that – you mention that you like to have as much knowledge as possible – really great that, I do have many books on the shelf and as a beginner I felt like I shouldn’t have these and just start with a few. However, the fact you have said they are there for reference to have right when you need them has put me right at ease. I have finally begun to understand the process and really am enjoying it. Although my Charlier Cut would beg to differ!

Please know that I have saved your post as a reference for myself, I can’t articulate how much that has helped me and I can really see how much that will be of use to me in the future. The books, videos and other publications you have listed are such a great help – thank you again.

What an amazing community of people to come together and help – magic truly is magical.

Thank you so much,
Slack23
sirbrad
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No problem, and actually it has been a long time since I posted one of those posts but I used to post those types of posts every day back in the day on the Penguin Magic forums and on here, constantly giving advice to newcomers every day who were flooding in after seeing "Street Magic" wanting to be like David Blaine. But it felt good to write one of my long posts again. I was not labeled "most prolific poster" for nothing lol. But brings back a lot of memories and old habits die hard lol.

But yeah it is best to collect as many books as you can as you never know when they will go out of print, then prices will skyrocket on some and you end up paying a fortune to get for them. So at least they are on your shelf then when you are ready for them.

But even I did not have a lot of books first starting out as they were not as widely available back then or as easy to get like now. So I worked with the several I had for years, and I wish I had all the books that I do now back then. But I would have still studied the same way regardless even if I had 10,000 books.

Most of the time I prefer to stick with one book at first, and become proficient at all of the material that I like in the book. But having limited access at first really made me become proficient at it since there was not much out there or hard to find back then, and you had to take what was at the library until the internet arrived thankfully.

There were no magic shops close to me either, then later on when I was in my teens I found one about 60 miles away so then I was able to go there once in awhile and stock up. Shortly after that the internet came along and I had the world at my fingertips to order as many books, VHS's DVDs, and tricks as I wanted. Today's generation will never know what it was like not to have all that, nor will they ever have the same appreciation for it as we do.

But yeah there is really no right way to do it, only the way that works best for you. You can start out with one book or 100 books, but you can only read one at a time. But it is always motivating and exciting to know that many more are waiting for you, and that an infinite amount of knowledge is there ready to be "gem-mined" in the treasure chest.

Some practice every effect in the book as they go, others read the whole book first then go back to their favorites. So there are many ways to do it and the only right way is the way that you enjoy, and the way that works best for you. But it sounds like you already have enough now to get started, and keep you busy for a long time. That is why I loved it when I become a pro as I could read and study a lot more and practice all day and sometimes all night in between gigs.

The only downside is burnout, so having a lot of new stuff to work on helps with that also, or just take a break from it all for awhile.
The great trouble with magicians is the fact that they believe when they have bought a certain trick or piece of apparatus, and know the method or procedure, that they are full-fledged mystifiers. -- Harry Houdini
Bob G
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Hi Stack23,


I'll pass on to you a piece of advice that Al Schneider gave me recently - it struck me as excellent for those of us who get so excited that we want to learn everything all at once. He said (I'm paraphrasing) pick just one easy trick, learn it well, and then perform it for as many people as you can. When you feel you've learned as much as you can from performing that trick, move on to another, and so on. At least at the beginning. One advantage of this method is that it gets you performing right away; another is that, if you suffer from stagefright, as I do, it takes a lot of pressure off of you. Performing doesn't have to mean a formal performance; your audience can be a spouse, son or daughter, or dog. Smile



I've been studying magic for about 3.5 years and, while I've learned a lot, I haven't progressed as far as I'd like, probably because of what Pop said about studying vs. doing. I think Schneider's idea is going to help a lot.


Maybe that will help you; if it isn't relevant to you, at least I got some typing practice!


Best of luck,


Bob
weirdwizardx
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Mostly has been covered but I will add my thoughts,

Read a book

Focus on the effects you like

Practice it and perform it a lot (WITHOUT BOTHERING YOUR AUDIENCE) as Darwin Ortiz says the effect you are doing now is publicity for the next (not sure if I quote him correctly, but I think you get the point)

GO free style, I mean read everything you want, see videos, lectures, there is no default route just go and explore what you think you will like

Cristóbal
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