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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workers » » Non-Flashy False Cut (3 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Bob G
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Thanks for asking this question, Magicwilia. Like you I've been looking for false cuts that aren't flashy, that look like real cuts.
magicwiia
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I watched Liam Montier's False Shuffles and False Cuts Project DVD which demonstrates 14 false cuts. I watched Jay Ose three-packet cut and it did not fool my eyes. The Tarbell 3-packet cut, which is similar, mixes the packets up so it seems to me to have a better chance of fooling the audience.

Oddly enough the Bobbie Bernard two-packet false cut did fool me. It is demonstrated at 3:12 of this video especially with the double tap:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UV9_qgA4YGQ

I really like the Lewis Jones false cut which involves one swivel cut in addition to one swing cut. I didn't think it looked flourishy and makes it very difficult for someone to follow the three packets.

Has anyone ever gotten "busted" using the Bobbie Bernard false cut?
Tortuga
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Attitude is the critical component IMHO. I've seen good false cuts butchered because the person executing the cut made it look like a "move". All of the cuts shown in the Pandrea video above are excellent, but what "sells" them all is a casual, matter-of-fact approach. Especially with regard to the last one. If you tense up before exchanging the halves, then it will instantly telegraph to the spectator that "something" happened. They don't have to know what, but when they know you did something irregular the mystery begins to fade away.

Erdnase, in his section on shifts remarked that in his opinion "The shift has yet to be invented that can be executed by a
movement appearing as coincident card-table routine; or that can be executed with the hands held
stationary and not show that some manoeuvre has taken place, however cleverly it may be performed."

Funny how somehow Erdnase makes exceptions for magicians as while he says gamblers seldom perform a shift or need to, magicians use the shift in nine-tenths of their tricks. Of course nowadays that isn't accurate as many magicians cannot perform a pass at all, but the takeaway for me is that magicians can either "get away" with shifts more easily or perhaps their audiences aren't as studious. Certainly getting caught cheating at the card table can have serious consequences while getting caught out in a trick simply leads to embarrassment.

While Erdnase was writing about shifts, I think we should use the same logic when evaluating false cuts and really any sleight. To be fair, Erdnase did describe two "showy" false cuts, but he did caution the reader about their use. He indicated that two of the cuts he described, simple cuts, were superior.

So, to me, it seems reasonable that any false cut you use should conform to normal behavior. A simple cut, performed casually, drawing no undue attention to itself is certainly best.
magicwiia
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Tortuga, you are correct about the third one he does which involves doing a P***. I've never worked on it but know it is one I need learn. I'll have to use the Bobbie Bernard two-packet cut or Lewis Jones false cut (or some other suggestion) in the meantime.

I agree that the ease and fluidity of the move, where no antenna is raised, is the most important aspect of a successful false cut.
Jonathan Townsend
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Harry mentioned the cut in Apocalypse Vol 9 issue 2 in context of a cardcase transposition.

Tapping the packets... interesting. Bobby Bernard was a bright guy. I had seen people doing the false cut from an end pull, as in Hindoo shuffle, and with a full swivel action which spins the packet a half turn before the tabling action.
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Bob G
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1. Hi Jon, What conclusion do you draw from the various statements you made in the preceding post?


2. I agree with Tortuga -- keep it simple. My problem with triple cuts is that I just get confused. I see packets moving around and have no idea whether the cut was real or false. My ideal, I guess, is a simple false cut in which two packets seem to change places. One that looks promising -- can't remember where I saw it, but I think it was in a book by Racherbaumer -- is the Marnase cut (Marlo + Erdnase). Another is the optical false cut in Card College.



Now I'm going to watch the Bernard cut and see what I think. Smile


Okay, I watched the Pandrea video (not sure which, if any, of the cuts there are Bernard's). The cut that I liked by far the best was the third one, based on the pass -- when the pack was tabled. I found that very natural and deceptive. I hadn't planned to learn the pass, but it might be worth working on it enough to do this cut. (Would it be a classic pass? And am I realistic in thinking that I wouldn't need to do anything like a perfect pass to make the cut deceptive?)


The "tapping" business in the other methods bothered me -- yes, it fooled my eye, but I can imagine spectators wondering why I'm doing it and thus being suspicious.


Bob
Tortuga
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Bob, the mechanics of the third false cut from the video do resemble the classic pass. Watch the motion closely. Try to avoid excessive hand motion. The right hand arches over the deck and grasps the lower half only. This frees up the LH fingers to pull the top half over, down and under. In a regular classic pass you re-assemble the pack. in this case, you separate the hands and return the RH portion of the deck to the bottom or onto the table.

I think it is slightly easier than a classic pass in that you have the motion of the hand separation to give a bit of cover. In the regular classic pass, the hands remain basically motionless, unless you are using "the dip" for cover, etc.

Good luck with it.
Bob G
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Thanks for this helpful, detailed reply, Tortuga. "Slightly" easier makes me a bit nervous -- but I always have the other two cuts to work on if this one doesn't work out for me.


See you,


Bob
Jonathan Townsend
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Quote:
On Nov 13, 2019, Bob G wrote:
1. Hi Jon, What conclusion do you draw from the various statements you made in the preceding post?
Hopefully that I appreciate the Bobby Bernard false cut.
Going back to when Harry Lorayne's magazine was happening - history - I discovered the false cut while working on a routine. So, it was time for a false cut. I did not want to regrip the pack or do the pull action I'd seen in print and that others did. The Kick cut just seemed the right way to start. While overcoming the magician's guilt of such a direct move, and practicing this discrepant cut, I brought my right hand over to my left again, and divided the packet remaining to make a three way cut. Next try, kicked over more than half the pack and - well that was that. It seemed to move correctly for a cutting action. It sounded correct. And as long as I didn't look at my hands while separating the packets it seemed work in routine.

Kicking over more than half the pack allowed for a second false cut after the first packet gets thumped to the table. That's how I got a one, two, three rhythm for the cut. The snap wrist turn action in the left hand as the packets separate was pretty much in the air at that time so it was not a conscious action either. That takes the false cut item back to the early 1980s. Harry mentioned it might have history before then. At the time Harry also demonstrated the false cut he'd been using for a long time which uses a different action to separate the packets.

Bobby Bernard's approach to use a distinct timing beat - breaking up the action into separate, square, then table - was his own. And he'd been doing magic with cards for a long time before his false cut was published. He got the one, two, three rhythm from a single cut. Kudos to him.
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Bob G
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Thanks for all these details, Jon. The cut sound quite good, and I have a lot of admiration for people who discover (or rediscover) magical maneuvers.


Does anyone have a reference for Bernard's cut? Jon's description is really good, but I'd need pictures to fully understand the move. This may have been addressed already on this thread, but I'm finding the thread confusing.


Bob
magicwiia
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Bob....I think the Bobby Bernard false cut is referenced in Roberto Giobbi's Card College, Volume 1, 1995

https://www.conjuringarchive.com/list/bo......ght=7956

The move can be see in the video I referenced above and also at 2:30 of this video where it also identifies it as being from Giobbi's Card College. This video shows 9 other false cuts and references each one of them:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMnmN6YZoGE
Jonathan Townsend
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Look in Card College volume 1 page 55 - key position. Item is on page 58. Smile
...to all the coins I've dropped here
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